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Jello Biafra drumming in a punk band, 1979
09.14.2018
06:35 am
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Jello Biafra came to the aid of fellow punks at a show in 1979. For one song, captured on videotape, he manned the 4 Skins’ drum kit.

As will be immediately apparent, these are not the 4-Skins of Oi! fame, but an unrelated outfit from Portland, Oregon. Everything I know about these 4 Skins and their performance with Jello comes from the notes provided by the person who posted this on YouTube: Eddie Morgan, whose copy editor must be on vacation.

1979 the 4 skins opened for the dead kennedys,but there drummer at the time never showed up so jello biafra played the drums,,,,4 skins where a crazy young punk band from portland oregon ,with mark bar,Phil meanie and eddie jetson and the great sam henry on drums….sam played with the wipers,eddie started a band in san francisco called condemned to death,phil moved to new york ,,,and mark bar stayed in portland and played in many great bands…..video by Mike Lastra.

Given the striking resemblance of the backdrop and Biafra’s outfit in this clip to those in the widely bootlegged video of the Dead Kennedys’ Earth Tavern show in Portland on November 19, 1979—also directed by Mike Lastra of Smegma—I think we know when and where this was shot. It would also be a shocking coincidence if the Eddie Morgan who posted this on YouTube turned out to be a different person than the Eddie Morgan who sang in a Portland punk band under the name Eddie Jetson.

Incidentally, have you ever heard David Thomas of Pere Ubu play guitar on the Pagans’ “Boy Can I Dance Good”?
 

Posted by Oliver Hall
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09.14.2018
06:35 am
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Burning down the house: The Flaming Lips play a ‘fiery’ show and are rewarded with a record contract
09.13.2018
06:41 pm
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The Flaming Lips 1
 
In the fall of 1990 the Flaming Lips played an incredible, legendary show. That night there was danger in the air, and the band nearly burned the place down—literally. It was a time of new beginnings for the group, and that evening marked another such occasion.

The fourth Flaming Lips album, In a Priest Driven Ambulance (With Silver Sunshine Stares), is the first record the band made that resembles the Lips we know today. The LP featured two new members: Nathan Roberts (drums) and Jonathan Donahue (lead guitar). Donahue was also in the recently formed avant-pop group, Mercury Rev. With the Priest song “Unconsciously Screamin,” the reborn Flaming Lips made it crystal clear that they were now swimming in uncharted sonic waters. “We’re not what we used to be,” indeed.
 

 
Priest was released in September 1990 by the indie label Restless Records, but not long after the LP dropped, Restless went under. Though now without a contract and free to sign with another company, the Flaming Lips hadn’t much considered the idea of hooking up with a major label, though they’d soon get their chance.

On October 17th, 1990, the Lips played what’s remembered as one of the wildest shows they’ve ever done. Taking place at a Norman, Oklahoma club called Rome, their blazing set included material from Priest, as well as two disparate covers: The Dead Boys’ “Sonic Reducer,” and the Bee Gees’ “Every Christian Lion Hearted Man Will Show You”—all at deafening volume—but that’s not the half of it. In his book, Staring at Sound: The True Story of Oklahoma’s Fabulous Flaming Lips, author Jim DeRogatis describes the madness of the evening:

The Flaming Lips had borrowed one of the Butthole Surfers’ most striking effects, which involved filling an upside-down cymbal with alcohol. The band’s friend George Salisbury lit “the Flames of Destiny” and struck the cymbal, sending burning alcohol shooting everywhere and setting himself on fire. A panicked club staffer doused him with an extinguisher, prompting Wayne [Coyne, singer/guitarist] to crack, “I’d rather burn to death than be sprayed with that shit.”

The group had staged the show fully aware that a representative from Warner Bros. Records would be in attendance. Roberta Petersen was an industry veteran and a Lips fan; she flew into town specifically to see them.

“It was the most incredible show. I was mesmerized. I really, truly was, and then they did this thing where they set something on fire. That didn’t work for me—I thought the place was going to burn down—but I also thought, ‘This is a band I’ve got to have. If there’s a fire, I’m gonna die here, but that’s okay. I just wanna die with this band.’” (from Staring at Sound)

 
The Flaming Lips 2
 
After the gig, Peterson bought the Flaming Lips dinner at a restaurant chosen by the group—Denny’s. Once there, Peterson made her intentions known—she wanted to sign them.

