FOLLOW US ON:
GET THE NEWSLETTER
CONTACT US
‘Love Buzz’: The psychedelic sounds of Dutch rock superstars Shocking Blue
05.10.2018
04:51 pm
Topics:
Tags:


Dutch band Shocking Blue.
 
On February 7th, 1970 the number one song on the Billboard Chart was “Venus” by Dutch band Shocking Blue, which the band released as a single in late 1969. Tom Jones quickly followed with his own cover of “Venus” on a self-titled compilation album put out by Decca in 1970. Sixteen years later, Bananarama got the top spot on the Billboard Charts with their energetic version of “Venus.” The weird kids loved Shocking Blue, too: Krist Novoselic of Nirvana was once quoted referring to Shocking Blue’s Klaasje van der Wal as “a bass god.” Compliments don’t get much better than that, do they? In fact, Nirvana’s very first single on Sub Pop was a cover of Shocking Blue’s “Love Buzz.” The Prodigy also covered the song with samples from the original song.

Shocking Blue experienced a lot of success thanks to “Venus,” “Mighty Joe,” and many of their other psychedelically-tinged singles, though “Love Buzz” really didn’t get through to their fans—but vocalist Mariska Veres did. Veres’ voice had both the deep, sensual tones of Cher, and a strong similarity to Jefferson Airplane powerhouse, Grace Slick. Veres’ good looks didn’t exactly hurt the band’s popularity either. Known for her long black hair (which was in truth an incredible wig), huge green eyes enhanced by massive lashes and black eyeliner, and her groovy outfits, Veres was impossible to ignore. After replacing original Shocking Blue singer, Fred de Wilde, Veres would help the band score their first gold record with the success of “Venus.” Veres wasn’t new to rock and roll when she joined Shocking Blue at the age of 21; she had been performing with bands in and around The Hague since she was sixteen. Shocking Blue hung around until 1974 when the band called it a day. Veres dove directly into a solo career but wasn’t able to recapture the same hit-making magic as her collaboration with Shocking Blue produced.

Mariska Veres was sadly lost at the way-too-young age of 59 in 2006.
 

Veres posing with a gold record in Amsterdam.
 
Much more after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Cherrybomb
|
05.10.2018
04:51 pm
|
Tricia Nixon’s wedding travestied by the Cockettes, 1971
05.10.2018
08:28 am
Topics:
Tags:


via IMDb
 
Tricia’s Wedding, a 33-minute dramatization of the solemn rite that joined Patricia Nixon and Edward Cox in holy matrimony, was the first movie the Cockettes made. Per Kenneth Turan, it premiered at the Palace Theater in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco on the very day of the happy event, June 12, 1971. Not only is the Cockettes’ movie much livelier than the televised ceremony, it includes the all-too-brief screen debut of Tomata du Plenty, some five years before he formed the Screamers in Los Angeles.

Incredibly, the Cockettes’ movie was screened in the Nixon White House. In Blind Ambition, John Dean mentions watching it in the president’s bomb shelter underneath the East Wing, John Ehrlichman’s favorite spot for “monitoring” protests. There, Dean saw Tricia’s Wedding on the orders of H.R. “Bob” Haldeman:

I knew I wouldn’t use the shelter for monitoring demonstrations, although Haldeman had told me that that would be one of my responsibilities. The only time I ever returned there was for a secret screening of Tricia’s Wedding, a pornographic movie portraying Tricia Nixon’s wedding to Edward Cox, in drag. Haldeman wanted the movie killed, so a very small group of White House officials watched the cavorting transvestites in order to weigh the case for suppression. Official action proved unnecessary; the film died a natural death.

Continues after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Oliver Hall
|
05.10.2018
08:28 am
|
Meditate, breathe: These comics bring a much-needed moment of peace to our stressful, chaotic world
05.09.2018
11:22 am
Topics:
Tags:

01cohendna.jpg
 
Do you suffer from tense, nervous headaches? Are you sometimes overwhelmed by the demands of modern life? Do you feel sad, lonely, and isolated from those around you? Then maybe it’s time to take a moment of quiet reflection in the comic strip art of Evan Matthew Cohen.

Cohen’s strips depict some of the fears, stresses, anxieties, and delusions that hinder us from connecting with ourselves and with the world. The noises of distraction caused by a fractured city life, the constant bombardment of social media and the relentless march of information technology. His illustrations highlight the way many people feel about their lives and offer a possible way to rediscover some small amount of peace of mind.

