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Black & Blue: The infamous riot at a Black Sabbath & Blue Öyster Cult gig in Milwaukee, 1980
01.10.2018
09:38 am
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A poster for the concert film ‘Black & Blue’ (note producer!) which captured performances from both Black Sabbath and Blue Öyster Cult at the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Hempstead, New York on October 17th, 1980.
 

“We wanted to give a lot for you, but not our blood. If you don’t want to enjoy it, then tough shit!”

—A pissed-off Ronnie James Dio’s parting words to their Black Sabbath’s Milwaukee fans before a massive riot broke out at the MECCA on October 9th, 1980.


It should have been a gig for the ages—a co-headling show between two musical juggernauts, Black Sabbath and Blue Öyster Cult. BÖC and Sabbath had been touring pretty steadily together since July (along with a bunch of other bands like Molly Hatchet, Journey, and Cheap Trick) and by all accounts, the dream bill was something to behold. With Ronnie James Dio at the helm, Sabbath had just released Heaven and Hell to much acclaim from their fans and music critics. BÖC also had a new record to promote, their seventh, Cultösaurus Erectus. It is estimated that 1.5 million people were lucky enough to witness one of the many shows the two bands did together—though one stop on the tour at Milwaukee’s MECCA (the Milwaukee Exposition Convention Center Arena) on October 9th, 1980 didn’t go exactly as planned…

Accounts of how the gig devolved into a riot, vary. Some say Blue Öyster Cult played too long leading fans to get restless for Black Sabbath. Other reports say the hour wait between the two sets got under the audience’s skin making them edgy. Whatever it was or wasn’t, the 9,000 plus, near-capacity crowd in attendance at the MECCA was fired up when Black Sabbath took the stage a few ticks before 9:30. The band kicked off their set with “War Pigs” followed by “Neon Knights.” Then, as the lights were purposefully dimmed as Dio introduced their third song, “N.I.B.”, someone hummed a bottle at the stage which struck Sabbath bassist Geezer Butler in the head, knocking him unconscious. Here are Butler’s recollections of the fateful night:

“It’s all a big misunderstanding, really, The lights were down, first of all, so unless the fellow was some sort of incredible quarterback, I don’t know how he could have hit me on purpose. But I was knocked out, and the band was busy getting me off the stage and to a hospital. When the lights came back up, there was no band on stage. And of course, the crowd freaked out. Someone should have gone out and explained—the promoter or someone. I mean, the band was worrying about getting me to the hospital, you know? So the crowd freaked out because there was suddenly no band on stage, and things got worse from there.”

 

. A shot of Buck Dharma of BÖC on stage at the MECCA.
 
Things had yet to get completely out of hand but did shortly after Dio came out and told the rowdy crowd to suck it (Dio’s actual quote appears at the top of this post). Then, Black Sabbath’s tour manager, Andrew Truman took the still darkened stage (as noted in Billboard magazine, October 25th, 1980) as did Sabbath’s production manager, Huw Price. Both Price and Truman took turns admonishing the crowd, telling them the show would not go on saying the band wanted to play Milwaukee but “didn’t appreciate being hit by unidentified flying objects.” Price was allegedly the one who got the job to tell the crowd “just cool out,” as Sabbath wouldn’t be “coming back on stage as the bass player (Butler) is too hurt.” It was now around 11:15—nearly two hours after Sabbath’s unplanned two-song set and in response to Price’s speech, they started shouting in unison “We want Sabbath! We want Sabbath!” The lights went on, and the crowd turned its rage towards the MECCA itself.

Chairs were thrown, smashed and hurled into a growing pile in the center of the floor. Fans ripped out the handrails in the balcony, and one guy tried to light a pile of wooden chairs on fire because of course, he had his handy BIC lighter with him. Pay phones (remember them?) were ripped from the walls, and random bare-knuckle brawls broke out in the crowd who were now tossing chairs at the stage and smashing windows. Once large numbers of Milwaukee’s finest moved in, all decked out in riot gear, they started indiscriminately beating the shit out of people with their billy clubs, something they would repeat a few months later on the face of Plasmatics vocalist Wendy O. Williams. The riot continued outside the MECCA where angry fans took their aggression out on police cars, private property and even the cops themselves. 160 people ended up spending the night in jail for various crimes including a large number of drug-related arrests. The next day, Milwaukee Police Chief Harold Breier announced there would be no further rock concerts at the MECCA as well as no more beer served at the concessions stands. What a buzz-kill. Thankfully, the restrictions didn’t last and in 1981 rock and roll (and BEER!) returned to the MECCA as did AC/DC and Van Halen.

I’ve posted audio of the show below where Butler gets his block rocked by a bottle as well as some visual artifacts of the riot and its aftermath.
 

Fans exiting a broken down door at the MECCA (Milwaukee Exposition Convention Center Arena) during riot that followed a Black Sabbath and Blue Öyster Cult’s show on October 9th, 1980. All photos from the show and the aftermath are via the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
 

 

 

He seems nice.
 
Much more after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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01.10.2018
09:38 am
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Go to bed with Motörhead, Nick Cave (as Batman), The Cramps & more with these badass duvet covers
01.09.2018
11:14 am
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A lovely Motörhead duvet featuring three images of Lemmy Kilmister’s unforgettable mug. 86 bucks. Get it here.
 
If you follow my posts here on Dangerous Minds, then you know at times my thoughts are often occupied with all things heavy and metal. Any day I get to jaw about any of my personal headbanging heroes is a good fucking day not only for me but for all you DM readers still carrying a torch for the genre. For today’s post, I feel like I’ve found the “adult”(?) equivalent of a tricked-out teenage bedroom with rock posters wiping out any trace of wallpaper—duvet covers with prints of your favorite bands. Because of course, you want to go to bed with Motörhead, don’t you?

The boss duvets below feature artwork and images from a plethora of punks and a multitude of metalheads such as the Plasmatics, The Clash, The Cramps, Van Halen, King Diamond, Alice Cooper, Iron Maiden and others too numerous to call out by name. I do feel compelled to note a duvet cover featuring an image of Nick Cave looking like a neon-colored Batman exists, and it is as excellent as it sounds. Most of the duvets can be had for less than 100 bucks (depending on the size) over on REDBUBBLE, and from the reviews, they all appear to be well worth the investment. Plus, I’m pretty sure a possible perk of owning one of these unique duvet covers just might lead to you getting lucky. (Or maybe not...) In most cases, the prints can be put on other items such as pillows and such because who really wants to grow up. Not me, that’s for sure.
 

Alice Cooper’s famous eyes on a duvet cover.
 

MANOWAR! The duvet cover.
 

Black Flag logo duvet.
 
More after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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01.09.2018
11:14 am
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Blue Thunder: Nova Scotia’s Crime Fighting Police Rock & Roll Band
01.09.2018
11:00 am
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There have been plenty of songs written about cops, but what about those written by cops?

Meet Blue Thunder, the crime fighting rock and roll band from Halifax, Nova Scotia. Formed in September 1991, Blue Thunder was comprised of four acting municipal police officers and one citizen volunteer from the Halifax Regional Police Department. Yes, they were real cops.

Over several years, the five-piece would play to over one hundred schools and local events in the Atlantic Canada region. As you may have guessed it, their mission was to warn the youth of the dangers of drugs and alcohol - with a rock ‘n’ roll twist! And believe me, if you saw five cops on stage singing about shooting up, you’d put the fucking needle down, too.

In June of 1995, Blue Thunder performed at the 21st G7 Summit in Nova Scotia. Known as the G20 Summit today, the conference brought together the leaders of the world’s richest industrialized countries. Being at the right place at the very right time, Blue Thunder performed at the expo finale to a crowd of 10,000 people. Sometime around then, the band gigged its way to the post-communist Republic of Slovakia for a concert that was the focus of a one hour special on the Associated Television Network.
 

 
I reached out to the Halifax Regional Police Department for more info and was connected with (retired) Constable Steve Saunders from Blue Thunder who wrote me with the following:

The band started in the early 1990s when drummer Darryl Lysens, a crime prevention member, became aware of a number of former musicians serving in the department and wanted to put something together for a multicultural dinner/concert.

Darryl had played in the 60s with a number of musicians prior to joining the police. Cedric Upshaw soon became the lead guitar and vocalist having played in bands in the 60s and 70s heavily influenced by the blues (great voice and guitar).

Ron Morgan, Dogmaster from Dartmouth Police, played guitar having a more jazz background with bass starting with a close friend of Daryl’s, Sandy Bryson (civilian) soon replaced by Ernie Retti, a staff member working out of the police garage and well known in the music circuit.

I have a long music and sporting background having played in bands for years and even joining a high school pit band for six years for their annual musical (also coaching the high school football team).

The band really took off for the first five years playing in middle schools, public concerts, a giant G7 (now G20) concert, the Nova Scotia Tattoo and travelling to the Republic Of Slovakia to introduce western policing to police and citizens.

