Einstein on The Street: Philip Glass and ‘Sesame Street’ introduce kids to geometry and Minimalism!
07.17.2013
09:30 am

Topics:
Music
Television

Tags:
Sesame Street
Philip Glass
Minimalism


 
“Geometry of Circles” is a series of animated shorts created for Sesame Street in 1979 with music by Philip Glass.

From the Muppet Wiki:

The shorts consist of the movement of six circles (each with a different color of the rainbow) that are formed by and split up into various geometric patterns. Glass’s music underscores the animation in a style that closely resembles the “Dance” numbers and the North Star vignettes written during the same time period as his Einstein on the Beach opera.

Below, all four of the “Geometry of Circles” animations produced by Glass and The Children’s Television Workshop:
 

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Right-winger accuses ‘Sesame Street’ of corrupting America’s youth with self-esteem
06.17.2013
10:05 am

Topics:
Class War

Tags:
Sesame Street

Sesame Street
 
Sesame Street has always dealt with social realities with a frank and sympathetic voice, from folksinger Buffy Sainte-Marie explaining breastfeeding to Big Bird, to Jesse Jackson’s impassioned “I am Somebody” speech (seriously, that one’s a kick right in the old working-class ovaries). A few days ago the beloved children’s institution released an online toolkit for educators and families to help children deal with having a parent who is incarcerated.

The American Prison Industrial Complex (which is becoming quite a cash cow for a select few 1%ers) holds 25% of the world’s prisoners, though we only make up 5% of the world’s population. We jail more people than any other country in the world. One out of 28 children in America have a parent in prison, and it goes without saying that it’s both traumatic and difficult for a child to understand.

It would seem that helping a child deal with that sort of trauma would be a completely unobjectionable project, but Meredith Jessup at Glenn Beck’s website, The Blaze, seems to think Sesame Street failed by not explicitly portraying law-breakers as wrong-doers.

As Liz reported yesterday, PBS’ “Sesame Street” is moving on from ABCs and 123s to offer its young audience bigger life lessons, including coping strategies for when mom and/or dad winds up in the slammer.

At the show’s site, “tool kits” offer tips for caregivers, including explaining the concept of incarceration in a kid-friendly way.  I was particularly struck by this one:

    “When explaining where an incarcerated parent is, you can say, “Daddy is in a place called prison (or jail) for a while. Grownups sometimes go to prison when they break a rule called a law.”

Is it me or does this make it seem like jail time is par for the course?

It’s nice that Sesame Street has stepped forward to try and help kids left behind by parents serving time. Being removed from a parent can be seriously traumatic for kids and lend itself to developmental problems of their own.  These are kids who need support.

That said, however, I’ve watched each of the videos produced by Sesame Workshop for the campaign.  It strikes me that there’s no real advice offered for teaching kids lessons in right vs. wrong; there’s no guide for driving conversations about what crime has been committed and/or how mommy or daddy could have acted differently.  Instead, the focus seems to be on alleviating the stigma attached to having a parent in prison.

Which would be absolutely terrible, wouldn’t it?

It’s essential to be supportive of innocent kids caught in these terrible situations, but I think it’s just as important to make sure they have the tools needed to avoid the same fate as their parents — a moral education and established expectations of responsibility. Otherwise, it doesn’t seem like we’re doing this kids any great service.

Oh, for sure. Discussing a complex and incredibly unjust legal system that disproportionately jails black, Latino, and/or poor men is totally appropriate for an eight-year-old. Destigmatizing incarceration would simply make the child feel better about themselves and their family, and we can’t possibly have that, now can we? We should really be pulling children aside and calmly explain to them that their Daddy is a terrible person because he got caught with a baggie of weed.

Congratulations, Meredith Jessup, you are officially the worst person in the world (at least for this morning).
 

Written by Amber Frost | Discussion
Waiting for Elmo: ‘Sesame Street’ meets Samuel Beckett
11.14.2012
03:14 pm

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
Samuel Beckett
Sesame Street


 
Sesame Street’s fantastic Samuel Beckett parody, “Waiting for Elmo”:

“A modern masterpiece, a play so modern and so brilliant that it makes absolutely no sense to anybody.”

