FOLLOW US ON: follow us in feedly
GET THE NEWSLETTER
CONTACT US
The Lolita Question: Who was the Real Humbert Humbert?
07.18.2009
04:09 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image


Henry Lanz, Stanford professor, Nabokov’s colleague and chess partner who “married the 14-year-old daughter of a friend.” Was he Humbert Humbert?

Over the chessboard, Lanz confided a dark secret that Nabokov told biographer Field: the memorably dapper professor led a double life. On weekends, he drove to the country to participate in orgies with ?

Posted by Richard Metzger
|
07.18.2009
04:09 pm
|
88 Lines About 44 Women
07.18.2009
01:43 pm
Topics:
Tags:


Marc Campbell of New Wave group The Nails posted this on Facebook:

In the 30 years since 88 LINES ABOUT 44 WOMEN was first recorded there has never been a video version authorized by THE NAILS. Of the dozens of videos on youtube that pay homage to the song, this is the only version created by a member of the band, me. So, here’s the world premier of 88 LINES the video. Hope you enjoy it. I had fun making it.

(NSFW-ish)

Update: This is the infamous video of 88 LINES ABOUT 44 WOMEN that was banned by youtube.

Posted by Tara McGinley
|
07.18.2009
01:43 pm
|
THE ZOMBIES FIND BUNNY LAKE (AMUSING)
07.18.2009
01:09 pm
Topics:
Tags:


After The Yardbirds in Blow-Up, my 2nd favorite band cameo has got to be from The Zombies in Skidoo-auteur Otto Preminger’s Bunny Lake Is Missing.  They’re seen only briefly (and on a pub TV at that), but their presence does wonders to anchor the film in a place and time.  And in a clear reaching out to, you know, “the kids,” they even cut a promo for Bunny—one that manages to mock, it seems, the very serious film they’re selling!

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
|
07.18.2009
01:09 pm
|
The collapse of Soviet communism never relegated Marx’s ideas to the dustbin of history
07.18.2009
11:59 am
Topics:
Tags:

image

 

The New Republic’s always brilliant John B. Judis wrote an excellent short essay in last month’s Foreign Policy that everyone should read. I could not agree more with the sentiments here:

In 1995, a magazine published by a conservative Washington think tank brought together a group of writers and scholars to debate a question that seemed to have a foregone conclusion: ?

Posted by Richard Metzger
|
07.18.2009
11:59 am
|
John Lennon on Monday Night Football with Howard Cosell (1974)
07.18.2009
11:06 am
Topics:
Tags:


I like how he’s confused by the rules of American Football. I doesn’t make any sense to me, either, and I’m American… (HT Mikki Halpin)

Posted by Richard Metzger
|
07.18.2009
11:06 am
|
Psychoville: Be Afraid, Be Very Afraid
07.17.2009
05:59 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image

 

I am really enjoying Psychoville the new seven part BBC2 comedy series from the League of Gentlemen’s Steve Pemberton and Reece Shearsmith. I am an absolute League of Gentlemen fanatic (as anyone who knows me can tell you) and Psychoville’s seven episode run has me in TV heaven.

Attempting to make a comedic series as complex and multi-layered as, say, “24” or “Lost” and with distinctly Hitchcockian elements in abundance (ep #4 is one continuous shot!), Pemberton and Shearsmith’s script ties together several disparate characters: Maureen and David Sowerbutts, a mother-son serial killer duo; Mr. Jelly, a bitter one-armed alcoholic party clown for hire; Oscar Lomax, a blind millionaire who collects Beanie Babies; Joy Aston (played by Dawn French), a nurse who believe a doll is her real son and a dwarf actor with telekinesis trying to hide his “midget porn” past.

All six are connected by a mysterious letter they all receive that simply reads: “I know what you did.”

Welcome to Psychoville by co-creator Reece Shearsmith
Psychoville: the new home of horror comedy
Video interview with Steve Pemberton and Reece Shearsmith

Posted by Richard Metzger
|
07.17.2009
05:59 pm
|
Young Madonna performing at Danceteria, 1982
07.17.2009
05:14 pm
Topics:
Tags:


 
I accidentally stumbled across this clip of Madonna making a very early appearance at the fabled Danceteria nightclub in New York. It’s a wonder more people haven’t looked at this clip—just 4k as I write this. Must be one of the earliest Madonna performances out there (according to Wikipedia it was her very first “solo” appearance, but I’m not sure I believe that).

Madonna used to work at Danceteria, in the coat check. This is from a weekly talent show/cabaret night there that was called “No Entiendes,” hosted by Howie Montaug and DJ Anita Sarko.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
|
07.17.2009
05:14 pm
|
Bryan Talbot: Secret Chief of Comics
07.17.2009
02:48 pm
Topics:
Tags:

 

Bryan Talbot is the man who invented modern comics. But you’d never know, because he’s one of the most unsung artists in the field.

Talbot’s Luther Arkwright comic started off in the mid-seventies as a pastiche of Michael Moorcock’s Jerry Cornelius character, but by the time Talbot had completed the series in the eighties, he’d ended up laying down the template from which Alan Moore, Grant Morrison, Neil Gaiman, Garth Ennis and the entire Vertigo line of comics sprang from. Talbot borrowed not only from Moorcock and the British New Wave (of science fiction) but also film techniques like Nic Roeg’s use of cross-cutting, ending up with a particularly potent mix of subject matter, characterization and technique that would inspire practically the entire next twenty years of “mature readers” comics.

(Warren Ellis on Luther Arkwright: “[It’s] probably the single most influential graphic novel to have come out of Britain to date… probably Anglophone comics’ single most important experimental work.”)

Arkwright is an albino assassin who drops out in the sixties, gets stoned, activates his psychic powers, ends up in a parallel England where Oliver Cromwell’s rule never ended, attains enlightenment in a tantric sex ritual, and is charged with leading a revolution against the brutal Puritan regime. Somehow it’s a lot more complicated and cosmic than that?

Posted by Jason Louv
|
07.17.2009
02:48 pm
|
SNAPE DOES BECKETT
07.17.2009
01:59 pm
Topics:
Tags:

 
While I was never a fan of Anthony Minghella, or his limp entry in the Ripley sweepstakes (for some truly great Ripley action see this, or definitely this, then, if you’re curious about Patricia Highsmith, maybe read this), I’m a huge fan of both Beckett, and the always entertaining Alan Rickman (not that Beckett, too, can’t entertain).  The 4-disc Beckett On Film ranges, in my mind, all over the place in quality, but I think the set’s standout is definitely the Minghella-helmed version of Play, starring the melancholy Snape himself.  Let’s see…Rickman’s in an urn between the also-urned Kristen Scott Thomas and Juliet Stevenson, and, well…just push “play!”  (You’ll need to push it twice, though: Play II follows below.)

Play II

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
|
07.17.2009
01:59 pm
|
Karl-Heinz Stockhausen is not amused
07.17.2009
11:24 am
Topics:
Tags:
Posted by Richard Metzger
|
07.17.2009
11:24 am
|
Page 2230 of 2233 ‹ First  < 2228 2229 2230 2231 2232 >  Last ›