After the jump, watch the Blue Thunder perform in all their law-enforcing glory…

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Posted by Bennett Kogon
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01.09.2018
11:00 am
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Rob Halford of Judas Priest challenges his hero Freddie Mercury to a motorbike race, 1980
01.09.2018
10:17 am
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Rob Halford and Freddie Mercury.
 

“I’ve always found it ironic that a certain aspect of gay culture has also chosen to dress this way. I’m not into that kind of thing though. I guess it’s whatever floats your boat y’know? I’m what you’d call a very vanilla kind of gay guy.”


—Judas Priest vocalist Rob Halford on his fashion choices.

Judas Priest frontman Rob Halford is known for many things. Aside from being one of the greatest metal vocalists of all time, Halford’s cultivated image of head-to-toe leather and spikes is synonymous with heavy metal itself. In fact, when the band performed on Top of the Pops on January 25th, 1979, Halford’s badass bondage-style getup spread like wildfire across the world and would soon become the go-to look for headbangers. Another thing Halford is widely known for is his love of motorcycles and if you’ve seen Priest live, then perhaps you’ve been lucky enough to see Halford ride out on stage on one. Which brings me to another mythical story involving Halford and a man he refers to as his “ultimate hero,” Queen vocalist Freddie Mercury.
 

Rob Halford circa 1979/1980.
 
The year was 1980 and Queen had just released their eighth record The Game in June. Audiences went completely bananas for the album and showed a particular affinity for two songs you likely know all the words to, “Another One Bites the Dust,” and “Crazy Little Thing Called Love.” The band would later earn a reputation for releasing unique videos for their songs, and the video for “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” is no exception. In the video, Mercury is dressed up like an outlaw biker in a stage production of the 1961 film West Side Story complete with an authentic but stationary motorcycle which Mercury straddles along with his blonde video girlfriend. And Rob Halford was having none of it.

According to Halford, after he saw the video he went on BBC Radio 1 and challenged Mercury to a real “motorbike race.” I know I’m not going out on a limb saying if the event had actually transpired, it would have been one of the greatest moments in TV history. Sadly, Mercury never responded to Rob’s challenge. Here’s more from the Metal God who walks among us on that:

“I never heard back from him. Freddie is my ultimate hero. The closest I ever got to Freddie was in a gay bar in Athens on the way to Mykonos with some friends from London. We kind of glared at each other across the bar, in a kind of smiling, winking way. When we got to Mykonos, I was determined to track him down, but I couldn’t because he’d rented this huge yacht. It was festooned in pink balloons and it just kept sailing around the island.”

More after the jump…

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Posted by Cherrybomb
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01.09.2018
10:17 am
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Lurch from ‘The Addams Family’ sings ‘Do the Lurch’
01.09.2018
09:53 am
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01lurch.jpg
 
Though it lasted for only two seasons and a total of 64 episodes between 1964 and 1966, The Addams Family has become such a staple of popular culture it’s reckoned that every day somewhere in the world an episode of the show is still being watched by fans old and new. Adapted from Charles Addams’ original comic strip in The New Yorker, The Addams Family shared the strange adventures of a kooky and macabre family headed-up by Gomez (John Astin) and Morticia Adams (Carolyn Jones), their daughter Wednesday (Lisa Loring), son Pugsley (Ken Weatherwax), Uncle Fester (Jackie Coogan), Grandma (Blossom Rock), and, last but not least, the family butler Lurch (Ted Cassidy).

The Addams Family TV series was produced by Nat Perrin, a gag writer-cum-scriptwriter who had worked with the Marx Brothers. This might explain why Gomez had a touch of Groucho Marx about him. But it’s not Gomez I want to talk about. I want to share with you a small nugget of video Heaven featuring Ted Cassidy as Lurch singing (if that’s the right word) about a new dance craze he wants everyone to do called “The Lurch.”

Cassidy was a six-foot nine-inches tall actor whose stature meant he was usually cast as extraterrestrials, villains, or deeply menacing tough guys. You may recall the scene in Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid when Cassidy as a knife-wielding bad guy squared up to Paul Newman only to be righteously kicked in balls. But Cassidy was more than just a physical presence in feet and inches, his vocal skills led to him being regularly hired to voice numerous cartoon and TV series—including the narration and voice for TV’s The Incredible Hulk. He was adept at playing the organ and also co-wrote the movie The Harrad Experiment about a sexually liberated student campus directed by Ted Post. Though obviously more than capable of doing other things, Cassidy will always be best remembered for his performance as the cadaverous, monosyllabic, giant of a servant, Lurch.
 
02lurchmask.jpg
A life mask of Ted Cassidy as Lurch made during the making of ‘The Addams Family.’
 
In October 1965, at the height of The Addams Family popularity on TV, Cassidy cashed-in on his fame as Lurch with a one-off single called (unsurprisingly) “The Lurch.” Intended to hit the Halloween market this novelty record written by Gary Paxton, who had previously produced “Alley-Oop” for the Hollywood Argyles in 1960 and “Monster Mash” for Bobby “Boris” Pickett in 1962.

Hear it, after the jump…

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Posted by Paul Gallagher
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01.09.2018
09:53 am
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Filthy lucre: A Sex Pistols 7” has sold for about $15,000 USD
01.08.2018
11:57 am
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The Guardian once listed an unreleased Sex Pistols single as one of the rarest records in Britain. Discogs.com‘s online marketplace has verified the sale, in November, of one of those unreleased singles for $14,690 USD. This is far from the first time a copy of that record has fetched an exorbitant sum.

March of 1977 was an eventful month for the Sex Pistols. Founding bassist Glen Matlock had just quit at the end of February (reports that he’d been fired for being a Beatles fan were pretty hilarious, but were also total bullshit), and he was quickly “replaced” with non-bassist Sid Vicious. The band were signed to Herb Alpert’s A&M records after being dismissed from their previous contract with EMI “in view of the adverse publicity generated.” Recording of their first A&M single, “God Save the Queen,” had already begun while Vicious was still just beginning to learn how to play bass, so he wasn’t on the sessions, but it hardly mattered, as A&M would swiftly follow EMI in dropping the Sex Pistols, this time without even releasing a single song (the band got to keep all the money both times, a happenstance chronicled in their song “EMI” and The Great Rock ‘N’ Roll Swindle). 25,000 copies of the hastily recorded and manufactured 7” had been pressed, and almost all were destroyed.

Per John Scanlan, writing in Sex Pistols: Poison in the Machine:

During the first week of March, as Vicious busied himself learning how to play bass guitar and play the Pistols set, the rest of the band continued recording. The main aim of these sessions was to nail ‘God Save the Queen,’ which was due to be rush-released as their first A&M single, but other songs—‘Did You No Wrong’ and ‘No Feelings’—were also recorded, with Steve Jones playing both bass and guitar. The following week, the Pistols signed with A&M at the offices of their music publishing arm, Rondor Music, so as not to send shockwaves through the regular A&M Records staff, who were located elsewhere in London…

In an attempt to generate early publicity for their forthcoming single ‘God Save the Queen,’ the signing was restaged the following day outside Buckingham Palace. The following week’s sounds, dated 19 March, carried a cover story on the signing in which [UK A&M chief] Derek Green stated his conviction that the Pistols would ‘effect some major changes in rock music,’ which A&M wexcited to be involved with. Unfortunately for all involved, but the time the magazine had hit the streets, the Pistols had once again been sacked by their record label.

The day after the restaged signing, Rotten, Vicious, and their friend Jah Wobble had appeared drunk and disorderly at The Speakeasy, the London club where music industry figures and musicians went to relax. Wobble and Vicious had confronted the Old Grey Whistle Test presenter Bob Harris and one of his studio crew, George Nicholson, about the absence of the Sex Pistols on their show. According to subsequent reports, Rotten stayed out of the ensuing violence, but Vicious and Wobble landed Harris and Nicholson in hospital, where they had to be treated for minor cuts and bruises. As soon as word of this latest spectacle reached Derek Green at A&M he quickly decided he was wrong to think that he could manage the chaos that seemed to follow the Pistols everywhere, and dropped the band immediately. The company then destroyed as many copies of ‘God Save the Queen’ as it could find (only a few hundred copies had been circulated prior to its official release).

 
Continues after the jump…

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Posted by Ron Kretsch
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01.08.2018
11:57 am
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KISS prove, yet again, that they are the biggest assholes in rock
01.08.2018
09:24 am
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A 2012 South American television interview with KISS has recently surfaced in which the band demands an embarrassed journalist to remove his Iron Maiden t-shirt before interviewing them.

We’ve come to expect such extreme assholism from Gene, but Paul actually starts this one off by refusing to answer the first question, but instead chastising the interviewer, “KISS is spelled K-I-S-S, (points at interviewer’s Iron Maiden shirt) this does not spell KISS, Gustavo. You made a big mistake.”

