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Animated children’s stories by Nick Cave, Gary Numan, Will Oldham, Tom Waits, Laura Marling & more!


Cover illustration by Daniel Nayeri

Stories for Ways and Means is a new book that features original “grown up” children’s story collaborations by some of this era’s most compelling storytellers from the worlds of music and contemporary art. It’s being published by the long-running indie record label Waxploitation run by entrepreneur and photojournalist Jeff Antebi. The Stories for Ways and Means project lends support to several non-governmental organizations and nonprofit groups aiding children’s literacy causes around the world including Room to Read, Pencils of Promise, 826 National and many more.

Some of the featured musicians contributing to the project include Frank Black, Laura Marling, Del the Funky Homosapien, Gibby Haynes, Alec Empire, Kathleen Hanna, Devendra Banhart, Nick Cave, Alison Mosshart, Satomi Matsuzaki of Deerhoof, Will Oldham, Gary Numan and ska great, guitarist Ernest Ranglin.

You can order the Stories for Ways and Means book at SFWAM.org
 

“The Lonely Giant,” narrated by Andre Royo (The Wire), written by Nick Cave, illustrated by Anthony Lister.
 
Many more after the jump…

READ ON
Posted by Richard Metzger
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09.12.2018
08:44 am
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Appalachian Gothic: Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy’s ‘Blindlessness,’ exclusive video premiere
01.20.2015
11:49 am
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When you’re Will Oldham aka Bonnie “Prince” Billy, you can pretty much do whatever the hell you want. And the man certainly exercises this hard won artistic freedom, confident that the faithful will follow. Oldham lets his poetic muse travel wherever it takes him, even if that means revisiting older material that’s… not really even all that old.

That’s what happens on his latest long player, Singer’s Grave - A Sea of Tongues, Oldham’s 11th under his Bonnie “Prince” Billy moniker, where all but two of the songs are reworked versions of numbers from 2011’s Wolfroy Goes to Town along with additional material that originally saw the light of day on the “Time to be Clear” single. This time around, for the most part, Oldham is backed by a proper band with pedal steel, fiddles, banjos—including Chris Scruggs, grandson of Earl on mandolin and ukulele and the gospel singing McCrary Sisters—and the sparse songs of Wolfroy are reworked and given more upbeat arrangements, comparatively speaking.
 

 
For “Blindlessness,” the desolate middle-of-the-night solemnity of the ghostly narration (reminding me, for whatever reason, of an eerie Appalachian take on Samuel Beckett’s Krapp’s Last Tape, a comparison I suspect would please Oldham) is greatly enhanced by the ethereal overdubbing of Oldham’s voice. It takes two listens for this song to truly sink in. I liked it the first time I heard it, the second time, it blew me away. “Blindlessness” is the b-side of the “Mindlessness” 7” single, available January 27, 2015 on Drag City Inc. & Palace Records (iTunes). Video directed by Kyle Armstrong.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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01.20.2015
11:49 am
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Slint and Will Oldham discuss that famous ‘Spiderland’ album cover
12.18.2014
11:41 am
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Brashear, Walford, and Oldham treading water
 
Spiderland was that haunting and evocative bit of early-‘90s indie rock, the second (and final) album from Slint, four fellows from Louisville, Kentucky, the reconstituted shards of Squirrel Bait. It took a long while, but it has emerged as one of the profoundly influential albums of the post-classic era, contributing to the foundations of post-rock and inspiring acts as disparate as P.J. Harvey, Pavement, Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Mogwai, and Sebadoh. No small part of the album’s appeal derives from the photograph that graces the cover, a black-and-white, ever-so-blurry pic of the band members bobbing in the waters of a quarry somewhere. The picture suggests the frolics of summer and youth, but the lack of color lends it a foreboding aura—a wholly apt introduction to the bracing, enervating music of the album. The picture was taken by Will Oldham, a buddy of the band’s who went on to record scads of music under the name Bonnie “Prince” Billy, among others.

In the following clip, filmmaker Lance Bangs brought Oldham and Slint members Britt Walford (drums) and Todd Brashear (bass) together to reminisce about the shooting of that cover. There’s some talk of Slint guitarist Brian McMahan cooking up some mayhem with a “sacrificial goat” and the entire band, save McMahan, getting arrested for trespassing. It’s evident that the quarry is the site of a tony residential community of some kind, we catch a glimpse of a billboard for a building development company from southern Indiana called Quarry Bluff, which bills itself as (initial caps and all) “A Unique Development Located on the Banks of the Ohio River in Utica, Indiana Just Across the New East End Bridge!” So it appears that the quarry isn’t in Kentucky at all but in Jefferson, Indiana.

This clip comes from Breadcrumb Trail, Bangs’ recent documentary on the band and the album. The clip ends with Oldham, Brashear, and Walford jumping into the water to re-create the album cover as best they can.
 

 
via Biblioklept

Posted by Martin Schneider
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12.18.2014
11:41 am
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