FOLLOW US ON: follow us in feedly
GET THE NEWSLETTER
CONTACT US
Nick Cave’s life & work come alive in a stunning new 328-page graphic novel ‘Nick Cave: Mercy on Me’
10.17.2017
07:48 am
Topics:
Tags:


An illustration by Reinhard Kleist from his new graphic novel, ‘Nick Cave: Mercy on Me.’
 

“Floods, fire, and frogs leapt out of my throat,” he explained. “Though I had no notion of that then, God was talking not just to me but through me, and His breath stank. I was a conduit for a God that spoke in a language written in bile and puke. And for a while, that suited me fine.”

—Nick Cave ruminates on God during a broadcast by BBC Radio 3 Religious Services in 1996. Read/listen to it here.

From his origins growing up in Australia glued to The Johnny Cash Show, to his days with The Birthday Party and later The Bad Seeds—author and illustrator Reinhard Kleist has left no stone unturned when it comes to his exploration of Nick Cave’s life in his new graphic novel, Nick Cave: Mercy on Me.

Kleist uses his dark and striking illustrations to help bring out emotions such as dread, desperation, persistence, and revelation as they witness Cave’s life and long career, from his huge-hair and heroin days with The Birthday Party to his more polished yet still antagonistic times with The Bad Seeds. The book even incorporates things from 2014’s documentary, 20,000 Days On Earth. Like life in general, the book is often a grim ride—especially when it concerns Cave’s early days in and out of addiction clinics and his time in Berlin—which, according to Cave, was a moment in his life where he felt “quite lost.” There he met Christoph Dreher, founder of the post-rock band Die Haut whom Cave credits with “basically keeping him alive” for a few years (you can see a blistering performance by Cave with Die Haut back in 1992, which is depicted in Kleist’s book, here). If you’re wondering how the legendarily cantankerous Mr. Cave feels about Kleist’s book, here’s more on that directly from the man himself:

“Reinhard Kleist, master graphic novelist, and myth-maker has - yet again - blown apart the conventions of the graphic novel by concocting a terrifying conflation of Cave songs, biographical half-truths and complete fabulations and creating a complex, chilling and completely bizarre journey into Cave World. Closer to the truth than any biography, that’s for sure! But for the record, I never killed Elisa Day.”

Stop me if I’m wrong, but I do believe that Cave just gave Kleist two goth-thumbs up for his efforts. I agree with Cave’s assessment of Kleist’s work, and if you are at all of a fan of Nick Cave, I recommend picking this book up right away. An English version of the graphic novel (which was initially published in German), can be found here. In case there is still any doubt that you need this book, I’ve posted a large collection of Kleist’s starkly beautiful illustrations from Nick Cave: Mercy on Me, below.
 

An illustration from ‘Nick Cave: Mercy on Me,’ Reinhard Kleist.
 

 

 
More after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Cherrybomb
|
10.17.2017
07:48 am
|
Breathtaking comix panels inspired by Nick Cave’s first novel
10.06.2017
04:10 pm
Topics:
Tags:


But Now by God, it ROARS!
 
You might remember the name Tom Neely for his whimsical tribute to punk rock’s most famous gay couple, Glenn Danzig and Henry Rollins. Neely’s Glenn and Henry Forever, which came out in 2010, received a positive notice from Rollins (“if I were to find that anything less than hilarious, then I am in the wrong business”) but from Danzig, not so much (“I didn’t think it was very funny ... it was a very crappy, opportunistic book”).

In Pasadena during all of September, there was an intriguing exhibition that documented, quite unusually, the failure of an artistic project. Birds of Death presented the art that Neely had generated for a comix adaptation of Nick Cave’s first novel And the Ass Saw the Angel. Unfortunately, after being approached to undertake the work (and after Neely had spent considerable time and effort creating images for the graphic novel), he discovered that the rights to Cave’s novel had not been “properly secured,” which meant that Neely would not be able to produce an authorized adaptation of And the Ass Saw the Angel after all.

Bummer! As the notes to the show explain, the bleak and haunting series of images “allows an abstract interpretation” of not just Cave’s book but also “Neely’s disappointment in the circumstances surrounding the project.”

Published in 1989—right on the heels of Tender PreyAnd the Ass Saw the Angel was (and is) as Cave-ian as they come, as you can see yourself from the images. The book covers bleak and doomy life of Euchrid Eucrow, the self-styled “Monarch of Doghead” in Australia’s (fictional, I think) Ukulore Valley. The book sounds a bit overcooked—one review called it a “messianic, overheated tirade” (the review was not actually negative) while another referenced the “clotted, gutsy prose which ranges from poetic to rabid”—and Cave actually cut a lot of the purple prose for a 20th-anniversary edition that came out in 2009.

According to the gallery website, some of the images are still available for purchase.
 

One Full Quarter
 
Much more after the jump….......
 

READ ON
Posted by Martin Schneider
|
10.06.2017
04:10 pm
|
Dark Desires: The erotic etchings of Frans de Geetere (NSFW)
10.05.2017
09:48 am
Topics:
Tags:

00frans.jpg
‘Les Aphrodites.’
 
We’re in Paris of the 1920s: a world of cheap hotels, low-rent dives, darkened rooms, the hiss of gas lamps, the smell of cigarettes and sex, eau de cologne, grubby bedsheets, prostitutes, lovers, women, men, alcohol, opium, and unfettered hedonism. This is the world Frans de Geetere depicted in his erotic etchings for a variety of scandalous books published during the decade. One such volume was Jean de Gourmont’s romantic novel La toison d’or (The Golden Fleece), a tale of two young lovers’ difficult and torturous relationship. De Gourmont described de Geetere’s illustrations as:

‘...displaying a rare erotic talent, [that] show miraculously and without insulting precision the aura of sensual mysticism I too had sought in which to bathe my ideas and my dreams’.

De Gourmont’s book is long forgotten, but de Geetere’s etchings continue to resonate with succeeding generations who find his work “sombre and disquieting, infused with a miasma of conflicted sexuality and existential dread.”

Frans de Geetere was born François de Geetere in Oudergem, a suburb of Brussels, in 1895. He studied art at the Beaux-Arts in Brussels. He hated his tutors’ insistence on classical representations in art and quit college in 1915. His friend, the rich, debauched libertine Harry Crosby later described this act of rebellion as being “whipped into a flame of hatred by the frescoes his father compelled him to paint in the neighboring churches.” He took a job whitewashing houses. He was nineteen, no longer at college, and eligible for conscription into the Belgian army to fight in World War One. He fled to the Netherlands, which was neutral during the conflict, and worked as a porter at the William Arntz psychiatric hospital in Utrecht. He found this work dispiriting and at times deeply disturbing. However, this together with the daily newspaper reports of fighting across Belgium and France, focussed his ambition to succeed as an artist. He changed his style from naive colorful depictions of fantasy and imagination to dark, brooding, portraits of the patients at the psychiatric clinic. During this time that de Geetere also met the woman who became his life partner, artist May den Engelsen.

The couple lived on a two-masted houseboat called the Marie-Jeanne. After the war, they decided to steer their boat along the canals to Paris. It was a slow leisurely journey during which the couple drew and painted and used a small printing press to publish their work. They arrived in Paris in the early 1920s berthing their boat at the Quai de Conti near the Pont Neuf, in the very heart of the city. They were to live here for the next five decades.

In Paris de Geertere and den Engelsen fell in with a group of rich hedonistic bohemians. It was a world of parties, sex, drugs, and orgies. The Marie-Jeanne became a “symbol of free-floating morals”:

...conveniently moored at the heart of the world’s cultural capital, the Marie-Jeanne became a hippy sanctuary long before hippies were invented. Avant garde artists Tamara de Lempicka and Kees van Dongen were regular visitors, as were American emigré millionaire and publisher Harry Crosby and his beautiful and inventive wife Caresse. During the late 1920s and early 30s Harry and Caresse became intimate with Frans and May, sharing art, poetry, partners, beds and experiences with drugs

Crosby was a notorious millionaire spendthrift who was as famous for publishing works by James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Dorothy Parker, and William Faulkner, as he was notorious for his life of sex and drugs. He eventually died in a murder-suicide pact after losing all his money in the Wall Street Crash.

De Geertere played hard and worked harder. He supplied illustrations for books of cult literature and erotica like La toison d’or (1925), Les Aphrodites (1925), Arthur Rimbaud’s Les stupra (1925), Les Chants de Maldoror (1927), La légende des sexes (1930), and his self-published volume Spasmes (1930) which he described as depicting love-making, sex and the orgasm as filled with:

...anxiety, violence and spasm, for this is undoubtedly true poetry. I do not care to please people who imagine love as sexual kindness, and its representation as the sign of genteel rendezvous.

De Geertere’s work has lasted because it was created through a synthesis of great technical talent and considerable personal experience. These are not pictures of imaginary figures but real women and men engaged in carnal acts in small darkened rooms where the gas light flickers and there’s a dank smell of sex and sweat. By the early fifties, De Geertere’s work fell out of favor as erotica was replaced by glossy pornography. He returned to painting bright colorful pictures as he had done in his youth and spent his freetime flying kites.
 
02fransaprosandhrclient.jpg
‘A Prostitute and Her Client.’
 
01fransmarthe.jpg
‘Marthe.’
 
See more erotic etchings, after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
|
10.05.2017
09:48 am
|
Why can’t you read the punk history ‘American Hardcore’ in California state prison?
09.28.2017
07:53 am
Topics:
Tags:


 
If you get sent up the river in California and you like to read about music, better stick to biographies of Tommy Dorsey and Rudy Vallee. State prisons have banned the book American Hardcore: A Tribal History on the grounds that it “shows obscene material displaying penetration of the vagina or anus.” That’s false, says the book’s publisher, Feral House: “Not a single risqué image in the whole book.”

American Hardcore, now in its second edition, is the popular history of hardcore punk that was the basis for the 2006 documentary of the same name. Earlier this week, Feral House’s Facebook account posted a letter from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to the book’s author, Steven Blush:

Dear Steven Blush-Feral House Publishing:

This letter is to advise you that your publication entitled, American Hardcore, A Tribal History, Second Edition, by Steven Blush has been placed on the Centralized List of Disapproved Publications by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and will not be delivered to CDCR inmates statewide.

This decision is based on the violation of the California Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 15, Section 3006, Contraband. The publication shows obscene material displaying penetration of the vagina or anus and shall not be delivered to the inmate(s), as it violates Department policy.


Last year, the Virginia Department of Corrections banned the GWAR coffee-table book Let There Be GWAR, which at least includes some pictures of genitals and bodily fluids that might keep a reader company during the cold penitentiary nights. As I recall, the worst obscenities in American Hardcore are musical, along the lines of Discharge’s Grave New World or SSD’s How We Rock.

“Hardcore.” They must have mistaken it for a book about porn, you think.

Continues after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Oliver Hall
|
09.28.2017
07:53 am
|
When Stephen King met ‘Pennywise the Clown’
09.22.2017
09:31 am
Topics:
Tags:

01penwisesking.jpg
 
Big Stephen King was on his way home. Last leg of a whirlwind book tour. Seven cities in six days. All for his latest 426-page blockbuster Dead Zone. Now it was back to his wife Tabitha and the kids. Big Stephen King. Six-foot-three. Blue-eyed. Gangly-limbed with his thick square glasses and that goofy smile that can leave you uncertain whether he’s gonna laugh or bite. King sitting in first class on a Delta airline’s plane, just a hop and skip back to his hometown of Bangor, Maine. The tour had been a blast. Signing books (“Hope you enjoy this book as much as I did writing it!”), palm-pressing (“I’m your number one fan”), and talking about where he got his ideas (“Everywhere”).

King was tired (disconnected) like he’d been bludgeoned with pillows filled with some kind of low-grade knockout gas. Flump! Headful of cotton. King buckled up. The stewardess mimed her safety routine, smiled, counted heads, checked seatbelts and made sure tray tables were upright and folded away. The plane was on the runway. Taxiing for take-off. And that’s were it started to go wrong. The plane slowed down. Came to rest. Instead of taking off this big metal behemoth nosed around and headed back to the apron.

(“Oh, geez, we’ve got some kind of motor problem; this is just what I need.”)

But it wasn’t the engines, it was just a late boarder. Must be someone mighty important if they’re going to all this trouble. It was Ronald McDonald.

Ronald McDonald with his ghost white face, blood red lips, big red nose, goofy orange hair, giant flapping boots, and those Day-Glo clothes with buttons down the front. Ronald-Mc-fucking-Donald. King knew exactly where this sonofabitch was gonna sit. (Beep, beep!) “Because I’m a weirdness magnet.”
 
02penysking.jpg
 
Ronald slumped down into the aisle seat next to King. (“Knew it.”) Ronald looked shabby. Smelled like day-old sweat, cigarettes, and cheap aftershave. He called the stewardess over and ordered a gin-and-tonic. It’s ten o’clock in the morning. The drink arrives with its little paper coaster. Ronald knocked it back. Then turned to King and said:

“I hate these whistle-stop tours. I just hate this. I almost missed this plane.”

The plane takes off. King’s going “Uh-huh, uh-huh, yeah, right” to whatever the hell Ronald is saying. The no-smoking light blinks off and Ronald, swilling his G & T with its ice cubes chinking, popped opened a pack of cancer sticks. He lights up and started breathing in a Kent. King was getting antsy. “What the fuck do you say to a clown?” Eventually, he asked:

“So, where did you come from?”

Ronald looked the great writer up-and-down considering if this was a question worthy of a full sentence or just a one-word answer.

“McDonaldland,” he said.

Continues after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
|
09.22.2017
09:31 am
|
1870 A Space Odyssey: Astoundingly prophetic illustrations for Jules Verne’s ‘Around the Moon’
09.14.2017
07:19 am
Topics:
Tags:

021julesmoon.jpg
 
Top fact: Jules Verne is the most translated French author ever.

Second slightly more impressive fact: Jules Verne is the second most translated author in the world, not too far behind Agatha Christie but ahead of William Shakespeare.

In the English-speaking world, Monsieur Verne may still have the reputation as a children’s author whose best-selling books have provided prime material for a lot of Hollywood movies but in truth, Jules Verne is the “Father of Science-Fiction.” Verne produced his best-known works like Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870), and Around the World in Eighty Days (1873), long before his nearest rival H.G. Wells ever considered putting pen to paper.

At school, Jules Verne was the type of author whose novels were doled out during reading class and awarded (if you were lucky) at prize givings for academic excellence. That kind of thing. There was something wholesome about Verne and to an extent, H.G. Wells. A real belief that reading these authors inspired the right kind of enquiring mind—one driven by an interest in understanding the world through scientific investigation. Which was kinda strange as our teachers were a bunch of Christian Brothers whose remit was to instill the fear of God, teach some useful education, and offer the requisite religious instruction to live a good Catholic life.

Well, I suppose one out of three isn’t bad for the effort.

This was when America was firing rockets at the Moon, something that made Verne seem prescient and relevant in a way figures like Nostradamus never do. I’d read From the Earth to the Moon and thought it interesting but slightly disappointing as (unlike say Wells’ The First Men in the Moon with its insectoid creatures the Selenites) the book was mainly concerned with the scientific practicalities facing the Baltimore Gun Club in their ambitions (and rivalries) to send a rocket to the Moon. I was far more impressed by the follow-up novel Around the Moon which continued the adventures of the first three astronauts—Impey Barbicane, Captain Nicholl, and Michel Ardan (along with their dog)—who were fired in a bullet-shaped rocket from a giant cannon—the Columbiad space gun—up into space.

Verne’s novels were highly entertaining and his ideas always seemed feasible. One book, Paris in the Twentieth Century, which was written in 1863 but not published until 1994 having languished in locked bronze safe for almost a century, described the very world in which we live today, as Oliver Tearle notes in his compendium The Secret Library:

[Paris in the Twentieth Century] had been written in 1863 but [was] set in the then far-off future world of 1960. It described a world in which people drive motorcars powered by internal combustion and travel to work in driverless trains. Their houses are lit by electric light. They use fax machines, telephones and computers, and live in skyscrapers furnished with elevators and television. The criminals are executed using the electric chair. Greek and Latin are no longer widely taught in schools, and the French language has been ‘corrupted’ by borrowings from English. People shop in huge department stores, and the streets are adorned with advertisements in electric lights. Money has become everyone’s god. The novel also describes a tall structure in Paris, an electric lighthouse that can be seen for miles around. This was in 1863; the Eiffel Tower would not be built until 1889.

Similarly, many of the ideas in Around the Moon are scientifically possible and uncannily descriptive of how an Apollo misison to the Moon would return to Earth—jet rockets for thrust and a landing in the sea. The artist Émile-Antoine Bayard was tasked with illustrating Verne’s novel and he produced a set of images which are rightly described as “arguably the very first to depict space travel on a scientific basis.”
 
01julesmoon.jpg
 
02julesmoon.jpg
 
Take off with more incredible illustrations from Verne’s ‘Around the Moon,’ after the jump…
 

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
|
09.14.2017
07:19 am
|
Fantastic Beasts: Fabulous illustrations from classic Persian book of fables
08.31.2017
09:47 am
Topics:
Tags:

01canopus.jpg
 
Once upon a time, in the land of Persia, there lived a very wise old King called Anushirvan who had heard of an ancient book of tales told by animals and reptiles and the birds of the air. The King he decided he would very much like to read this book as he had read all of the other books in his library and he desperately wanted something new to read at bedtime so he could completely relax after his wearisome day ruling and begetting stuff and doing kingly things. The King asked his doctor, Burzuyah, who was the smartest man he knew, to go off in search of this book and bring it back to him. One bright early morning before the birds started singing, Burzuyah left the King’s palace and went off in search of this fantastic book of tales.

The book is called Anvār-i Suhaylī or Lights of Canopus and that is how our story begins. It sets the frame within which we are told a series of inter-related fables mostly involving animals that are intended to offer good counsel to the reader.

For example, one story (which sounds a bit like The Gruffalo) tells of a big, greedy, ferocious lion and a smart, little hare. When the lion meets the hare, he asks him why he is so late as he was due to be the lion’s dinner hours ago. The hare is most apologetic and tells the lion he is ever so sorry for being late but an even bigger, greedier, far more ferocious lion had stopped him on his way and tried to eat him. Thankfully, the hare escaped otherwise he would never have been in time for his dinner appointment. The lion thinks he’s got a rival so asks the hare to lead him to this other lion. The hare does so, taking the lion to the still of a pond where he points to the lion’s reflection on the surface of the water. The lion is so enraged by the look of this other ferocious beast that he jumps straight into the water and drowns.

Another tale recounts how a cat is caught in the net of a hunter’s trap. The rat the cat had been chasing is happy to see his old adversary caught. But then the rat realizes that without the cat’s protection, he is vulnerable to attack from some of the cat’s other prey like the owl and the weasel. Knowing the cat is trapped, the owl circles the sky looking for the rat to feast on. While the weasel sneaks behind a tree waiting for the rat to return home, so he can have him for his dinner. The rat decides it would be best to free the cat and begins to gnaw through the ropes that hold him. All the while, the rat implores the cat not to eat when he is free. The cat agrees but somehow his words never quite reassure the rat. So the rat decides to set the cat free at the very last moment when the hunter returns. The hunter returns. The owl flies away. The weasel runs home. The rat bites through the last rope. The cat flees from the trap and hides up a tree. And the rat goes back to his home knowing he is safe once again.

You get the drift.

And so the stories go with one tale setting up the next and so on. The idea is that the reader will learn something from these stories about human nature and perhaps about themselves…
 
02canopus.jpg
 
03canopus.jpg
 
04canopus.jpg
 
More fabulous illustrations, after the jump…
 

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
|
08.31.2017
09:47 am
|
The hilariously f*cked-up art of defacing kids’ coloring books (NSFW)
08.25.2017
09:09 am
Topics:
Tags:

05colorcorr.jpg
 
Looking for a scintillating opening paragraph to begin this piece on hilariously defaced kids’ coloring books, I thought it’d be fun to share a few of the images with a psychoanalyst friend to get his take. Oh boy, was that a bad idea. His eventual response after a few hours of email silence was:

I’d really like to ask the question “Where did the bad man touch you?”

Note to self: Humor and analysis don’t mix.

Second note to self: Never go to an analyst.

But at least I got my opener, well, other than saying:

You’ll never be able to look your favorite childhood cartoon characters in the eye again after a swatch of these Coloring Book Corruptions. Just take a moment to look at what they’ve done to poor Eeyore or innocent little Bambi and darn-it! even Bert ‘n’ Ernie and you’ll see what I mean. (Though to be fair, the Bert ‘n’ Ernie picture does seem somehow kinda likely, though why I’m not quite sure.)