Roberts and Donahue would depart after the recording of the Lips’ major label debut, and the group has subsequently been through a number of lineup changes over the years, but the band soldiers on. It’s now been nearly 30 years since that fateful, fiery night in Norman, and Warner Bros. is still releasing new records by the Flaming Lips.
 

 
Much more early Flaming Lips after the jump…

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Posted by Bart Bealmear
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09.13.2018
06:41 pm
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Billy Idol and Dr. Timothy Leary jamming in the studio
09.13.2018
08:30 am
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“Outlaw Tech. Rebel Science. Information is the ammunition, your mind is the target.”

Cyberpunk entered the world borne on gusts of hype. Billy Idol’s previous three albums and the greatest-hits comp Vital Idol had all been certified platinum, and the term “cyberpunk” was strained by heavy use in 1993, invoked to explain such disparate cultural phenomena as Ministry, Freejack, the Bomb Squad, white-guy dreads and the 14.4K modem. Maybe Mr. “Eyes Without A Face” could square this circle. Who better to explain cyberpunk’s continuity with paleopunk? After all, hadn’t his first band been called “Generation X,” another buzzword of the day? If you’re a record executive, you’re going to let Billy have all the binaural recording equipment, Stan Winston special effects and rails of GHB he wants.

Except for those nine dance versions of the Velvet Underground’s “Heroin,” Idol’s instincts were solid. The CD and its accompanying interactive press kit on 3.5-inch floppy incorporated the talents of some heavy hitters. However, despite the cover art by bOING bOING’s Mark Frauenfelder, the bass playing by Doug Wimbish, the remake of Blue Pearl’s “Mother Dawn,” and the participation and blessing of arch-cyberpunk Timothy Leary, Cyberpunk sank like a Macintosh Performa tossed on a leaky waterbed. (Don’t let anyone tell you it’s Billy Idol’s worst record, though.)

A couple GHB overdoses later, Billy lost the white-guy dreads and returned to his former shtick; a decade passed before he issued a new LP.

More after the jump…

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Posted by Oliver Hall
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09.13.2018
08:30 am
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Captain Beefheart loses his shit during tumultuous 1975 gig opening for Frank Zappa
09.12.2018
03:40 pm
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Captain Beefheart
 
By late 1975, Captain Beefheart’s career was on the rebound. After two albums aimed at a mainstream audience failed to sell, and the dissolution of his Magic Band, he reached out to his old friend, Frank Zappa. Beefheart subsequently joined FZ’s latest incarnation of the Mothers of Invention for a tour and the Bongo Fury album. Then, as part of his desire to return to his avant-rock roots, he revived the Magic Band. But just because things were on the upswing, the notoriously cantankerous Captain didn’t always keep his cool. 

After the Bongo Fury outing was complete, Beefheart recruited members of the Mothers and convinced a couple of Magic Band veterans to come back into the fold. In October, the new Magic Band hit the road, playing classic Beefheart tracks (his recent, commercially-minded material was ignored) for audiences across Europe and the States. A handful of dates opening for Zappa would take place during the last week of the year.
 
Clipping
 
The December 27th gig was held at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. The concert was noteworthy for the Captain’s heated exchanges with the crowd. Beefheart had quite the temper and had confronted audiences before, but this was something else altogether. Years later, members of the Magic Band would recount what transpired. Here’s guitarist Denny Walley:

That [gig] was memorable to me because that was the one where the audience started booing and throwing things at us, after Don [Don Van Vliet is Captain Beefheart’s real name] had given the finger to somebody. Somebody had given the finger to him. Frank was the headliner. We had opened for him. Frank used to give the finger a lot—to the audience—it was a way of saying “Hi!” To Don, it was a way of saying, “Fuck You!” So, he god pissed off and got right in the guy’s face with it, and the next thing you know a lot of people were angry, and they started booing and throwing shit.

It was constant heckling and stuff. (taken from Beefheart: Through the Eyes of Magic)

During a 2000 Q&A, multi-instrumentalist and the Magic Band’s musical director, John French, had this to say about what happened that night:

Don “gave the finger” to the guy in an insulting way, got right in his face and started hurtling insults to the audience. The objective of this behavior seemed to be to intentionally provoke the audience. People were throwing objects at the stage. I was upset with Don for not just ignoring the guy and performing. Don eventually left the stage. We played “Alice in Blunderland” and appeased the crowd a bit, but as soon as Don came back up, they became hostile again.

Afterwards, we walked into the dressing room, which was completely dark. Don had broken out all the lights. Every light in the dressing room was broken, and there were shards of glass everywhere. He was saying “I wanted the audience to do that, man! That was exactly what I wanted them to do!” It was a very unnerving evening, but certainly not the first time Don had managed to alienate an entire crowd.

 
Winterland
Captain Beefheart on stage at Winterland, December 27th, 1975.

While an audience tape of the Winterland performance has circulated online, it doesn’t sound that great. But recently, audio sourced from a first generation cassette surfaced. It was provided by an anonymous collector who says he obtained his copy from the taper of the show not long after the concert. This collector also added that the person who recorded it was none other than Matt Groening—the future creator of The Simpsons! Groening is a big Beefheart fan, and is believed to have recorded a number of the Captain’s Bay Area performances.
 
Matt Groening
 
The Magic Band lineup:

Captain Beefheart: vocals, saxophone, harmonica
Drumbo John French: drums, percussion, guitar (on “Dali’s Car”)
Bruce Fossil Fowler: air bass (trombone)
Winged Eel Fingerling Elliot Ingber: guitar, slide guitar
Feeler’s Reedo/Walla Walla Denny Walley: guitar, slide guitar
 
DiscReet promo photo
L-R: Ingber, Beefheart, Walley, Fowler, French (front).

The setlist:

01. Introduction
02. Moonlight On Vermont
03. Abba Zaba
04. Orange Claw Hammer
05. Don addresses the audience
06. Dali’s Car
07. When It Blows It Stacks
08. My Human Gets Me Blues
09. Band introductions
10. Alice In Blunderland
11. Untitled improvisations
12. Electricity
13. Golden Birdies
14. Big Eyed Beans From Venus

The audio is clearer than other versions of the gig, with speed and volume adjustments. The show’s drama is first heard before “Orange Claw Hammer.” During his band introductions, the Captain hurls his own brand of insults at the crowd, including this humdinger: “It’s like playing for a jar of pickles and trying to turn them back into cucumbers.” 

HA!
 

 
Matt Groening on how he came to love Trout Mask Replica:
 

Posted by Bart Bealmear
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09.12.2018
03:40 pm
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Hang ‘em high: The story of John Edward Allen, Ozzy Osbourne’s “personal dwarf”
09.12.2018
11:20 am
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The gatefold image from ‘Speak of the Devil’ featuring Ozzy and John Edward Allen as Ronnie the Dwarf (also sometimes called Ronnie the Midget). For what it’s worth, this photograph was unapologetically taken of the author’s original U.S. pressing of the album from 1982.
 
While on tour in support of both Diary of a Madman (1981-1982), and his follow-up live album, Speak of the Devil (1982-1983), Ozzy Osbourne‘s live show included actor and dwarf John Edward Allen. You may recall Allen not only participated in the live shows but also appeared on the inside of the infamous gatefold (pictured above) of the Speak of the Devil album, made up to look like a bloody, undead disciple of Ozzy clad in a hooded black robe. My young mind could barely handle the image when I cracked my copy open on Christmas of 1982 (proof my parents are the coolest ever). I even got to see Ozzy “execute” Allen on stage by hanging him as he did nightly, typically when it came time to perform “Goodbye To Romance” from Osbourne’s first solo record, Blizzard of Ozz. During the band’s set, Allen would periodically come out on stage during the banter breaks, bringing his employer drinks and towels while Ozz regaled the crowd with his never-ending demand to let him see their “fucking hands.”

John Edward Allen was born on March 27th, 1950, in Southampton, Hampshire, England. He found work as a tailor in Southhampton but always had his sights set on acting. He would fulfill his dream performing live theater in London first, then heading to New York’s off-Broadway scene—even performing for President Jimmy Carter at the White House in the late 70s. Allen landed parts in several Hollywood films starting in 1978 with his minor role in the super-creepy John Carpenter-penned film The Eyes of Laura Mars. Other roles would follow, including his memorable portrayal of Kaiser in 1982’s Blade Runner. While all this sounds like a pretty charming existence for Allen, he was a pretty troubled guy. Allen, as it turns out, loved to drink, about as much as Ozzy himself liked to drink—which in itself is an alarming claim to make about anyone considering Osbourne’s track record with booze.