—Alastair Cookie

 

 
Via Open Culture

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Herbie Hancock demonstrates a Fairlight CMI synth on Sesame Street in the early 1980s


 
Herbie Hancock demonstrates his Fairlight CMI on Sesame Street circa 1983.

The Fairlight Computer Music Instrument (CMI) was a state-of-the-art Synthesizer/Sampler workstation when it hit the market in 1979 and its rep has endured. Finding one today for sale is nearly impossible. They’re highly collectible among people who collect such things.

The little girl whose voice is being sampled, Tatyana Ali, went on to star on The Fresh Prince Of Bel Air.
 

Written by Marc Campbell | Discussion
Three Primary Colors: New OK Go music video (and game) from ‘Sesame Street’
02.02.2012
03:23 pm

Topics:
Art
Music
Pop Culture

Tags:
Sesame Street
Al Jarnow
OK Go


 
Usually their videos have millions of views on day one, but this one seems to have slipped out unnoticed, relatively speaking. There is also an OK Go color game at Sesame Street.com.

Directed by Al Jarnow, the animator responsible for the iconic “Cosmic Clock” short. This is his first new work for Sesame Street in over 25 years.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Cosmic Clock: The Passing of Time Visualized

Thank you Jesse Jarnow!

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
James Earl Jones recites the Alphabet on Sesame Street
12.05.2011
10:36 am

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
Sesame Street
Darth Vader
James Earl Jones


 
In other words, “Darth Vader recites the alphabet on Sesame Street.” Who knew the alphabet could be so intense?

And if that wasn’t enough for you, here’s James Earl Jones counting to 10.
 

 
(via IHC)

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Stop-motion of Sesame Street’s ‘Pinball Number Count’


 

 

 
Nice stop-motion recreation of classic Sesame Street segment, the “Pinball Number Count.” I really wished they had retained the original, ultra funky theme song sung by The Pointer Sisters, though.
 

 
(via BuzzFeed)

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Sesame Street crew covers The Beastie Boys


 
The Sesame Street crew get crazy with the Beastie Boys’ “Sure Shot.”

This was put together by British branding and graphics company Wonderful Creations.

Grover is groovin’.
 

Written by Marc Campbell | Discussion
The Yip Yips discover Dubstep
05.11.2011
10:45 am

Topics:
Amusing
Music

Tags:
Sesame Street
Yip Yips
Dubstep
Drumstep


 
According to the YouTube comments this genre of music is called Drumstep, not Dubstep. It’s hard to keep track these days.

 
(via Nerdcore)

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Your morning knockout: Down for The Count
07.20.2010
08:52 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art

Tags:
Sesame Street
Twilight
The Count

image
 
I’m assuming this is an Anti-Twilight inspired piece by poopbear. BTW, Count von Count totally rules in my book! 
 
Down for the Count

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Spoiler alert! John Locke is not The Smoke Monster
04.22.2010
10:50 pm

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
Sesame Street
Lost
John Locke
The Cookie Monster

image
 
I fucking knew it! 
 
(via An Internet Website and The Daily What)

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Gangsta Yip Yips do “Ante Up”
10.31.2009
09:54 am

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
Sesame Street
Yip Yips

 
Superb!

Bonus clip: The Yip Yip Family

Via our pals at the mighty Nerdcore

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Sesame Street’s Pitch for Television (1969)
10.09.2009
05:47 pm

Topics:
Amusing
History

Tags:
Sesame Street

 
From Time:“The biggest juggernaut in children’s-television history sprang forth from mundane origins. At a Manhattan dinner party in 1966, a Carnegie Foundation executive named Lloyd Morrissett mentioned that his young daughter was so enthralled by television that she would park herself in front of the family’s set to gaze at early-morning test patterns. That story prompted a public-television producer named Joan Cooney to investigate how television could be used to package education as entertainment: “What if it went down more like ice cream than spinach?” The ensuing creation ?

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion