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Lesbian emojis are as adorable as they are sapphic!
08.15.2014
09:50 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art
Queer

Tags:
lesbian
emojis


As you can see, subtlety is a valued principle in today’s contemporary art.
 
Graphic designer Kimberly Linn and writer/actor Katie Streeter have breached the latest frontier in gay liberation—lesbian emojis. It was in the midst of Linn’s post-break-up depression that the idea was hatched, and now their rapidly growing Instagram account has almost 7,400 followers. There are a lot of lesbians with smart phones—the gay agenda is at hand!

The are the immediately recognizable emojis of stereotypical aesthetics, like the bow tie and the flannel. Then there are cultural signifiers that might go over the heads of the unaffiliated—the Home Depot, for the girl who can swing a hammer, and the moving van, a nod to the ladies’ rep for rapid cohabitation.  I (naturally) favor the vulgar ones—the pillow princess, the turkey baster, lesbian bed death, the double-clicked mouse, and, cleverly, the scissors.

The fish taco though… bold move, ladies.
 

moving van
 

flannel shirt
 

scissors
 
See more after the jump…
 

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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Blank slate: Hundreds of ‘White Albums’ take up residence in LIverpool art gallery
08.15.2014
06:59 am

Topics:
Art
Music

Tags:
The Beatles
White Album
Rutherford Chang


 
Dismissing claims by critics that the Beatles’ sole LP from 1968 would have worked better had the songs been curated into a tighter, single-disc release, Paul McCartney commented: “It was great. It sold. It’s the bloody Beatles’ White Album. Shut up!”

Amen to that. I’m a “late Beatles” guy, and, for me anyway, The White Album is utterly central to the Beatles’ allure. Artist Rutherford Chang appears to be a “late Beatles” guy too, and he’s making a decent bid to be regarded as the world’s number-one fan of The White Album and its decidedly minimalist cover by Richard Hamilton. He’s been buying up as many first pressings of the album as he can (the first pressing numbered more than three million). He now owns more than 1,000 first pressings of it, which he exhibits in spaces that are set up to resemble record shops: you can flip through the “inventory” just like at any record shop, and you are permitted to play any of the albums there on the provided record player. Unlike a record shop, however, the relation of consumer to establishment is reversed: You cannot buy anything there, but you can sell a first pressing of The White Album if you have one. The show is called “We Buy White Albums.”
 

 
Chang has exhibited the always-growing collection of albums for the last couple of years. “We Buy White Albums” has appeared in several locations in the United States as well as Shanghai, Denmark, and Ireland.
 

 
Last year, from January to March,  “We Buy White Albums” was exhibited at Recess, 41 Grand Street, New York. I was a resident of New York City during that time, but unfortunately I was out of town the entire period this show was on. I wish I’d been able to see it. Eilon Paz of Dust and Grooves interviewed Chang during that show, and it richly merits its status as the essential Rutherford Chang/White Album interview. Here are a few excerpts:
 

Q: Are you a vinyl collector?

A: Yes, I collect White Albums.

Q: Do you collect anything other than that?

A: I own some vinyl and occasionally buy other albums, but nothing in multiples like the White Album.

Q: Why just White Album? why not Abbey road? or Rubber Soul?

A: The White Album has the best cover. I have a few copies of Abbey Road and Rubber Soul, but I keep those in my “junk bin”.

Q: Why do you find it so great? It’s a white, blank cover. Are you a minimalist?

A: I’m most interested in the albums as objects and observing how they have aged. So for me, a Beatles album with an all white cover is perfect.

Q: Do you care about the album’s condition?

A: I collect numbered copies of the White Album in any condition. In fact I often find the “poorer” condition albums more interesting.

-snip-

Q: Are you collecting as an artist or as a music fan?

A: I’m collecting them as cultural artifacts.

Q: Do you listen to vinyl records on regular basis?

A: I listen to the White Album every day.

-snip-

Q: I’m trying to figure out if you’re a vinyl collector, or a music aficionado or an artist making an art piece with an object that happens to be a Beatles White album? Can you expand on that?

A: I’m making an art piece using White Albums as material. But the process also very much involves collecting vinyl and listening to music.

Q: Do you buy records other than the White Album for your art project?

A: I occasionally buy other records, but I don’t consider these part of my collection. I “collect” only White Albums.

Q: How did you come up with the idea of collecting first edition white albums? and why just first editions?

A: I got into collecting multiple White Albums because every copy tells a story. Each one has aged uniquely over the course of the last half-decade. The pressings from 1968 were numbered, implying that it is a limited edition, although one running in excess of 3 million.

 

 
Today, August 15, 2014, the show opens in England for the first time. Fittingly, the location is the birthplace of all four Beatles, Liverpool: “Presented by FACT and Liverpool International Music Festival, We Buy White Albums will take over FACT’s loading bay space on Wood Street from 15 August – 16 September.” On August 28, at 6pm, Chang will be on hand for a Q&A with FACT director Mike Stubbs.

The true subject of “We Buy White Albums,” it seems to me, is entropy, albeit entropy in the highly pressurized environment of the mass music marketplace. Issue more than three million albums with an almost completely white cover by the world’s favorite rock and roll band and see what happens. Things will happen to them, they will inevitably diverge from one another. The records will get scratched and warp, the covers will get water-damaged, the creamy, inviting white cover will become the home for doodles and graffiti. Chang revels in the strange forms the White Album can take, more than 45 years after its release. Anyone who’s spent any time plundering LP bargain bins can surely relate.

In that vein, Chang has also released a track in which 100 of his White Albums are played simultaneously (side 1 only, alas). The music starts off pretty much in sync; you can hear “Back in the USSR” just fine but the divergence soon sets in with a vengeance. As Allan Kozinn writes:
 

The albums, as it turns out, have also aged with some variety. Some played cleanly, others had scratches, noise from embedded dirt, or vinyl wear. And though the recordings are identical, variations in the pressings, and natural fluctuations in the speed of Mr. Chang’s analogue turntable, meant that the 100 recordings slowly moved out of sync, in the manner of an early Steve Reich piece: the opening of “Back in the U.S.S.R.” is entirely unified, but at the start of “Dear Prudence,” you hear the first line echoing several times, and by “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” the track is a nearly unrecognizeable roar.

 
For me, the high point—by far—is “Wild Honey Pie.” Enjoy.
 

 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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MoMA and Warhol Museum to digitize all of Warhol’s films and videos
08.15.2014
06:45 am

Topics:
Art
Movies

Tags:
Andy Warhol


 
Yesterday the Museum of Modern Art in New York and the Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh announced a joint project to digitize all of Andy Warhol’s film and video work, including his 60 feature-length movies and his 279 screen tests. The undertaking is projected to a “multi-year project.”

On October 15th, fifteen notable works that have never had public screenings will be presented in Pittsburgh.

According The Art Newspaper,
 

The epic project—there are around 1,000 rolls of films to capture frame by frame, and 4,000 videos—is made possible by the technical expertise and sponsorship of the special effects company MPC. The technology company Adstream will provide digital asset management. The partnership will be a “multi-year project”, according to MoMA’s press statement.

The artist’s films have been cared for by MoMA since the early 1990s, and are among the most requested works in its circulating film library. Fifteen of his films, which have never been screened in public before, have already been digitised by MPC. They are due to be shown in Pittsburgh on 17 October during “Exposed: Songs for Unseen Warhol Films”.

In a statement, Eric Shiner, the director of the Warhol Museum, said the artist’s films “are as significant as his paintings”, adding that the project will mean scholars and the public will be able to see his total output.

 
It’s not stated that the movies will be available online, but we can hope that that is implied. If so, it will be a chance for movies like Chelsea Girls, Bike Boys, Flesh, Lonesome Cowboys, Trash, Since, Blue Movie, Space, Empire, Sleep, Blow Job, and many others to find a new audience (or indeed, in some cases, their first audience).

Here’s a gander at Nico in a clip from I. A Man:
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Discussion
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The (almost) unknown art of Miles Davis
08.15.2014
06:32 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Miles Davis


 
 
Although his art would adorn one of his record releases from time to time, Miles Davis didn’t begin to draw and paint in earnest until he was in his mid-fifties, during the early 1980s and a period of musical inactivity. Miles being Miles, he didn’t merely dabble, but made creating art as much a part of his life as making music in his final decade. He was said to have worked obsessively each day on art when he wasn’t touring and he studied regularly with New York painter Jo Gelbard.

His style was a sharp, bold and masculine mixture of Kandinsky, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Picasso and African tribal art. I also find his work puts me in mind of the output of painter Phil Frost.

Davis’ paintings weren’t exhibited much during his lifetime, but since his death in 1991, his estate has mounted several traveling gallery and museum shows. Quincy Jones is known to own a number of Miles’ canvases.  In 2013, Miles Davis: The Collected Artwork was published.
 

 

“I’ve been painting and sketching all my life. Also, for my tailor I used to draw my suits, ‘cause he couldn’t speak English.”

 

 

“It’s like therapy for me, and keeps my mind occupied with something positive when I’m not playing music.”

 

 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Robin Williams immortalized in street art
08.14.2014
03:25 pm

Topics:
Art
R.I.P.

Tags:
Robin Williams


 
A nice Robin Williams tribute spotted in Belgrade, Serbia. The artist at this time is unknown. If you know who did this I will update the post.

Apparently Williams was in early stages of Parkinson’s disease according to his widow’s statement.

via ANIMAL

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Time to give prog rock’s artist-in-residence Roger Dean his due
08.13.2014
02:03 pm

Topics:
Art
Music

Tags:
prog
Roger Dean
progrock


Yes, Relayer, 1974
 
The art of Roger Dean is synonymous with prog rock, and for very good reason. Dean’s dreamy scapes and ethereal use of line and color are such an integral part of the genre, a Yes album cover has just as much cultural resonance as the music itself (and has arguably inspired many imitators). Born to an engineer father in the British Army and a mother who studied fashion design, Dean was primed from an early age not just towards aesthetics, but with a regard for space and balance of form. A childhood spent primarily abroad in Greece, Cyprus and Hong Kong may have cemented his love of the exotic vista.

Now, any ole’ blog could give you a listicle of awesome Yes album covers (and awesome they are), but we here at Dangerous Minds feel the lesser-known creations of Dean are just as fascinating. In art school, he actually studied industrial design, focusing on silver-smithing and furniture design—perhaps predicting his penchant for combining modern and ancient visuals. His professional career began with the sea urchin chair—a sort of bean bag chair with a brain that conformed to the sitter’s body (the way bean bag chars are actually supposed to, but never do).

Dean also designed the “retreat pod” featured in A Clockwork Orange and the distinctive seating for Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in 1968. That same year, he did his first album cover for a band called Gun, a promising piece that hints at his developing style. His first album cover for Yes was Fragile in 1971 and Dean designed the now-classic Yes “bubble” logo, which first appeared on the Close to the Edge cover. His name and reputation has been closely associated with Yes—and prog rock in general—ever since. Dean’s work has still remained diverse in genre however. He even specced out a green “Home for Life” living space that might as well be from one of his paintings.

The man himself is famous for saying, “I don’t really think of myself as a fantasy artist but as a landscape painter,” and it’s the principles of landscape drafting that make his work so fascinating. His anthology, Views is a fantastic collection of his work, and a beautiful study of a seminal artist.
 

Sea Urchin chair designed by Roger Dean, first produced in 1964
 

A Telegraph spread on Dean’s “retreat pod” chair, which was featured in Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange
 

Gun, Gun (1968), Dean’s first album cover
 

“Earth and Fire, Earth and Fire” (1970), very reminiscent of the windows in Dean’s later architecture
 

The original Virgin Records logo (also known as the “Gemini” or “Virgin Twins” logo) from 1972. A variation on this logo was used for the Virgin spin-off label Caroline Records.
 

Roger Dean’s “Green Castle,” early 70’s
 

“Freyja’s Castle,”  finished on daughter Freyja’s first birthday, 1987
 

Model of Dean’s “Home for Life”
 

Interior view of Dean’s “Home for Life”

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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HyperLip: Plastic prosthesis lips to give you that totally batshit crazy look!
08.13.2014
08:19 am

Topics:
Amusing
Art

Tags:
HyperLip


 
For some (obvious) reason the late Aussie fashionplate Leigh Bowery comes to mind when I see these images of people wearing French designer Sascha Nordmeyer‘s HyperLips.

According to Los Angeles-based Artecnica—who plan to put these grotesque puppies into mass production—“Conceived for people who are just looking for a bit of fun, the prosthesis is a rigid food-safe apparatus that forces a facial expression onto its wearer.”

Living in Los Angeles and with all the plastic surgery disasters I’m exposed to on a daily basis, I’ve seen plenty of people who look exactly like this without wearing anything.


 

 

 

 
Below, Conrad Veidt, playing a man whose mouth was mutilated into a hideous fixed grin, is unveiled at a freak show in this scene from 1928’s The Man Who Laughs

 
via DeZeen and Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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Marvel at these abandoned houses and cakes made of LEGO
08.11.2014
07:40 am

Topics:
Art

Tags:
LEGO
Mike Doyle

bblegohouseab.jpg
 
These amazing abandoned houses are the work of artist Mike Doyle.

Each building can reach up to six feet in height, use up to 130,000 LEGO bricks and take approximately 600 hours to produce. And while you may think it—there are no foreign objects of either wood, glue, paint or otherwise in these constructions. Incredible.
 
aalegohouseab.jpg
 
cclegohouseab.jpg
 
If you think that’s impressive, have a look at Mr. Doyle’s latest work that is almost good enough to eat.
 
legocake.jpg
 
See more of Mike Doyle’s work here.
 
Via Imgur & Nerdcore
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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Humans shellacked in junk food for monstrously sloppy portrait series
08.11.2014
05:37 am

Topics:
Art
Food

Tags:
photography
James Ostrer
junk food


 
James Ostrer’s “Wotsit All About” makes use of junk food in the most revolting of ways (even worse than actually eating it!) Models are adorned in hamburgers, cheese puffs, whipped cream and all manner of processed goodies, creating a sort of anthropological fashion spread of the crap we consume. There are full-body photographs of his tribesman, but it’s the faces that stand out, reminiscent of religious or ceremonial masks belonging to some long lost sugar clan.

Ostrer avoids what could have very well been a preachy lesson in healthy eating and instead approaches the modern world’s victual vices with a bit of humor. Like many of us, he dreams of a day when junk food is deemed subversive, saying, “Eventually I could see refined sugar being viewed in the same way as smoking is. The only difference is no one in fashion or film ever regarded being fat as cool.”

Some images may be NSFW, if your work holds an objection to breasts, which may or may not be unadorned in meringue.
 

 

 

 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Discussion
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Artist wears chicken flesh gimp suit
08.08.2014
08:58 am

Topics:
Animals
Art

Tags:
chicken suit


 
Because art. London-based artist Lewis Burton dressed-up in a handmade raw chicken skin suit—very Buffalo Bill-esque, ain’t it?—and walked around (or shall I say “posed around” or perhaps “freely ranged around”?) tourists on Trafalgar Square.

The documented results are then used to create viral material, stimulating the social sphere and allowing it to redefine itself by acting as a platform for dialogue as well as a source of contemporary consumer culture.

~ snip

The artist wanted to start a conversation about commodification with the chicken being an object which inhabits almost every walk of life, often grown in cages as a commodity. They have become a part of the fabric of everyday life.

There might be other ways to accomplish this, but I admire his… whatever it is. I just hope he has no open cuts or sores that might contract salmonella bacterium. Apparently, he also did this on a very hot day. Oh gawds.


 

 

 
via In Spring City and Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Discussion
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