Initially, Ozzy was hell-bent on adding a dwarf to his live show and gave Allen the gig giving him the name of Ronnie the Dwarf—a direct swipe at Black Sabbath’s new vocalist Ronnie James Dio. Between Ozzy’s epic use of party favors and Allen’s love of drink, things often ended badly for Allen after the show was over.
 

A lovely portrait of Allen in his dressing room in 1985. Photo by author and photographer Mary Motley Kalergis.
 
On one particular occasion, Ozzy was chatting with a journalist outside the band’s tour bus when a seriously blotto Allen came stumbling by. This pissed off the Prince of Darkness and once Allen was within arms reach, he grabbed him and threw him inside the luggage compartment of the bus, leaning on the door so Allen couldn’t get out. The journo recoiled in shock (which I find hilarious, because OZZY), then stammered at Osbourne telling him his treatment of Allen was uncalled for.  Ozzy allegedly responded by telling the journalist he could do “what he liked with him” because he was “my dwarf.” Following this bizarre proclamation, Allen’s voice arose from the luggage compartment saying:

“He’s right, you know. I’m his dwarf, and he can do what he likes with me…”

During the North American leg of the Diary of a Madman Tour, tragedy struck when guitarist Randy Rhoads (and four other people including the pilot) was killed in a plane crash on March 19th, 1982. This devastating event sent Ozzy into an even more downward spiral. He upped his consumption of liquor and drugs, shaved his head, and constantly threatened to quit the music game forever. Of course, as we all know, the threats never came to fruition and Ozzy would keep going. Allen would continue to be ceremoniously hanged for the duration of the Speak of the Devil Tour. Following the tour, Allen was dismissed by either Osbourne, a member of his crew, or perhaps just moved on—it’s a little murky. Allen would appear in a few more films before his OD suicide in 1999 at the young age of 49. I’ve posted some behind-the-scenes images of Allen on tour with Ozzy, as well as a video of Allen on stage with Ozzy in 1982.

And now, you know...
 

A photo of Allen preparing to be hung on stage during his time touring with Ozzy.
 

 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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09.12.2018
11:20 am
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Animated children’s stories by Nick Cave, Gary Numan, Will Oldham, Tom Waits, Laura Marling & more!
09.12.2018
08:44 am
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Cover illustration by Daniel Nayeri

Stories for Ways and Means is a new book that features original “grown up” children’s story collaborations by some of this era’s most compelling storytellers from the worlds of music and contemporary art. It’s being published by the long-running indie record label Waxploitation run by entrepreneur and photojournalist Jeff Antebi. The Stories for Ways and Means project lends support to several non-governmental organizations and nonprofit groups aiding children’s literacy causes around the world including Room to Read, Pencils of Promise, 826 National and many more.

Some of the featured musicians contributing to the project include Frank Black, Laura Marling, Del the Funky Homosapien, Gibby Haynes, Alec Empire, Kathleen Hanna, Devendra Banhart, Nick Cave, Alison Mosshart, Satomi Matsuzaki of Deerhoof, Will Oldham, Gary Numan and ska great, guitarist Ernest Ranglin.

You can order the Stories for Ways and Means book at SFWAM.org
 

“The Lonely Giant,” narrated by Andre Royo (The Wire), written by Nick Cave, illustrated by Anthony Lister.
 
Many more after the jump…

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Posted by Richard Metzger
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09.12.2018
08:44 am
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The bawdy, bizarre (and sometimes bloody) ceramics of Barnaby Barford
09.11.2018
09:05 am
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“How Else Am I Gonna Learn?” by Barnaby Barford, 2011. 
 

“Ceramic is a fascinating material, it is steeped in such a rich history, and we have a unique relationship with it as a tactile material. We eat and drink from it every day, we decorate our houses with it, but we do not expect to be challenged by it, which is precisely what makes it fun to play with.”

—British artist Barnaby Barford on his preferred medium, ceramics.

Once he stepped into the creative realm, it didn’t take long for Barnaby Barford to discover an artistic medium which would allow him to create virtually “any form he wanted.” The material was ceramics and Barford would spend several years at various art schools and institutes including The Higher Institute for Artistic Industries in Faenza, Italy which specializes in the exploration and manipulation of ceramics. Barford has created a wide range of works such as an eight-foot polar bear made from 7,500 different pieces of porcelain (and other materials), and his legendary twenty-foot high “Tower of Babel.”

For this post, we will be diving deep into Barford’s world of wildly debaucherous and irreverent ceramic figures, which he has been creating for well over a decade. Many of Barford’s ceramic figures are presented as purveyors of perversion and violence. They are voyeuristic, and Barford’s little ceramic trouble-makers are meant to convey the artist’s observations of his fellow humans and what makes us all tick, or, perhaps, how we might behave when we get ticked off or turned on. Here’s Barford from an interview in 2016 talking about what sparks his creative process:

“Inspiration comes from everywhere—looking, seeing, listening, living. The human condition is the thread of inquiry connecting all my work, which means current affairs often influence me. How do we live now? What is happening now? Our hopes, dreams, aspirations, and, of course, our failures, fears, and frailties. Then finding parallels within history and questioning if we have always been like this? Will we always be like this?”

Barford’s creations have been displayed in galleries and museums all around the world, and it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand why once you become acquainted with his diverse body of work. Of course, since I follow the lead of my deviant heart, I choose to feature Barford’s subversive ceramic figures, as I’m sure you are going to wish you could have one of your very own. If owning one of Barford’s original pieces is now a goal in your life, many pieces from his “Tower of Babel” (an interpretation of London’s many heterogeneous shops) can be purchased here for anywhere from $230 to $7,900. Some of the images that follow are NSFW.
 

“Mary had a little lamb” 2007.
 

“Hell Hath No Fury Like a Woman Scorned.”
 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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09.11.2018
09:05 am
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The extraordinary work of Frank Kelly Freas, the Dean of Science Fiction Art
09.10.2018
07:08 am
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“Just Around the Corner” by Frank Kelly Freas. This painting appeared on the cover of Fantastic Universe Science Fiction in 1955.
 
Frank Kelly Freas was known as the “Dean of Science Fiction Art,” and was the second artist to be inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. For fifty years Freas’ work appeared in all kinds of science fiction publications beginning with his first sale to Weird Tales in 1950. In 1957, Freas would hook up with MAD magazine painting nearly every cover of MAD until 1962. His spectacular artwork has appeared on the covers of books by some of sci-fi’s most celebrated authors such as Poul Anderson, Robert Heinlein, and Isaac Asimov. He has been nominated for the prestigious Hugo Award twenty times—winning eleven—more than any other artist in history. In addition to his work in sci-fi, Freas also contributed to another organization obsessed with outer space—NASA—and many of Freas’ posters done for NASA hang in the Smithsonian. Lastly, if you still need to be convinced of Freas’ impact to the art world, he also collaborated with Queen in 1977 at the request of Queen drummer, Roger Taylor.

According to Taylor, he pitched the idea of using Freas’ artwork of a giant robot called “The Gulf Between” from the cover of an issue of Amazing Science Fiction published in October of 1953. After reaching out to Freas, the artist agreed to paint the cover for the band’s 1977 album News of the World with a few modifications. For the album cover, the robot, named Frank, naturally, is clutching the lifeless, bloody bodies of Freddie Mercury and Brian May, while poor John Deacon and Roger Taylor (Taylor is pictured on the back of the album) fall to the ground. In addition to the iconic album cover, Freas also created the poster artwork featuring his menacing robot for the News of the World Tour. And since I’m a special kind of Queen nerd, I should mention, to help further promote the record in the UK, EMI created a small number of four-and-a-half-foot Franks to be used as record displays in high-end record stores. In 1997 Sideshow Collectables put out a God Of The Robots Model Kit based on Frank—which is, sadly, nearly impossible to find just like the record store promotional Frank.

Much of Freas’ extraordinary work has been published in two books, 1978’s The Art of Science Fiction, and the 2000 book Frank Kelly Freas: As He Sees It.
 

1959.
 

1954.
 

 
Much more after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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09.10.2018
07:08 am
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‘It takes a little courage’: An interview with ‘Gimme Shelter’ filmmaker Albert Maysles
09.10.2018
06:08 am
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01mayslestw.jpg
 
It Takes a Little More Courage is the title and opening line to a brief, all too brief, conversation with documentarian Albert Maysles (1926-2015) filmed by Alfonso Nogueroles in 2012

The gravel-voiced Maysles (pronounced May-zuls) quickly riffed on his work with brother David (1931-87) and discussed what it is needed to make a good documentary—stories.

