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‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show’ trading cards

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A childhood passion for horror movies and Frankenstein and all things strange brought me to The Rocky Horror Show.

It all started in junior school during a family holiday to London in 1974. The usual tourist sights were fine, but I’d seen most of them before on a trip with my grandparents when I was seven. Now I was more thrilled by the buzz and noise and giant hoardings for theatrical productions and movies like Chinatown with its serpentine coils of smoke. It was such glorious advertising that first alerted me to The Rocky Horror Show.

On the side of one of those big red Routemaster buses going to Peckham or Camden or wherever, I first saw the ad for The Rocky Horror Show, featuring an androgynous woman (or was it a man?) with short hair and big hooped earrings, looked slightly askance at something just out of vision. Returning home to Scotland, I studied the weekend reviews for any more information. I soon learned this show was an award-winning musical by Richard O’Brien. It told the story of a transvestite Dr. Frank N. Furter played by Tim Curry and his plans to make a man. There was also some plot line about aliens from the transsexual planet Transylvania. It certainly sounded my kinda thing. I clipped and kept any article I chanced upon relating to Mr. Curry, or Mr. O’Brien, or The Rocky Horror Show.

One Sunday in 1975, the Observer Magazine featured a four-page color spread on the forthcoming movie version The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Under the headline “Something to Offend Everyone,” I read about Tim Curry’s upbringing as the son of a naval chaplain, his time as an actor at the Citizen’s theater in Glasgow, performing in drag for Lindsay Kemp‘s production of Jean Genet’s The Maids. Of Richard O’Brien’s time as a stuntman on Carry on Cowboy, and how he had written the musical one cold winter in an attic between acting jobs. The production started out Upstairs at the Royal Court Theater—famed for John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger and kitchen sink drama—before moving to the King’s Road, where it remained until 1979. The article described the film as making comic reference to Frankenstein, Bride of Frankenstein, 1950s American sci-fi movies, even Esther Williams’ movies, and that it was bound to upset quite a lot of people.

When The Rocky Horror Picture Show was released, the critics hated it. The public hated it, too. My high school buddies didn’t even know that it existed. Men in drag was not really the kinda thing to interest most boys my age who were mainly into soccer, Slade, and Monty Python. Anyway, we were still all too young to gain admittance to see the film as it had been given an “AA” certificate—which meant it was for those lucky kids over fourteen.

I eventually saw the film a few years later and was not disappointed. By then, I’d bought the album and worn out its cherished grooves. Still, no one I knew was even the slightest bit interested in this quirky, strange movie. Punk had arrived and Star Wars was out, and that was all that mattered.

But good art will always win out—eventually. And so it was with The Rocky Horror Picture Show when the devotion of a small group of New Yorkers made it the biggest cult musical of all time.

Over the years, I’ve picked up the occasional Rocky merchandise. Richard O’Brien’s Rocky Horror Show Scrapbook, the original cast album, the original movie poster, et cetera, et cetera, and of lastly but not necessarily least, an infuriatingly incomplete set of trading cards which you can drool over below.
 
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#1. Tim Curry as Frank N. Furter.
 
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#2. Richard O’Brien as Riff Raff.
 
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#3. Susan Sarandon as Janet Weiss.
 
More ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show’ trading cards after the jump….

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Posted by Paul Gallagher
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05.17.2017
10:49 am
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Rocky Horror Denture Show: Artist recreates Dr. Frank-N-Furter/Tim Curry’s teeth
10.17.2016
08:38 am
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I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again, “Well someone had to do it, right?”

And this someone is painter and sculptor Jessine Hein. We’ve blogged about Hein’s work here before when she created dentures of David Bowie’s old teeth before he had them “fixed” with porcelain veneers.

This time around it’s The Rocky Horror Picture Show‘s own Dr. Frank-N-Furter’s pearly whites. They’re made of denture acrylics, plaster and acrylic paint.

When I think of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, I think of Tim Curry’s big crooked smile. Dr. Frank-N-Furter was a character on the forefront of expressing oneself honestly and unapologetically. And his wonky teeth were not standing in the way of his outrageous glamor. Instead they were highlighting his shimmering personality and were part of his charm. It’s a beautiful example of a complimentary imperfection.

Some time ago Curry got his teeth “fixed.” That inspired me to revive the original oral pearls of the one and only “sweet transvestite” in celebration of things that don’t need a remake.

Not only is Jessine Hein skilled at making exact replicas of pop icons’ teeth, she’s one hell of an oil painter, too. Do yourself a favor and check out her work here.


 

 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Tara McGinley
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10.17.2016
08:38 am
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Found: Lost behind-the-scenes Polaroids from ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show’

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Imagine traveling home one night and finding a set of behind-the-scenes photos from one of your favorite shows. Well, something like that did happen to Brady Marter, who later uploaded his prized find onto the Collector’s Weekly site:

Founds these on the platform of the C train in TriBeCa in 2011. They are photos of Tim Curry and the cast of Rocky Horror during the making of the film. Some have writing on the back and Frankenfurter kissed the back of one.

