follow us in feedly
‘Psychedelic Shake’: Acid trips and liquid hips
11.16.2011
08:25 pm

Topics:
Drugs
Music

Tags:

image
 
Here’s a groovy new mix for DM readers and listeners. “Psychedelic Shake” features 11 Sixties garage rarities. Enjoy.

01. “Filled With Fear” - Iron Butterfly
02. “Here And Her Mountain” - Frantic
03. “Bad Part Of Town” - The Seeds
04. “Can’t Get You Out Of My Mind” - The Tempests
05. “Apricot Brandy” - Rhinoceros
06. “Please Don’t Leave Me” - The Ingredients
07. “Show Me The Way” - Free For All
08. “The Light Hurts My Eyes” Great Scots
09. “I Who Have Nothing” - Liquid Smoke
10. “Midnite Thoughts” - The World Column
11. “Young Man” - Morning Dew
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
So, you want to be an Astronaut?
11.16.2011
07:08 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Science/Tech

Tags:

space7
 
So you want to be an astronaut?

Well, here’s your chance as the people over at NASA are currently seeking candidates for “astronaut positions”:

If you have dreamed of joining the Astronaut Corps, now is the time to apply. NASA is continuing space exploration programs that will include missions beyond low Earth orbit.

NASA, the world’s leader in space and aeronautics is always seeking outstanding scientists, engineers, and other talented professionals to carry forward the great discovery process that its mission demands. Creativity. Ambition. Teamwork. A sense of daring. And a probing mind. That’s what it takes to join NASA, one of the best places to work in the Federal Government.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a need for Astronaut Candidates to support the International Space Station (ISS) Program and future deep space exploration activities.

It was in 1959 that NASA selected the 7 military personnel who became the first astronauts. Since then, 330 have been chose from diverse backgrounds, who all passed the strict physical, technical and academic requirements. The backgrounds of NASA’s latest group of Astronaut Candidates include schoolteachers, doctors, scientist, and engineers. According to Geek Sugar, you could now be one too if you have:

US citizenship

Height between 62 and 72-inches, as well as a resting blood pressure not to exceed 140/90.

20/20 vision, though corrective eye surgeries like LASIK are allowed.

Bachelor’s degree in engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science, or mathematics. Despite the space flight factor, aviation degrees do not qualify.

3 years of relevant professional experience or 1,000 hours of pilot-in-command time in a jet aircraft.

Of course, qualifying doesn’t mean you’ll end up floating in a tin can, but you will have as much chance as everyone else who applies - and the pay’s pretty neat at $64,000-141,000 per year - so, why the hell not?

Check here for details.
 

 
Via Geek Sugar
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
L’Histoire D’Anne Pigalle
11.16.2011
06:01 pm

Topics:
Art
Music

Tags:

image
 
Anne Pigalle weaves her magic in this short biographical film, L’Histoire D’Anne Pigalle.

Made in 2001, during a point when the legendary chanteuse was re-examining her life, the film looks back on her creative life, from childhood through first bands, to the release of her classic debut album Everything Could Be So Perfect in 1985, to her slow disillusionment, as she questioned the value of her fame and success.

Since making L’Histoire D’Anne Pigalle, Anne has established herself as a multi-media artist, mixing art, photography and painting, with live performance. Last year, Ms Pigalle made a triumphant return to the top of the tree with her beautiful and spell-binding album L’âmerotica Part I and II, which was quickly followed-up earlier this year, with the stunning L’âme érotique.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

‘L’âmerotica’: The Return of the Brilliant Anne Pigalle


 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Occupy London: A New Age of Rebellion

image
 
Rumors are flying around that the Occupy London encampment outside of St Paul’s Cathedral will be evicted tomorrow. Describing what he calls the “greatest upsurge of student radicalism since the 1960s,” Owen Jones, author of the important new book Chavs: The Demonization of the Underclass (Verso), takes stock of what’s been achieved so far, and what’s still ahead for the Occupy and student movements in Great Britain in a thought-provoking essay posted on Dazed Digital:

Ever present in the minds of Occupiers and student radicals alike is the legacy of the anti-war movement. Up to 2 million marched against the Iraq war but – as is frequently raised at meetings of British radicals – the invasion happened anyway. It’s seen as an indictment of the strategy of the so-called ‘A to B march’ – turn up, demonstrate, go home. That’s partly what’s given the impetus to Occupy: the strategy is that protests have to be made impossible to ignore.

Occupy doesn’t offer a direct challenge to the power of the economic elite; but it has certainly transformed the debate. Questions that the media likes to ignore – like the nature of capitalism – are being discussed in newspaper comment pieces and radio phone-ins. The Tories have turned a banking crisis into a crisis of public spending; Occupy reminds us of the real villains. And it has broad public sympathy, too: one poll showed that, while 38% felt the protesters were “naïve” because “there is no practical alternative to capitalism”, a whopping 52% thought that “the protesters are right to want to call time on a system that puts profit before people.”

Both Occupy and the student radicals should be seen as different – but overlapping – wings of the same movement: indeed, on the latest student protest, held on 9th November, activists attempted to march on the City in solidarity. While there are Occupiers from a range of age groups, younger activists are particularly prominent outside St Paul’s.

It’s not surprising that young people have taken the lead in the protest movements that have sprung up under Coalition rule. There’s the obvious: one of the Government parties promised the abolition of fees, but instead the cost of a university education has been tripled. But students in particular are often the first to move because – frankly – they have more time on their hands than working people; they are not dependent on a full-time job for sustenance; and they do not have responsibilities like keeping a family fed. With less of a stake in the system, there are fewer consequences when it comes to take off their gloves and fighting back.

But it’s also a symptom of a perfect storm hammering British youth. Unemployment has now hit one in five among 18 to 24-year-olds; what work there is available is often in the form of low-paid, insecure, poorly regarded service sector jobs; there are 5 million people languishing on social housing waiting lists while private rents soar, leaving a generation without the prospect of an affordable home; cuts are hitting youth services; and, as well as the trebling of tuition fees, the Educational Maintenance Allowance has been abolished. For the first time since World War II, the promise that the next generation will be better off than the last has abruptly ended.

Occupy and the student radicals are just two symptoms of a generation without prospects. As an ideologically charged austerity programme reshapes British society, the ranks of this so-called “lost generation” will only grow. But so too will the protests, occupations and strikes. A new age of revolt is upon us.

Occupy London: A New Age of Rebellion (Dazed Digital)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Michele Bachmann goes ‘scorched earth’ on Mitt, Ron, Herman, Newt & one of the Ricks

image
 
She says what she means and means what she says. She’s also got a snowball’s chance in Hell of making it to the White House and everyone—EVERYONE—except for her knows it.

Still, that’s not going to stop quixotic crazypants Rep. Michele Bachmann from making sure that none of the other Republican candidates get there, either!

She really kicks her opponents in the nuts here. The DNC ought to chip in so she can run more of this one. Rick Santorum and Jon Huntsman should pony up, too!

Bachmann is burning quite a few bridges with this video and stands to gain almost nothing from it. I laughed out loud at the audaciousness of this move. From her point of view, she’s entirely correct, of course, that she’s the most consistent conservative candidate—albeit the most batshit crazy in a field full of some real lulu’s—running. The problem is that she’s contrasting her own completely insane positions as the opposite of these goofballs, blow-hards and idiots at their most reasonable!

Too much pork for the fork!
 

 
H/T Daily Kos

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Nile Rodgers’ ‘Le Freak’: Music biography of the year
11.16.2011
03:57 pm

Topics:
Books
Dance
Drugs
Heroes
History
Music

Tags:

image
 
Yes, I am aware that Marc Campbell writing on this blog last month claimed that Everything Is An Afterthought: The Life and Writings of Paul Nelson is the music book of the year—which is why I have fudged the terms here and inserted the word “biography” into the headline. Shouldn’t there be a distinction between writers on music and musicians who write anyway? Well, it doesn’t really matter if you are more interested in the story or the music, as Nile Rodgers’ autobiography Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco and Destiny is packed to the last page with stories and anecdotes that will have you picking your jaw up off the floor.

If you consider yourself a music fan, then Nile Rodgers needs no introduction. He is a hardcore, bona-fide music industry legend. He not only co-wrote some of the biggest hits of the Seventies with his partner Bernard Edwards in the band Chic (“Le Freak”, “Good Times”, “We Are Family”), and produced some of the biggest records of the 80s (Madonna’s Like A Virgin, David Bowie’s Let’s Dance, Duran Duran’s Notorious, Diana Ross’ Diana.) His skills as a guitarist are beyond any doubt and have influenced a generation of musicians not only in the disco, funk and dance genres but further afield in post-punk and even hard rock. At a recent gig in Manchester, Rodgers’ Chic Organisation was joined onstage by The Smiths’ Johnny Marr who sat in on “Le Freak”—the pairing might seem unusual, but listen to their guitar styles and the influence is clear.

Le Freak is Rodgers’ candid autobiography, and what a tale he has to tell. Not only is this one of the most fascinating stories in modern music, with a cast list of some of the biggest stars in the world, but it’s also one of the most under-documented so to hear it coming from the proverbial horse’s mouth is a delight. There’s drugs, sex, rock’n’roll, drugs, booze, disco, hippies, drugs, Black Panthers, bohemians, buppies, drugs and some more drugs for good measure. The years spent playing and writing in Chic, while not given short thrift, are not the main focus of the book. Chic have been well documented elsewhere, in particular the book Everbody Dance: Chic and the Politics of Disco by Darren Easley. But where that book leaves off—namely the coke-fuelled 80s—is where Le Freak really kicks in to gear, with Rodgers working with Ross, Bowie, Ciccone and snorting his way through the GDP of a small country. Any mere mortal would be dead from the amount of coke Rodgers scoffed, but what’s even more impressive is his hardcore work ethic and the fact that he managed to keep it all together (and tight!) while under the influence.

But it’s the early years of Rodgers’ life that are the unexpected highlight. To call his upbringing unusual would be an understatement. Born to his mother when she was just 13, and only a few years before she became a full-time heroin addict, Nile travelled with his mother or one of his grandmothers between New York and LA during the 50s and 60s. His musically gifted father wasn’t present, but Nile ran into him in a couple of times on the street, and got to witness his vagrant lifestyle first hand in a couple of heart-breaking reminiscences. In Los Angeles, at the age of 13, Rodgers drops acid at a hippie pad and ends up hanging out with Timothy Leary. In New York, at the more wizened age of 17, he finds himself tripping balls in a hospital emergency ward as Andy Warhol is wheeled in, having just been shot by Valerie Solanas. This being the kind of incredible life that Rodgers leads, he is able to meet both men later on in life, in very different circumstances, and recount these tales directly to them. He credits events and coincidences like this in his life as something called “hippie happenstance.”

Yet, despite all the major celebrities who make regular appearances throughout the book (I particularly liked the story of meeting Eddie Murphy), this remains distinctly the Nile Rodgers story. It’s clear how important family is to the man, and despite his own family’s unusual set-up and dysfunction, it’s the Rodgers’ clan who are the anchor in this wild tale (even despite their own wild times consuming and selling drugs). Nile’s parents may have been junkies, and genetically predisposed him to his alcoholism, but they taught him about fine art, music, fashion and culture, which is not how heroin-addicted parents are generally perceived by the public.

Le Freak is an excellent book, and worth reading whether you like disco music or not. Nile Rodgers’  is one of the most important composers/musicians/producers of the 20th century, and it’s good to see him finally getting his due. But despite creating the biggest selling single for his then label, Atlantic, and producing the biggest break-out records for a generation of 80s pop superstars, it still packs a punch to read about the discrimination that Rodgers and his music faced from within the industry:

A few weeks later I did a remix of a song of [Duran Duran’s] called “The Reflex”. Unfortunately, as much as Duran Duran liked the remix, their record company wasn’t happy, and I was soon in an oddly similar situation to the conflict Nard and I had had with Diana Ross’ people.

Nick Rhodes called me moments after the band had excitedly previewed my retooling of “The Reflex” to the suits at Capitol Records. “Nile” he began, his monotone stiff-upper-lip English accent barely hiding his despair. “We have a problem”.

My stomach tightened. “What’s up Nick?”

He struggled to find the words. “Capitol hates the record” he finally said.

I was stunned. “The Reflex” was a smash. I was sure of it. This was déja vu all over again.

“How do you guys feel about it?” I asked a little defensively.

“Nile, we love it. But Capitol hates it so much they don’t want to release it. They say it’s too black sounding.”

Too black sounding? I tried not to hit the roof, but in a way it was nice to hear it put so plain. Finally someone had just come out and said it.

image
 
Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco and Destiny by Nile Rodgers is available here.

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Nile Rodgers dishes the dirt on Atlantic Records
Miles Davis talks about his art on Nile Rodgers’ ‘New Visions

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Leave a comment
Faces of Meth: The effects of meth on a pumpkin
11.16.2011
03:36 pm

Topics:
Amusing
Drugs

Tags:

image
Photo by Redditor therealgreenbeans
 
That’s the worst case of “meth mouth” I’ve ever seen!