The Maysles brothers pioneered a brand of documentary-making called Direct Cinema in which they allowed the film’s subjects to speak freely, directly, for themselves without any questions or commentary. The main inspiration for their style of filmmaking came from a rather unlikely source—Truman Capote’s non-fiction novel In Cold Blood. This book led the Maysles to “experiment in film the way Capote had experimented in literature,” or as Albert Maysles later described it:

Making a film isn’t finding the answer to a question; it’s trying to capture life as it is.

Both brothers studied psychology at Boston University and after graduating Albert went onto document psychiatric conditions in Russia, while David moved into working in Hollywood as a production assistant. David grew “disenchanted” with conventional film-making and together with Albert the brothers began making their own documentary films with David on sound and Albert on camera. Their first works together were Russian Close-Up (although only credited to Albert Maysles) and Youth in Poland. Then in 1960, the brothers joined photojournalist Robert Drew’s film company where they worked on projects alongside the likes of Richard Leacock and D. A. Pennebaker. After filming Truman Capote for the launch of his novelized work of non-fiction In Cold Blood (1966), the brothers decided to approach filmmaking in the same way Capote had documented the quadruple murder of the Clutter family in Holcomb, Kansas, in 1959 by Richard “Dick” Hickock and Perry Smith, and detailed their subsequent trial and execution. Taking Capote’s book as their inspiration, the Maysles went onto create a new kind of revelatory documentary where the story seemingly developed organically. Their works included a look at the business of door-to-door Bible salesmen, Salesman (1969), the Rolling Stones’ fateful appearance at Altamont Gimme Shelter (1970), and the lives of two reclusive upper middle class women, a mother and daughter, who lived together on a derelict estate Grey Gardens (1976). Each of these films changed the way filmmakers thought about and made documentaries.

Nogueroles’s short film It Takes a Little More Courage is a bit like a student project and leaves you wondering how much interview was shot and how much was was edited out. On the up side, it leaves you wanting to go back and watch some of those old Maysles’ masterworks.
 

 

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
‘Death Is Their Destiny’: Home-movies of London punks 1978-81
‘Psychiatry in Russia’: Albert Maysles’ first documentary, 1955
William Burroughs’ cold-blooded letter to Truman Capote

Posted by Paul Gallagher
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09.10.2018
06:08 am
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John, Yoko and Jerry Lewis play reggae on the MDA Telethon
09.07.2018
07:51 am
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John, Yoko, and the Nutty Beatle

This was once the time of year Harry Shearer called Telethon Season. Back-to-school sales coincided with the annual broadcast of the Jerry Lewis Telethon, whose host would come totally unglued over the show’s 21-plus hours, sobbing, geshreying and fulminating against his critics in the press.

But the golden age of telethons is over, and the show people who gave of themselves until we begged them to stop are mostly dead. The Chabad telethon still happens, but even if I could find it on the cable box (LA has a channel 18?), it wouldn’t be the same without Harry Dean Stanton and Bob Dylan playing “Hava Nagila” together, or my own sainted grandfather cutting up beneath the tote board.
 

 
So I was delighted to come across this clip of John and Yoko’s performance on the 1972 Jerry Lewis Telethon, even though Lennon biographer (and emeritus history professor and Nation contributor) Jon Wiener identifies this moment as the nadir of Lennon’s life in showbiz. The Nixon administration was then aggressively trying to have Lennon deported, and he and Yoko hoped the appearance would help them remain in the country, Wiener writes:

Before and after John and Yoko appeared, Jerry Lewis went through his telethon shtick, making maudlin appeals for cash, alternately mugging and weeping, parading victims of muscular dystrophy across the Las Vegas stage, and generally claiming to be the friend to the sick. Most offensive of all was his cuddling up to corporate America. Public-relations men from United Airlines, McDonald’s, Anheuser-Busch, and others appeared to hand Jerry checks. He responded by pontificating about what wonderful friends we all have in the corporations.

John and Yoko permitted themselves to be exploited in this way because they were trying to clean up their act, to impress the immigration authorities that they were good citizens. And, to be fair, many big stars went on the telethon; Paul and Ringo did in subsequent years. However, there were other points where John and Yoko could have stopped on their way from Jerry Rubin to Jerry Lewis.

 

 
Below, backed by Elephant’s Memory, John and Yoko play “Imagine,” “Now or Never,” and a reggae arrangement of “Give Peace a Chance.” Jerry Lewis blows his trumpet on the last number.
 

Posted by Oliver Hall
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09.07.2018
07:51 am
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