Based in New York, Cohen works as a professional illustrator and artist producing work for commission alongside work for his own comic strips, books, and posters. He creates his peace-strips to help himself and hopefully others feel “connected and comfortable with the world,” where the constant noise of modern life can be equally balanced by mindfulness and enlightenment.

See more of Evan M. Cohen’s work here or buy prints, books, and badges here.
 
03cohengoldmorn.jpg
 
04cohen.jpg
 
More of Evan M. Cohen’s peace strips, after the jump…
 

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
|
05.09.2018
11:22 am
|
Exclusive first look at ‘Sparkle Hard,’ a short film documenting Stephen Malkmus’ goofy life
05.09.2018
08:46 am
Topics:
Tags:


 
For an indie rocker, Stephen Malkmus has been unusually wiling to fiddle with sports metaphors in his music, from the fractured high school football rah-rah of “Feed em to the Lions (Linden)” to the curiously combative tennis folderol of “Stop Breathing” to the chooglin’ football/relationship ditty “Rattled by the Rush,” the video for which was skewered by no less an authority on the strenuous life than Beavis and Butthead for insufficient effort (“I want you start over again, and this time try”).

What I was trying to say was, you’ve always known that Stephen Malkmus has a solid tennis game, and after you’re done with this post you’ll have proof. Today marks the release of a 10-minute promotional documentary of sorts that can also serve as the trailer to Malkmus’ sixth album with the Jicks (surpassing Pavement, if we’re measuring by full-lengths), which is called Sparkle Hard. And the framing device for the movie is footage of Malkmus working on his groundstrokes in his adopted home of Portland.

Malkmus has never transmitted an undue amount of implied tension as a frontman for two reliable-and-then-some indie rock units, and early on in the doc, he confesses that the offhandedness of his approach is still with him: 
 

I write songs all the time, but I’m beyond just like, getting through stuff or putting stuff out because of some sort of compulsion of creativity. I mean I just try to make it interesting for myself, right? It has to have a reason.

 
Indeed. Malkmus was not put on this earth to bend to any “compulsions of creativity”—it’s part of his considerable charm. If the music of Pavement and the Jicks has sometimes lacked urgency, it has more than made up for it in tunefulness, noise, wordplay, and most particularly slack.
 

 
Few human beings have given me more musical pleasure, nor shaped my musical horizons, as much as Malkmus has. But those who marveled at the abrasive dada enigmas of Demolition Plot J-7 weren’t necessarily expecting that particular band to end up channeling Fleetwood Mac (”Fin”) and indulging in the 70s jumble of Terror Twilight. Malkmus was looking for something, and didn’t really care how long it took.

Sparkle Hard, which is set to be released in nine days, sounds pleasingly focused for a songwriter who likes to meander. There’s a song with the very Portland title of “Bike Lane,” that’s one of the good ones, wouldn’t sound out of place on Brighten the Corners.

There’s some urgency here. Malkmus appears to have found a reason.

More bands should put out album trailers like this one (directed by Brook Linder), it has the offhand vibe of incidental footage culled from the set of Help!
 

 

Posted by Martin Schneider
|
05.09.2018
08:46 am
|
Serge Gainsbourg’s pop art science-fiction cartoon ‘Marie Mathématique’
05.08.2018
03:18 pm
Topics:
Tags:


 
Incroyable! Hosting the legendary French pop show Dim Dam Dom in 1965, Sandie Shaw introduces the first installment of “Marie Mathématique,” an animated short made by “Barbarella” creator Jean-Claude Forest. Serge Gainsbourg wrote the music and sang André Ruellan’s lyrics. The Marie character is the younger sister of Barbarella—she’s sixteen—and her adventures take place in the year 2830.

In total, there were six installments of “Marie Mathématique.” There was never a proper soundtrack release, but it was bootlegged.
 

 

Another five episodes of “Marie Mathématique,” after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Richard Metzger
|
05.08.2018
03:18 pm
|
Nina Simone at Montreux 1976: ‘Everybody took a chunk of me’
05.08.2018
11:09 am
Topics:
Tags:


 
Few musicians put as much of themselves into their performances as Nina Simone. Even by her standards, however, the concert she gave for the attendees of the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland on July 3, 1976, was an especially vivid display of temperament, humor, frustration, and frayed emotion.