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
Deep End: Darren Aronofsky’s HARDCORE anti-meth PSAs

(via reddit)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Karl Rove gets mic-checked, loses his shit: ‘Who gave you the right to Occupy America?’

image
 
Let me jog your memory Karl: That would be the framers of the Constitution. It’s their birthright as Americans, fuckwit!

Hilarious. Last night at Johns Hopkins University, the man who history will ruefully recall as “Bush’s Brain,” Fox News commentator Karl Rove, got the business from Occupy Baltimore. He didn’t handle it too well…

Via Think Progress:

“Karl Rove is the architect of Occupy Iraq, the architect of Occupy Afghanistan!” yelled the demonstrators. Occupy Baltimore had infiltrated the crowd and began chanting against Rove. “Who gave you the right to occupy America?” asked Rove to the protesters, apparently unaware of the Bill of Rights. As they repeated their slogan, “We are the 99 percent!” Rove petulantly responded, “No you’re not!” He snidely added, “You wanna keep jumping up and yelling that you’re the 99 percent? How presumptuous and arrogant can you be?”

Johns Hopkins spokeswoman Tracey Reeves told the media that around 15 people, none of them students, were asked to leave and that some were forcibly removed by campus security. No one was arrested.

If you don’t want to listen to this lying turd’s lips flapping, you can scroll right to the 1:48 mark when the fun begins! As astonishing as it may sound, Karl Rove, one of the chief architects of the invasion of Iraq—not to mention much of what’s wrong with this country—seems to think he’s got a leg to stand on when lecturing people on “moral cowardice”! Incredible.

WHY should people be expected to be polite to a class warrior/war criminal like Karl Rove? He was the troll under the bridge of the Bush administration and now he’s getting paid as a propagandist on Fox News. HE deserves respect and politeness? He deserves to be dropped in the middle of the streets of Baghdad in the nude is what the fuck he deserves!

Get used to the rest of your life, doughboy. This isn’t going away. And even if your side wins a few battles along the way, our side is still going to win in the end.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Listen to Caribou’s ‘Nightmare Before Christmas Mix’
11.16.2011
02:54 pm

Topics:
Music

Tags:

image
 
Here’s an early Christmas gift from Caribou and All Tomorrow’s Parties:

From December 9th-11th 2011 at Butlins Holiday Centre, Minehead, UK, All Tomorrow’s Parties will present their yearly Nightmare Before Christmas festival. This year each day is curated by a different artist: Les Savy Fav on Friday, Battles on Saturday and Caribou on Sunday.

Please enjoy this amazing mix put together by Dan Snaith (Caribou), who has created an intense hour long journey through the artists chosen for his day of the event, highlighted by a new and previously unreleased remix of Improve Me by Junior Boys.

Tracklist:

01: Toro Y Moi - Intro / Chi Chi
02: Pharoah Sanders - Prince of Peace
03: Sun Ra Arkestra - Saturn Research
04: Pharoah Sanders Interview
05: Theo Parrish - Goin’ Downstairs Parts I & II
06: Getatchew Mekuria, The Ex & Guests - Aynamaye Nesh
07: Theo Parrish - Feel Free To Be Who You Need To Be
08: Junior Boys - Improve Me (Caribou Synthapella Mix)
09: Connan Mockasin - It’s Choa My Dear
10: Orchestra of Spheres - There Is No No
11:  Roll The Dice - The Suck
12:  Four Tet - Pyramid
13: Silver Apples - Oscillations
14: Roll The Dice - Cause and Effect
15: Factory Floor - Wooden Box
16: Omar Souleyman - Dabke (Daphni Edit)
17: Four Tet - Our Bells
18: Pharoah Sanders Interview
20: Sun Ra Arkestra - Space Is The Place

  
 
(via Testspeil.de)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
The Raid on Zuccotti Park

image
Above, “fair and balanced” Fox News graphic. Apparently even the art department there is staffed with braying assess.

Casey Neistat put together this “music video” of this week’s eviction of the Zuccotti Park protesters, cut to the music of guess which Frank Sinatra standard?

My office isn’t far from Zuccotti Park and when I heard it was being cleared I went down with my camera. I ended up filming for 18 hours until the Park was reopened at 6pm on November 15, 2011. The police presence was overwhelming, more than I’ve ever - more than during the blackout, more than the days after September 11th.

 

 
Via Glen E. Friedman

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Page 1293 of 2079 ‹ First  < 1291 1292 1293 1294 1295 >  Last ›