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‘Real-life’ Marge Simpson is jaw-dropping (and kinda terrifying)


 
This is truly something else. And before you all yell “photoshop” and “fake”—I monitor the comments here on Dangerous Minds sometimes so I’m accustomed to all the usual comment tropes—it’s very real. Moscow-based photographer Alexander Khokhlov captures these extraordinary images with super-talented make-up artists, designers and expert lighting.

While this “real life” Marge Simpson is simply fascinating to look at, she’s still somewhat unsettling and terrifying, right?!?

There’s a video below showing you how Khokhlov and his team created Marge. I highly recommend muting the music. It’s godawful and distracting.

 
Via Geekologie

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Meet the real-life ‘Simpsons’ kids in a 1969 film made by Matt Groening’s father, Homer
01.30.2014
08:46 am

Topics:
Pop Culture

Tags:
The Simpsons
Matt Groening


He looks more like a “Bart,” don’t you think?

Fans of The Simpsons will enjoy “The Story,” a sweet short film made by Homer Groening in 1969. With a young Matt Groening and co-starring his sister Lisa, in “The Story,” a bedtime tale is told to their younger sister (that would be Maggie) about some encounters her siblings had in the woods with various animals.

The elder Groening, his name at least, immortalized by the Simpson’s doofus patriarch, was a war hero who flew a B-17 during WWII and participated in the D-Day invasion. He later became a prominent and award-winning advertising executive and made a series of films about water. Like his famous son, he was also a cartoonist and would make up the beginning of a story and then ask his children to finish it. Homer Groening died in 1996 at the age of 76.

Matt Groening told The Smithsonian magazine about how he came up with the idea for The Simpsons and why “Bart” wasn’t named Matt:

I had been drawing my weekly comic strip, “Life in Hell,” for about five years when I got a call from Jim Brooks, who was developing “The Tracey Ullman Show” for the brand-new Fox network. He wanted me to come in and pitch an idea for doing little cartoons on that show. I soon realized that whatever I pitched would not be owned by me, but would be owned by Fox, so I decided to keep my rabbits in “Life in Hell” and come up with something new.

While I was waiting—I believe they kept me waiting for over an hour—I very quickly drew the Simpsons family. I basically drew my own family. My father’s name is Homer. My mother’s name is Margaret. I have a sister Lisa and another sister Maggie, so I drew all of them. I was going to name the main character Matt, but I didn’t think it would go over well in a pitch meeting, so I changed the name to Bart.

Bart. Why?
Back in high school I wrote a novel about a character named Bart Simpson. I thought it was a very unusual name for a kid at the time. I had this idea of an angry father yelling “Bart,” and Bart sounds kind of like bark—like a barking dog. I thought it would sound funny. In my novel, Bart was the son of Homer Simpson. I took that name from a minor character in the novel The Day of the Locust, by Nathanael West. Since Homer was my father’s name, and I thought Simpson was a funny name in that it had the word “simp” in it, which is short for “simpleton”—I just went with it.

Did your father contribute anything besides his first name?
My father was a really sharp cartoonist and filmmaker. He used to tape-record the family surreptitiously, either while we were driving around or at dinner, and in 1963 he and I made up a story about a brother and a sister, Lisa and Matt, having an adventure out in the woods with animals. I told it to my sister Lisa, and she in turn told it to my sister Maggie. My father recorded the telling of the story by Lisa to Maggie, and then he used it as the soundtrack to a movie. So the idea of dramatizing the family—Lisa, Maggie, Matt—I think was the inspiration for doing something kind of autobiographical with “The Simpsons.” There is an aspect of the psychodynamics of my family in which it makes sense that one of us grew up and made a cartoon out of the family and had it shown all over the world.

 

 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Guillermo del Toro refused to insert a ‘Poochie’ into ‘Wind in the Willows’

The Itchy and Scratchy and Poochie Show!
 
For my money, “The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show,” episode #14 in the 8th season of The Simpsons, ranks as one of the most effortlessly resonant episodes they ever did. If you recall that one, the TV execs, worried about slipping ratings for “The Itchy & Scratchy Show,” decide to insert an “extreme” dog character named “Poochie” into the program. The surfboard-toting Poochie wears sunglasses, a backwards baseball cap, and torn shorts and generally behaves like the parody of edgy youth behavior he was intended to be. Eventually the kids start to hate Poochie because he always drags down the action, and they kill off the character. In a “meta” point to drive the point home, in the episode an additional, sassy Simpsons sibling named “Roy” materializes, whom all the characters acknowledge as always having been there.