That evening, Simone set the tone early. Her first words after taking her seat at the piano, before breaking into a rendition of the Rodgers and Hart standard “Little Girl Blue” put the audience on notice:
 

I haven’t seen you for many years since—1968. I have decided I will do no more jazz festivals. That decision has not changed. I will sing for you—or we will do and share with you a few things. After that I will graduate to a higher class I hope and hope you will come with me. We’ll start from the beginning.


 
Simone’s haughtiness and general emotionality does not diminish throughout the set. At one point, she is obliged to tussle with a misbehaving mic stand—the moment (eventually) becomes quite funny. Before one song, Simone admonishes any listener who might threaten to relegate her, at that moment a resident of Liberia, to the category of just another ignorant black artist: “I do speak French, you know. I am not like all those black musicians who come over here and get locked into their own thing and never speak one worrrrd,” moments before praising Montreux and its “terrible, wonderful peacefulness. It permeates everything that is here. It attracts me and holds me, and I hope that I’m permitted to stay amongst you for a little while.”

In one odd moment, Simone belligerently demands to ascertain the whereabouts of David Bowie, who had recently moved to nearby Blonay—she becomes irritated to learn that he’s not in the house. (Two years earlier, Bowie and Simone had developed a tolerably intense friendship, conducted mostly on the telephone, during which Bowie helped her get out of an emotional funk. Simone said of the relationship, “He told me that he was not a gifted singer and he knew it. He said, ‘What’s wrong with you is you were gifted—you have to play. Your genius overshadows the money, and you don’t know what to do to get your money, whereas I wasn’t a genius, but I planned, I wanted to be a rock-and-roll singer and I just got the right formula.’”)

Continues after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Martin Schneider
|
05.08.2018
11:09 am
|
Of Skank Kids, Germs and Circle Jerks: The influential punk art & comics of Shawn Kerri
05.08.2018
10:57 am
Topics:
Tags:


A flyer by artist Shawn Kerri for the Circle Jerks from 1981
 

“I’ve never gotten the same thrill out of having one of my cartoons printed in a magazine as much as seeing one of my old fliers — something I did for a punk gig the week before — laying in the gutter. Seeing it all mashed and dirty thrilled me, because that was how I was living, too. It looked exactly like my life.”

—artist Shawn Kerri

Artist Shawn Kerri (Shawn Maureen Fitzgerald) spent most of her life growing up near San Diego before taking off to make a name for herself in Los Angeles. Kerri was just nineteen when she showed up at the office of CARtoons magazine looking for work and quickly became one of the magazine’s only female illustrators for much of its entire run. A huge fan of hot automobiles herself, Kerri drove a badass 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air around LA hitting up shows and soaking in the city at every stop. Swept up in the furor of late 70s and early 80s southern California punk, Kerri’s artwork quickly became a favorite of bands like Circle Jerks, T.S.O.L., the Germs and others which were used for show flyers, posters, and album art. Perhaps her most intrinsic contribution to the punk scene is the “Skank Kid,”(as originally drawn and named by Kerri), the high-stepping hardcore mascot of the Circle Jerks since the early 1980s. You know, this guy:
 

The Skank Kid skanking by Shawn Kerri in 1981.
 
Early on in her career, Kerri worked along with her then-boyfriend, another notable illustrator entrenched in the punk scene, Marc Rude, an artist some consider to be one of the fathers of underground punk art. They would collaborate on a zine called Rude Situation but would part ways. Kerri would go on to score work in tons of publications such as Cracked, adult magazines like Hustler,  Chic, and Gentleman’s Companion—as well as underground comix and zines like Cocaine Comix, Commies from Mars and Flipside. During her active time as an artist, she was wildly prolific, though not as well known as her peers like Rude, Pushead and fellow SoCal legend Raymond Pettibon. Perhaps it was because Kerri didn’t care to engage in copyright disputes. Such a situation presented itself in 1986 when the agent and record label for one of Kerri’s favorite bands, Circle Jerks, took it upon themselves to claim ownership of the Skank Kid image. Instead of engaging in a long and expensive legal fight, she allegedly signed over the rights to her image to Circle Jerks vocalist Keith Morris.

Another compelling piece of Kerri’s story are the rumors concerning her death sometime in the 1990s—which have been disputed by many claiming to know otherwise. According to this article, Kerri died shortly before her 40th birthday after falling down the stairs at her mother’s home in San Diego. And this is where we swing back to Kerri’s former boyfriend Marc Rude for what is likely the correct version of what happened to her. According to an article via Maximum Rock N Roll, Carl Schneider, the filmmaker behind the 2014 documentary on Marc Rude, Mad Marc Rude: Blood, Ink & Needles, paid a visit to Kerri at her mother’s home sometime in 2004 and confirmed the artist was still very much alive but in rather poor health. For what it is worth, Kerri’s Wiki page does not note she has passed, listing only the year of her birth which is 1958. Whatever the case, it would be my hope the talented, passionate punk is loved and staying strong somewhere in sunny SoCal. I know Kerri’s dedicated fan-base would love to know more about her current status, as would I. 

I’ve posted images of Kerri’s work below as well as a few images of her adult-oriented work published using the name Dee Lawdid. Some are NSFW. Skank or die!
 

The front cover of the 1980 album by Eddie and the Subtitles, ‘Fuck You Eddie!” by Shawn Kerri.
 

 

 
More after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Cherrybomb
|
05.08.2018
10:57 am
|
Cool lobby cards from 1960s cult spy flick ‘A Dandy in Aspic’
05.07.2018
11:46 am
Topics:
Tags:

01derekmarlowe_dandycover.jpg
 
By way of an introduction to this selection of lobby cards from the spy thriller A Dandy in Aspic, let me tell you something about the film’s author, Derek Marlowe who wrote a series of bestselling novels in various genres during the sixties and seventies.

You could say Marlowe is one of my favorite writers. I was drawn to his work in my early teens because of the artfulness of his writing, the beauty of his style. I’d had a fill of the MacLean’s and Innes’s and all the other boyhood adventure yarns and was edging towards something heavier—Kafka and Camus and Sartre, Hemingway, and Chandler—when I first picked up a copy of Echoes of Celandine, or The Disappearance as it was later reissued to tie-in with the Donald Sutherland film. This was a story of a hitman, a rather disillusioned hitman, who has one final job to complete which results in some rather tragic events. Unlike the hard-nosed prose of other thriller writers, Marlowe told his tales with a spellbinding lyricism which knocked me for six.

Maybe it was the confluence of age, location, and teenage years, where passions can turn both absurd and romantic, or perhaps a kind of generational thing, as the similarly-aged eminent author Nicholas Royle (who you should also read) tuned in around the same time and still considers Marlowe his “favorite author.”

Marlowe’s style made me aware of the joy and tremendous power to be found in good writing and how a story could be told in oblique and very unexpected ways. A big influence on Marlowe’s writing was, perhaps unsurprisingly, F. Scott Fitzgerald. I suppose it could be argued there are elements of The Great Gatsby filtered throughout Marlowe’s work—even the title of his last novel The Rich Boy from Chicago is a trifle Fitzgeraldean. Marlowe kept a copy of Fitzgerald’s Afternoon of the Author with him throughout his life. His copy had been given to him as a Christmas present in 1960, which he annotated with notes until his death in 1996. To reuse a quote from Arthur Mizener’s introduction to this book, Marlowe, like Fitzgerald, wrote books where the sense of the past is sharp with a “memory for the precise feelings of a time and for the objects to which these feelings cling.” This is seen in nearly all his books but most notably A Single Summer with L.B., Echoes of Celandine, Do You Remember England?, The Rich Boy from Chicago, and his very first novel A Dandy in Aspic.

Born in 1938 into a London east end working-class family, Marlowe first came to note after being sent down from university for writing a satirical piece on exams and lecturers. By a circuitous route, this led Marlowe to write plays for the Royal Court Theater and the Royal Shakespeare Company in the early 1960s, which as he once told me was always quite “off-the-cuff”:

“Someone comes along in a bookshop and says, ‘Would you adapt The Lower Depths for the Royal Shakespeare Company?’ which to me seems extraordinary.”

Though highly proficient at it, Marlowe found writing plays all a bit too easy. Through his work, he became friends with a variety of artists and writers, like actor Corin Redgrave, artist Pauline Boty (who painted his portrait) and most notably the writers Tom Stoppard and Piers Paul Read with whom he attended a writer and filmmaker’s course in Berlin sponsored by the Ford Foundation. [Peter Bergman of the Firesign Theatre was also a part of this course.] On return to London circa 1965, Marlowe, Stoppard, and Read roomed together. While Stoppard focussed solely on writing plays, Marlowe decided to try his hand at writing a novel something which he had started while in Berlin. This was A Dandy in Aspic which Marlowe had originally intended as a play, but he “wrote it as a novel and found [he] suddenly enjoyed it.”

“I wrote it on trains, on the loo, everywhere. I loved actually writing prose, I thought it was smashing. When the book was actually bought, and published by Victor Gollancz and then became a bestseller in America, then made a movie out of it, I thought, ‘My God, writing is easy, isn’t it?’ I learned, of course, that I had the luckiest four-years in my life.”

When Stoppard first heard about Marlowe’s plans to write a spy thriller, he thought him mad, as Ian Fleming, Len Deighton, and John le Carre had more than cornered that market. But when Marlowe told Stoppard what his story was about, the playwright quickly changed his mind. A Dandy in Aspic tells the story of a spy, Eberlin, assigned to find and kill a Russian assassin called Krasnevin. Unfortunately for Eberlin, he is a double-agent working for the Russians and is himself this murderous assassin Krasnevin.

Marlowe once told me how he recalled watching television with Stoppard and Read while idly discussing where their careers might take them.

“I remember once, we were watching Top of the Pops, and Mick Jagger was singing ‘Satisfaction’ and we talked about who was going to get the first million dollars—or whatever. And we all thought Tom would be it—the first person, not a question of top dog, but make big money. [As it turned out] It was myself with Dandy merely by a whisker, because Tom got it with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, and Piers with Alive.”

Marlowe’s novel was an immediate and enormous success on both sides of the Atlantic. The film rights were sold and a movie made starring Laurence Harvey, Mia Farrow, Tom Courtney, and Peter Cook, with a soundtrack by Quincy Jones. Marlowe was then “whipped around America” by his publisher Puttnam. He felt wonderful and was “arrogant, cocky, absolutely appalling.”

“Don’t forget this was ’65-’66, this was the time of The Beatles, of Julie Christie, of Swinging London, of Time magazine going crazy over this small city we’re in now. And because, I was then, what 25? 26? I had a Beatle haircut, and of course, I was the most obnoxious person ever, but adorable.”

A Dandy in Aspic was directed by Anthony Mann, who is best-known for his westerns like The Furies, Winchester ‘73, Bend in the River, and The Naked Spur, his film noir movies like Strangers in the Night, Two O’Clock Courage, and Strange Impersonation, alongside his mainstream hits like The Glenn Miller Story. Mann died of a heart attack during filming and was replaced by Harvey as director, which as Marlowe said, was a bit like the Mona Lisa touching up her portrait when Leonardo was out of the room. Though it was scripted by Marlowe, the film excised much of what was good about the novel and veered between a gritty realism (probably Mann’s direction) and a rather camp pop art sensibility (probably Harvey’s) take for example, Tom Courtney’s performance as Gatiss with his oddly phallic machine gun umbrella—WTF?.

Released in 1968, A Dandy in Aspic did reasonably well and has since become something of a kind of cult flick for its compelling story and strange filmic style. Marlowe went on to write a total of nine novels, which are currently being republished by Silvertail Books, and a load of movie and television scripts. He died from a brain hemorrhage while working in Los Angeles on November 14, 1996.
 
01dandyaspic.jpeg
 
02dandyaspic.jpeg
 
03dandyaspic.jpeg
 
More dandies for ‘A Dandy in Aspic,’ after the jump…
 

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
|
05.07.2018
11:46 am
|
‘Batman’ goes Warhol: Life imitates art, art imitates life & the ‘Girl of the Year’
05.07.2018
11:14 am
Topics:
Tags:


 
Everyone has seen the famous photos of Nico and Andy Warhol dressed as Batman and Robin, and Warhol’s silkscreen of the Batman logo, but evidently the writers for the most “pop art” TV show in history were also very well aware of the Pope of Pop’s movements.

In an episode called “Pop Goes the Joker,” a rich society girl by the name of “Baby Jane Towser” is preyed upon by the Joker who has inadvertently become an acclaimed Warhol-esque pop artist after defacing some art ala Marcel Duchamp. Baby Jane is duped to lure in millionaire patrons to buy the Joker’s art.

Obvious to anyone at the time, the rich girl character was based on one-time fashion model, “It Girl,” Warhol superstar and wealthy young Park Avenue socialite, “Baby” Jane Holzer. Holzer was famously photographed by David Bailey, she made the cover of Vogue and appeared in a handful of Warhol’s early films, such as Couch, Soap Opera and a silent “screen test” where she coyly brushed her teeth for his camera.
 