Since the dawn of cave paintings and other cliched tropes, people have been drawing dicks and tits and generally fucking up other people’s artwork with occasional gut-busting results. Admit it. What was more fun in high school? Listening to the calculus teacher drone on about whatever the fuck calculus is or drawing dicks on the pictures in some text book?

The doodling talent behind Coloring Book Corruptions explains how it all started out of “boredom.”

Boredom will produce a wide variety of things. One fine day whilst visiting my cousin, we decided to color. If not for her enjoyment of this hobby, this past time would have never been born. We sat down to begin and I casually flipped through a rather large coloring book. Perhaps it was fated that this particular coloring book was full of slightly deranged looking animals. I could not help but imagine them plotting and feuding with one another. Inspired, I began to turn a seemingly innocent children’s coloring book into something both awful and hilarious (at least to me). I feel this concept should be shared with the world based on the twisted amusement it has brought me.

Coloring Book Corruptions seemed to disappear for a couple of years (or maybe that was just me not paying attention), but now you too can enhance some treasured childhood memory with some pencils or crayons right here.
 
022colcorr.jpg
 
012colcorr.jpg
 
More comic coloring book chortles, after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
|
08.25.2017
09:09 am
|
Live from the bardo: Éliane Radigue’s synth interpretation of ‘The Tibetan Book of the Dead’
08.24.2017
08:30 am
Topics:
Tags:


Éliane Radigue as pictured on the cover of ‘Feedback Works 1969-1970
 
In 1988, the electronic composer Éliane Radigue completed Kyema, Intermediate States, a sonic representation of the after-death state described in the Bardo Thödol (or Tibetan Book of the Dead). It became the first section of her three-part meditation on death, Trilogie de la Mort.

Radigue became a Buddhist (with, it’s said, a push from Terry Riley) in the mid-seventies, and Tibetan Buddhism is the subject of much of her subsequent work; she has, for example, composed music based on the life and songs of Milarepa.

Since every source I’ve consulted describes the trilogy as a response to the death of Radigue’s son, Yves Arman, to whom Kyema is dedicated, and to the death of one of her spiritual teachers, it’s worth pointing out that Kyema was completed and had already made its debut when Yves Arman died suddenly in a car crash the following year. Similarly, my powerful search engine only turns up bhikkus associated with Radigue (Pawo Rinpoche and Kunga Rinpoche, in their pertinent incarnations) who died in 1991. So I begin to doubt these deaths inspired the work in its initial stage.
 

 
A limited, numbered edition of Trilogie de la Mort came packaged in a skull sculpted by Radigue’s former husband, the artist Arman.

Continues after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Oliver Hall
|
08.24.2017
08:30 am
|
Bad trips and clowning for Christ: An unbelievable collection truly awful library books
08.21.2017
10:36 am
Topics:
Tags:


The fantastic cover of the 2006 book, ‘Knitting With Balls.’
 
I have to give it to the dynamic duo of Mary Kelly and Holly Hibner—a pair of public librarians in Michigan who run the fantastic site Awful Library Books. For about a decade Kelly and Hibner have been posting images of what they describe as “amusing and questionable” library books they have found, as well as submissions from their fans. To date, the site has posted 634 pages full of bizarre books covering topics on the dangers of ritual satanic abuse to the riveting sounding Wonders of Dust—a 79-page book published in 1980 about fucking DUST.

Before I knew it, I had dug through 100 pages on Awful Library Books before I forced myself to walk away from my desk because I couldn’t stop clicking to see what literary horrors were on the next page. Kelly and Hibner are pretty much the greatest people alive, and their prolific work has been featured in TIME, and on Jimmy Kimmel Live! I’ve posted a ton of images from Awful Library Books below, all of which defy logical explanation.
 

The cover of the 1977 book, ‘Looking Forward To Being Attacked.’
 

A page from inside of ‘Looking Forward To Being Attacked.’
 
More after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Cherrybomb
|
08.21.2017
10:36 am
|
Page 2 of 80  < 1 2 3 4 >  Last ›