The episode is studded with great dialogue, but here’s a bit in which all the relevant nonsense about Poochie is laid out in detail:
 

Network Executive Lady: We at the network want a dog with attitude. He’s edgy, he’s “in your face.” You’ve heard the expression, “let’s get busy”? Well, this is a dog who gets “biz-zay!” Consistently and thoroughly.

Krusty: So he’s proactive, huh?

Network Executive Lady: Oh, God, yes. We’re talking about a totally outrageous paradigm.

Writer: Excuse me, but “proactive” and “paradigm”? Aren’t these just buzzwords that dumb people use to sound important? Not that I’m accusing you of anything like that. [pause] I’m fired, aren’t I?

Roger Myers Jr.: Oh, yes.

 
The whole episode is a stone classic, and (in my mind at least, and I know I’m not alone) the word “Poochie” ever since has always been synonymous with gratuitous attempts to pander to audiences.

Everybody gets that Poochie-type behavior is a daily occurrence in Hollywood—but surely the makers of The Simpsons were exaggerating, right? To judge from the experience of Guillermo del Toro, apparently not!

Around 2003 del Toro was attached to a Disney animated adaptation of Kenneth Grahame’s 1905 children’s favorite The Wind in the Willows. In an interview from Rotten Tomatoes’ “Dinner and the Movies” series, del Toro revealed that he had to leave the project because of the Disney execs’ request to “Poochie” up the character of Toad:

Wind in the Willows, which I adapted to do animated. ... “The Piper at the Gates of Dawn” and all that - it was a beautiful little book, and then I went to meet with the executives and they said, “Could you give Toad a skateboard and make him say, ‘Radical, dude!’ things,” and that’s where I said, “It’s been a pleasure!”

The section with the Wind in the Willows stuff is embedded below, but you can watch the entire interview (12 files) if you like.

All in all, del Toro’s decisions to walk away from material—which happened often, apparently—seemed to work out well. He’s one of Hollywood’s most inventive and sought-after directors, and he just published a terrific book called Cabinet of Curiosities which we posted about a month ago.
 

 
Thank you Mark Davis!

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
If ‘Breaking Bad’ characters were on ‘The Simpsons’
10.10.2013
09:38 am

Topics:
Television

Tags:
Breaking Bad
The Simpsons

Walter White and Jesse Pinkman
Walter White and Jesse Pinkman
 
Brussels-based illustrator and art director Adrien Noterdaem loves to make Simpsons-ized versions of TV and movie characters. Recently he turned his attention to Breaking Bad and came up with these delightful images.

I would still like to see Lydia! and Tuco! and Gomie! and Badger! and Gale Boetticher! Much like meth addicts, Breaking Bad fans are not famous for ever being satisfied.
 
Walter White
Walter White
 
Skyler White
Skyler White
 
Hank Schrader
Hank Schrader

More after the jump…
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
‘No Prostitution’: The Simpsons instruct Chinese nightclub patrons on the house rules
09.05.2013
05:38 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
China
The Simpsons

Simpsons prostitution
 
While Disney and Looney Tunes probably have him beat on sheer numbers, Bart Simpson has to have been bootlegged more elaborately and creatively than any other animated character in history. There’s even a Facebook group called “Bootleg Bart,” that curates knock-off Simpsons merchandise and art. “Safer Sex Bartwas my favorite, until I stumbled across these janky little posters from a Chinese nightclub.

The imitation of Groening’s art is just a superficial design element. It doesn’t seem to matter to the illustrator that the posters are obvious bootlegs, because a legitimate association with The Simpsons as a brand obviously isn’t really the point. Still, I can’t help but enjoy the irony of America’s favorite dysfunctional family used to foster public decency in a Chinese bar. (No fighting? Really?)
 
Simpsons drugs
 
Simpsons fighting
 
Simpsons gambling
 
Via Buried Above Ground

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
Homer Simpson’s headstone?

nospmisremohevarg.jpg
 
A suitable gravestone for Homer Simpson…or, even Matt Groening, at some future date?
 
Previously on Dangerous MInds

‘Adamson’: The original Homer Simpson from 1949?