The interviewer defends his sartorial choice, saying “I picked this shirt to interview you guys… it’s not cool to wear a KISS shirt to a KISS interview.”

The band disagrees, with Gene chiming in “I don’t want him wearing an Iron Maiden t-shirt,” and then demands that the interviewer wear the shirt inside-out.

The members of KISS seem to be so far up their own asses with their branding, that they treat the interviewer as if he had worn a Burger King t-shirt to an interview with the CEO of McDonald’s. The fake Peter Criss, who believes bands are like sports teams, later adds: “If you went to a Raider’s game, you wouldn’t wear the other team’s uniform.”

The members of KISS apparently have missed the difference between fandom and corporate sponsorship. One could argue that the band is playing around here, but they come off as quite serious and the interviewer is obviously embarrassed about the situation, though he tried to remain professional and play it off. They are literally telling other people what they can or cannot wear JUST TO SPEAK TO THEM.

Paul condescendingly chides the interviewer: “Gustavo is very smaaart. ‘How I get a KISS t-shirt for free?’ You show up with the wrong t-shirt.” 

Gene says “He don’t understand,” with the interviewer replying “I do, I do,” to which Gene retorts insultingly, “you’re twelve, you’re new.”

Paul tells the journalist that “you’re in our house” and that he “doesn’t show respect.”

“We also have a t-shirt that says ‘I don’t understand,’ you can wear that,” adds Gene.

Gene then makes the interviewer take his shirt off and turn it inside out before the fake Peter Criss comes along with a XXXL KISS shirt that they force Guatavo to wear.

Aside from Sharon’s dancing circus bear act, Ozzy, no other band holds a candle to the grandiose legacy-pissing done by KISS.
 
Watch it, after the jump…

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Posted by Christopher Bickel
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01.08.2018
09:24 am
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Peter Gabriel’s German albums
01.05.2018
10:46 am
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After his years in Genesis, Peter Gabriel released four solo albums, all of them confusingly given the title “Peter Gabriel,” that are widely recognized as post-prog/post-punk masterpieces of some stripe.

What many of his fans don’t know is that Gabriel made the decision to release German-language versions of the last two albums in that series, the ones often called “Melt” and “Security,” respectively. For Melt, Gabriel “merely” sang the translated German lyrics over the original tracks, but for the German version of Security it seems that he actually re-recorded large chunks of the album as well.

Such multilingualism among top recording acts is not unknown, of course. The Beatles, after all, released “Sie Liebt Dich,” a German version of “She Loves You,” and Petula Clark and Sandie Shaw had all kinds of hits on the continent. David Bowie released “Helden,” a German version of “Heroes.” David Lee Roth put out Sonrisa Salvaje, a version of Eat ‘Em and Smile with Spanish vocal tracks. But it’s obviously not all that common.

The translations for the two Gabriel albums were were supplied by a certain Horst Königstein, a German writer and director for television and the theater. The record is largely silent on Gabriel’s motivations for undertaking this extra work—if you ask me, the most likely answer is perhaps “creative restlessness.” In Experiencing Peter Gabriel: A Listener’s Companion, Durrell Bowman mentions that in concerts around 1980, Gabriel was observed to sing a French version of a song from the 1950s (if not earlier) called “Me and My Teddy Bear.”

In his book Without Frontiers: The Life and Music of Peter Gabriel, Daryl Easlea provides the following bit of commentary:
 

Following the success of the German version of Melt that Gabriel made in 1980, he released a sister version of Security, titled as the previous release, Ein Deutsches Album. However, while the previous album had been merely Gabriel overdubbing his vocals into German, here he went the whole hog and re-recorded and remixed huge swathes of the album, including getting Peter Hammill back in to sing backing vocals in German. It was a great achievement to remix and re-record some of the work, with different effects and vocal lines. It demonstrated that this had been Gabriel’s masterwork to date in that he had exercised a level of control over the recording that he hadn’t been able to before, the building-up-from-the-ground approach suited him perfectly and would be the method he would use on all further recordings.