Obviously, these beauties from The Rocky Horror Show weren’t just deliberately discarded or tossed out with the garbage, but were accidentally dropped by collector Larry Viezel who posted on the site:

These were part of a collection I bought from someone in New Mexico. These were used in making The Rocky Horror Scrapbook. I had it shipped to my office (I worked on the corner of Hudson and Canal) and was taking them home. A bunch fell out of my bag and I picked them up. When I got home I realized I missed one. Looks like I missed more than one! If it’s any proof, I’d be happy to show you the rest of the collection.

Thankfully, the story does have a happy ending. Larry had his lost photos returned shortly after they appeared on Collector’s Weekly, as he exclusively tells Dangerous Minds:

The guy that found them was working just a few blocks away from where I was working in Manhattan at the time on Hudson Street when I lost them. But he had since moved to the south. He was very gracious and returned them. I was incredibly grateful. He asked if he could keep one of them - the photo of the model of the church. I was happy to oblige. The photos are now back with the rest of my collection. I am very happy to have them back!

Here are those lost and found Polaroids from Larry’s collection featuring Tim Curry trying on his costume for Dr. Frankenfurter, some sets and other cast members (Richard O’Brien) from the production of The Rocky Horror Show.
 
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More, plus a behind-the scenes documentary on ‘Rocky Horror’ from 1975, after the jump….

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Posted by Paul Gallagher
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04.06.2016
09:19 am
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What have you done to BRAD? Meet the new ‘Rocky Horror Picture Show’ action figures
11.09.2015
08:26 am
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Rocky Horror Picture Show action figures by Funko (coming in December, 2015)
Rocky Horror Picture Show “Reaction” figures by Funko (coming in December, 2015)
 
As hard as it is to believe, 2015 is the 40th anniversary of one of the greatest cult films of all time, The Rocky Horror Picture Show.
 
Dr. Frank-N-Furter action figure by Funko
Dr. Frank-N-Furter “ReAction” figure by Funko
 
In addition to the latest collectible Blu-ray that was released in honor of this milestone in late September (which included pair of fishnet stockings and pink gloves as worn in the film by actor Tim Curry as “Dr. Frank-N-Furter, squeee!), Everett, Washington-based toy giant Funko is set to release six, fully poseable action figures based on characters from the beloved film. The collection (due out this December) includes the Dr. Frank-N-Furter, Riff Raff, Brad Majors, Janet Weiss, Riff Raff’s sister Magenta and glitter-loving groupie, Columbia. While the figures are not quite as cool as the set released by Vital Toys back in 2000 (which marked the films 25th anniversary - feel old yet?), I think that collectors and the hardcore fanbase that still lives for the 1975 flick, will quickly snap them up.

My only minor complaint about this set is the omission of Peter Hinwood’s character, the glammy hot-pants wearing creation of Dr. Frank-N-Furter, “Rocky Horror.” There’s also no Eddie (the ex-delivery boy played by forever Bat out of Hell, Meatloaf) but that’s just me being wishful that such things existed. Images of the fantastic plastic Rocky Horror figures follow.
 
Riff Raff
Riff Raff
 
Columbia
Columbia
 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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11.09.2015
08:26 am
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Is this the single time Tim Curry was willing to discuss ‘Rocky Horror’ at length?
11.20.2013
12:54 pm
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Fearing typecasting, Tim Curry notoriously shied away from discussing the role he’s most famous for—“Dr. Frank N. Furter” in The Rocky Horror Picture Show. He never did the fan conventions. Even at the late date of 2010, when fellow cast members Barry Bostwick and Meatloaf guest-starred on “The Rocky Horror Glee Show” episode of Glee, Curry still wanted no part of it, which is what makes this B&W interview shot in 1975, the week the film was released in Britain, so fascinating

This is probably the sole extended interview on video that Curry has ever given on the subject of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. He tells interviewer Mark Caldwell of the role’s physical demands, of reprising Rocky onstage in Los Angeles at The Roxy and how he tried to make the character more “evil” for the film version. When asked near the end if there would be a Rocky Horror sequel, Curry firmly deadpans “Not with me in it.”

In recent years, Curry, who had a major stroke in 2012, has been more open to talking about Rocky Horror.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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11.20.2013
12:54 pm
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On Location With ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show’ from 1975

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Richard O’Brien originally wrote The Rocky Horror Show to while away those long winter nights when he was out of work. There was, as he says in this interview from 1975, “no hardship with it really.” It all fell into place after he met director Jim Sharman at the Royal Court Theater, who encouraged him to “round it all off.” The musical was a hit and was produced successfully in LA and New York. As Tim Curry explains The Rocky Horror Show just grew just like Topsy.

Of course, it led to the classic 1975 film version, The Rocky Horror Picture Show from which this on location report comes, featuring Tim Curry, Richard O’Brien, Jim Sharman and co. from July of that year.
 

 
More from ‘The Rocky horror’, after the jump…
 

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Posted by Paul Gallagher
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09.28.2012
07:30 pm
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70s Michael Stipe in drag at ‘Rocky Horror’

 
Thanks, Marc Campbell!

Posted by Tara McGinley
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06.03.2010
02:12 am
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