 
Via Tam O’Shanter and b3ta
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
‘Rich people feel things more deeply than the common man’: Mr. Burns explains the Fiscal Cliff
12.04.2012
03:16 pm

Topics:
Animation
Class War

Tags:
The Simpsons


 
Still feeling the pain from Mitt Romney’s loss—not even Karl Rove can comfort him—Mr. Burns explains how that fiscal cliff thing works in this PSA from The Simpsons.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Bootleg Bart Simpson ‘act ups’ for safer sex
11.21.2012
05:44 am

Topics:
Pop Culture
Queer

Tags:
The Simpsons
ACT UP

Bootleg Bart
“Wrap it up, man”
 
At the height of Simpsons-mania in the early 90’s, a wave of bootleg merchandisers made a mint off of black market Simpsons’ clothing and toys, all over the world. Bootleg Bart has been categorizing every bit of bootleg Simpsons merch it can find, and while I vaguely remember “Stoner-Barts” and “Rapper Barts,” this “ACT UP Bart” is officially the most esoteric Simpsons’ knock-off I’ve ever seen.

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
‘Adamson’: The original Homer Simpson from 1949?

adamson_homer_simpson_1949
 
Meet Adamson - a dead ringer for Homer Simpson, as published in Icelandic paper Fálkinn in July 1949.

Adamson was created by Swedish cartoonist Oscar Jacobsson, whose work was published successfully around the world. In America Adamson was known as Silent Sam, and had a considerable following. Was Adamson a possible influence on the look of Matt Groening’s Homer Simpson?
 
Adamson_cover
 
More pictures of Homer, d’oh, Adamson, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Homer Simpson votes Romney
09.20.2012
02:48 pm

Topics:
Animation
Politics

Tags:
The Simpsons


 
In this scene from Sunday’s upcoming premiere episode of The Simpsons, Homer casts his ballot for Mitt Romney… because “he invented Obamacare.”
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Who said it: Mitt Romney or Mr. Burns?


 
Ridicule is a good weapon to wield in a political campaign and one that an undignified buffoon like Thurston Howell III Mitt Romney is particularly vulnerable to.

So far the Obama campaign has been a pathetic, embarrassing shambles, of course, but whoever is producing his web ads is a comedic genius and should be given a raise and a promotion within the campaign organization, pronto!

(Or is it Thurston Howell III Mitt Romney who is the comedy genius?)
 

 
Via Think Progress

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
The Simpsons laughing it up in Chernobyl
04.04.2012
12:34 pm

Topics:
Art
Current Events

Tags:
The Simpsons
Chernobyl


 
A rather haunting—notice all those gas masks littered on the floor—mural of The Simpsons having a grand old time inside a building at the Chernobyl disaster site. The mural is by French street artist Combo.
 
Via Juxtapoz and KMFW

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Watching 100+ episodes of The Simpsons at the same time
03.24.2012
01:16 am

Topics:
Amusing
Animation
Pop Culture
Television

Tags:
The Simpsons


Electronic Superhighway
 
Pop culture keeps compressing more and more of itself into smaller and smaller bits of itself. The glittering Simpson video mosaic featured below makes avant-garde video pioneer Nam June Paik’s 1995 “Electronic Superhighway” installation (above) feel like a slow trip down the scenic back roads of central Kansas.

Life seems to have become that flickering thing at the periphery of our vision. Is this what “I saw my life flashing before my eyes” looks like?

Top to bottom: each row shows a season (from season 1 to season 10)
Left to right: each column shows an episode (from episode 1 to episode 13)

A total of 130 episodes is displayed, framerate is 25fps, thumbnails have been captured at 80x60px

And to think it all started with Hollywood Squares.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Have ‘The Simpsons’ Predicted a Nuclear Attack?  ...er, No

image
 
You know, once upon a time, conspiracy theories were fun, they usually had an element of something believable that hinted at a hidden world of secret organizations, forbidden knowledge, and funny handshakes. Nowadays, anyone can watch a TV show and come up with a half-baked theory. This one claims The Simpsons not only knew knew about 9/11 but have now predicted a nuclear attack that will hit mainland U.S.A. on the 6th November 2010.

Is there going to be a false flag nuclear explosion on November 6 2010? It might be predicted by hollywood, in the Simpsons, of all places. Does hollywood have elite insiders with knowledge of what they have planned for the world? If it happens, remember not to believe the lie the news tells you about who did it and why.

Well this time tomorrow night we’ll know, won’t we? No, wait, what’s this?

I am aware that it might be a stretch to say that the clock frame is the number 10. It’s possible that it isn’t, so the date could actually be 6/11 or 11/6 on any of the upcoming years.

O, great, the get-out clause.
 

 
With thanks to Maria Guimil
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
What has been seen cannot be unseen
08.29.2010
02:34 pm

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
The Simpsons

image
 
No comment.

(via Das Kraftfuttermischwerk)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
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