 
Holzer was known for many things, among them, and in no particular order, her big beautiful mane of hair, her enthusiasm for everything new and exciting, and for being almost a prophet of Andy Warhol’s art, being one of the earliest and most vocal champions of his work. She dated David Bailey and was pursued by the likes of JFK and Warren Beatty. Vogue editor Diana Vreeland called her “the most contemporary girl I know” and Holzer described her look as “Jewish 1964.” She was quite good at causing a stir. It’s not being unfair to say that she was the forerunner of Kim Kardashian.
 

 
Holzer was largely absent from The Factory scene after Edie Sedgewick’s arrival, when Warhol’s entourage became too druggy for her tastes, although she and the artist stayed close friends. The essay “Girl of the Year” from Tom Wolfe’s anthology The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby is about Jane Holzer:

“The show hasn’t even started yet, the Rolling Stones aren’t even on stage… Girls are reeling this way and that way in the aisle and through their huge black decal eyes… they keep staring at - her - Baby Jane - on the aisle… Baby Jane, is a fabulous girl. She comprehends what the Rolling Stones mean. Any columnist in New York could tell them who she is… a celebrity of New York’s new era of Wog Hip… Baby Jane Holzer, Jane Holzer in Vogue, Jane Holzer in Life, Jane Holzer in Andy Warhol’s underground movies, Jane Holzer at the rock and roll, Jane Holzer is - well, how can you put it into words? Jane Holzer is This Years Girl, at least, the New Celebrity, none of your old idea of sexpots, prima donnas, romantic tragediennes, she is the girl who knows… the Stones, East End vitality… ‘Andy calls everything super,’ says Jane. ‘I’m a super star, he’s a super-director, we make super epics - and I mean, it’s a completely new and natural way of acting.You can’t image what really beautiful things can happen!’”

Roxy Music’s Bryan Ferry later referenced Holzer in the the lyrics to “Virginia Plain” (“Baby Jane’s in Acapulco / We are flying down to Rio” and “Can’t you see that Holzer mane?”).

Much more after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Richard Metzger
|
05.07.2018
11:14 am
|
Kenny: Everything about this sucks. The band’s name. The song. Their clothes. Everything.
05.04.2018
12:48 pm
Topics:
Tags:


 
Normally the editorial policy here at Dangerous Minds—such that there is one—is that we tend to post about things we actually like, can get behind and want to enthusiastically share with our readers. It’s difficult to write about stuff you hate and who wants to participate in a “Hey, smell this, it smells like shit” sort of arrangement? Neither reader nor writer? Well, this post will be a departure from all that…

A few days ago, by accident of YouTube’s recommendation algorithm, the video for a song called “Fancy Pants” by a band called Kenny was inflicted upon me. I was dumbfounded by how incredibly shitty it was and decided to lob it out to all the groovesters on Twitter:
 

 
I then proceeded to become oddly fascinated by this awful band, this Kenny. Soon I’d fallen into a K-hole, but thankfully it wasn’t much deeper than a mud puddle (and I happen to really like Mud.)

Songwriters Bill Martin and Phil Coulter, who’d written #1 songs for the Bay City Rollers (“Shang A Lang,” “Saturday Night”), trippy library music, several Eurovision hits (including Sandie Shaw’s “Puppet on a String”) and a World Cup song for Scotland, were responsible for the blight on 70s pop that was Kenny. With the Bay City Rollers themselves as their backing band, Coulter sang the lead vocal on a song called “The Bump” which started selling briskly. The name Kenny apparently came from an Irish singer the songwriting duo had worked with named Tony Kenny as if to imply that the song might be by him. After Mickie Most’s RAK Records had moved around 250,000 records, they started to look around for a band who could “front” for Kenny ala Milli Vanilli on TV’s Top of the Pops.
 

 
A progrock group called Chuff, led by a singer named Ross Pringle, rehearsed in a cold storage unit of a banana warehouse where Pringle worked. The group played at the Windsor Pop Festival and shared the stage in London with heavy groups like Hawkwind, The Edgar Broughton Band and the Troggs. Chuff were approached about becoming Kenny and signed up for the gig after firing poor Ross. A guy called Rick Driscoll replaced him and Kenny, this Kenny, was born.

More after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Richard Metzger
|
05.04.2018
12:48 pm
|
Page 3 of 2265  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  Last ›