 
I’m sure Mr Easlea is correct that Security left as a residue increased feelings of confidence in Gabriel. However, I recently spent a solid chunk of time listening to the English and German versions of both Melt and Security, and one of the clearest takeaways from those hours is that Melt is the superior album. Security has its strengths, to be sure, but overall, it’s simply a more conventional piece of work—but of course it was just that sort of convention and relatable sentiment, not, ah, “creative restlessness,” that years later allowed a song like “In Your Eyes” to become such a smash. Gabriel may have been the creative spawn of Gargravarr most of the time, but his genius was such that, especially in the 1980s, he could really wallop the masses with a “Big Time” or whatever.
 

ein deutsches album
 
Linguistically speaking, there isn’t all that much to report in terms of alterations or interesting turns of phrase in Herr Königstein’s exemplary renderings. Most of the songs have fairly conventional verses and choruses, so all one has to do is translate them, which Königstein did. It’s only in the more adventurous material that you can spot Königstein being forced to scramble a bit and deviate from the original meaning a little.

For instance, there’s a significant change in one of the lines of “Intruder,” which on the foreign release can claim the marvelous German word “Eindringling.” Most of the lines are straightforwardly translated, but an exception can be spotted in the lyric “A sense of isolation, a sense of isolation inspires me.” Königstein casts the line as “Wir sind unter uns, ich lass mich erregen,” which is quite different. “Wir sind unter uns” means something like “we are among us” but the real meaning would be, “we’re alone, it’s just us.” “Ich lass mich erregen” means “I let myself become excited.”

The German version of this track is practically a love song!

Listen to Gabriel doing his best Deutsch-sprechen-sprachen after the jump…...
 

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Posted by Martin Schneider
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01.05.2018
10:46 am
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Effort underway to bring ‘Turning Japanese’ one-hit-wonders, The Vapors, back to the USA
01.05.2018
10:06 am
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Known as “one-hit-wonders” for their MTV mega-hit “Turning Japanese,” which peaked at 36 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1980, The Vapors are perhaps one of the most criminally underrated bands of the “new wave era.”

Personally, I love this band so much that the record store I opened right out of college was named “New Clear Days,” after the first Vapors album. That was the one record my business partner and I could agree on when it came to in-store play. Both the New Clear Days album and its excellent follow-up, Magnets are highly original and insanely catchy, hook-laden, power pop masterworks.

“Turning Japanese,” from New Clear Days, believed by many to be an anthem to masturbation (a claim denied by songwriter/vocalist David Fenton), has persisted as one of the iconic new wave singles of the early ‘80s. 

The Vapors recently reunited in England after a 35-year-hiatus for a series of shows.

A US-based Vapors fan, Evan Blonder from Long Island, recently launched a crowd-funding campaign via GoFundMe to bring the band over to the United States to play three shows in New York City. The band has not played in the States since 1980. Blonder’s campaign hopes to raise $23,000 to cover the cost of performer’s visas, flights, and accommodations to bring the band and their crew over. As of this writing, the campaign is about a third of the way to its goal. 

The campaign offers a number of perks for donors, including meet and greet opportunities—though it does not appear that any of the perks are a simple concert ticket.

After the jump, a fantastic live recording of the last time The Vapors were in New York, back in 1980. If you are a fan, you will not want to miss this…

READ ON
Posted by Christopher Bickel
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01.05.2018
10:06 am
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Trip out with Salvador Dalí and Amanda Lear at a 1968 art opening
01.05.2018
09:58 am
Topics:
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Olivier Mosset, ‘Untitled,’ 1968 (via Contemporary Art Daily)

Fun and Games for Everyone is the second of three films the French director Serge Bard made before changing his name to Abdullah Siradj and abandoning le cinéma. This one immortalizes a 1968 opening at the Rive Droite gallery, dedicated to Olivier Mosset’s series of identical white canvases with black circles in the center.

The film was shot in ultra-high-contrast black and white, an effect achieved by cinematographer Henri Alekan:

Alekan asked LTC film labs to flash the negative before processing it, giving the film a semi-negative look.

Bard was a member of the “Zanzibar group” of filmmakers, which also included Mosset, Jackie Raynal, and Philippe Garrel, later the director of a number of really miserable movies starring Nico. On the soundtrack of Fun and Games is French jazzer Barney Wilen, whose big move in ‘68 was a “free rock” album dedicated to Timothy Leary.

The trailer is below, and the full movie is available for rent on Vimeo. Patient and attentive viewers will spot Salvador Dalí, Amanda Lear, and Barbet Schroeder; there is, for instance, a glimpse of Dalí at 36:45. Caveat spectator: the full movie is a non-narrative deal. There is much gorgeous footage of slightly dazed French people, and the movie opens with a long period of silence; such dialogue as occurs is almost entirely in French, and there are no subtitles.
 

Posted by Oliver Hall
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01.05.2018
09:58 am
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