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How to lie in 14 steps: the WikiHow guide to dishonesty
03.24.2017
08:33 am

Topics:
Current Events
Politics
Unorthodox

Tags:
Lying


 
Writing for Esquire in 1969, Gore Vidal laid bare a “demagogic strategy” William F. Buckley used to befuddle opponents:

If one is lying, accuse others of lying. On television this sort of thing is enormously effective in demoralizing the innocent and well-mannered who, acting in good faith, do not lie or make personal insults. Buckley has made many honorable men look dishonest fools by his demagoguery, and by the time they recover from his first assault and are ready to retaliate, the program is over.

Why is this effective? Because the thought of lying in public, where a judge, policeman or journalist might hear, gives good citizens the cold sweats. The mere accusation unleashes the bad conscience of the regular taxpayer and snaps his mind neatly in half. Did I fail to give a full and accurate account? Am I guilty of an act of omission, if not commission? Could I have used a more charitable adjective? Perhaps I did mischaracterize certain of my honorable friend’s views, etc.
 

 
We at Dangerous Minds don’t believe the strategies and tactics of dishonesty should be the preserve of the rich, the powerful, and the stupid, and few other “content providers” will tell you the score. While the New York Times may report on “How to Improve Your Productivity at Work,” the Gray Lady is unlikely to teach you how to play fast and loose with the facts. Less reputable outlets than ours will lie to you, which can be instructive, but they will do nothing deliberately to wise you up.

That’s why, until they start teaching us how to do our own surgeries, WikiHow’s lying clinic is likely to remain their most useful public service. 

I won’t list all of their 14 steps to falsehood, but here are some of the basics. Rehearsal is a key part of the technique. Repetition gives purchase to the most absurd, self-contradictory assertion. There are a few body language tips:

Be sure not to rub your face too much, sway back and forth, or shrug your shoulders a lot. Keep your arms down at your sides rather than folding them across your chest. Don’t blink more often than normal or turn your body away from the person. All of these are signs that you are lying.

(But what if you want people to believe you’re lying? It would be interesting to try all of these gestures at once while scrupulously telling the truth, as an experiment.)
 

 
Another pro tip from WikiHow: lie before you have to. Take the initiative. I think this means you run into the living room with icing in your nostrils and scream “I did not eat the cake that is not missing!”

The Community Q&A covers likely eventualities: “What if the person has found evidence?” “Is covering up your bad deed with a less significant bad deed a good strategy?” “If I need to, how do I force tears?”

This last question is misguided. Just tell the sucker you’re crying.

Posted by Oliver Hall | Leave a comment
The ‘degenerate art’ of Rudolf Schlichter


A surrealist-style painting by German artist, Rudolf Schlichter.
 
At the age of 26, while he had been pursuing his studies at the Art Academy of Kunstakademie in Karlsruhe, German artist Rudolf Schlichter was drafted into the army. Following a successful hunger strike, Schlichter was dismissed from his duties and returned to the bustling, forward-thinking town of Karlsruhe. Schlichter didn’t stick around for long and soon set off for Berlin where he fell in with the Dada scene and became a communist.

Schlichter made a successful living in Berlin from his illustrations. He transitioned from Dada to the “Neue Saclichkeit” movement (or “New Objectivity”) that used realism to express skepticism related to current events. He quickly became one of the most influential and critically important contributors to this quasi-Expressionism. Within New Objectivity there were two additional artistic courses: The “Verists” were known for using portraiture as a vehicle for their hostility toward authority figures, affluence and the oppression of society. The works of the great Otto Dix played a large role in this sub-component of New Objectivity. The other was commonly referred to as “Magic Realists” who were in opposition to the German style of Expressionism. Probably the most notable Magic Realism artist was Georg Schrimpf whose work was a crucial part of New Objectivity. Now that we’ve got your mini subversive art lesson out of the way, here’s a bit more on Rudolf Schlichter whose work, though not initially, was reviled by the Nazis.

While Schlichter’s body of work is as vast as it is diverse, there were many recurrent points of interest and themes, especially erotic ones, in his paintings and illustrations. Often his subjects were comprised of various bohemian movers and shakers and other residents who were part of the vibrant counterculture of the streets of Berlin where he spent much of his time. In 1923 Schlichter provided 60 illustrations for an edition of Oscar Wilde’s The Ballad of Reading Gaol. At the end of the 1920s, Schlichter returned to being a practicing Catholic and would end up doing illustrations for various religious publications put out by the church including a youth-oriented magazine called Jungle Front. The illustrations in the magazine often cast a disparaging light on the politics of Adolf Hitler. Coincidently at the time of its publication, Schlichter also belonged to the exclusively German art organization run by the Third Reich, “Reichskammer der bildenden Künste” or the “Reich Chamber of Fine Arts” headed up by propagandist extraordinaire Joseph Goebbels. And as you might imagine the jab didn’t go unnoticed and Schlichter was promptly ousted. His work was removed from galleries and destroyed and Schlichter’s name was added to the “degenerate art” list kept by the Nazis. Which in my mind is always the right kind of list to be on, in any time period.

Though he would pass away at the age of 65, a little more than a decade prior to his death Schlichter produced many remarkable pieces of surrealistic style paintings. Which would lead to the artist being dubbed “the German Salvador Dali.” I’ve included a few of Schlichter’s surrealist works as well as a nice sampling of his erotica below. Which means much of what follows is NSFW.
 

 

“Blonde Enemy” 1922.
 

“Dada Roof Studio.”
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Modern Life Sucks: Satirical illustrations of our brave new world

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We’re all owned. We’re bought, bartered, liked, sold, conned, shared and used everyday to make other people money. We’re all well and truly fucked. Welcome to the world of Luis Quiles.

Luis Quiles, aka Gunsmithcat, is a Spanish artist whose corrsucating satirical ilustrations take no prisoners. No one is safe. The right. The left. The good. The bad. Quiles takes them all down. He specifically targets the dehumanizing nature of capitalism, terrorism, and religion. His work is highly controversial. It’s been deemed offensive. But we shouldn’t be offended by Luis’s drawings rather we should be offended at the hard reality he depicts.
 
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See more of Luis Quiles’ work, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
‘Mr. Dictator Head’: Ruthless political despots reimagined ala ‘Mr. Potato Head’


A plastic sculpture of Kim Jong-il from artist Stephen Ives’ series ‘Mr. Dictator Head.’
 

Belief has to be suspended to enter the worlds I create. When the audience no longer sees the puppets strings they will then believe the puppet is real.

—artist Stephen Ives

 
The sculptures in this post are a part of a series by Melbourne-based artist Stephen Ives called “Mr. Dictator Head.”

For the 2010 series, Ives’ created rather hauntingly accurate Mr. Potato Head sculptures in the image of various historical tyrants such as Saddam Hussein, Hitler, Lenin,  even Margaret Thatcher. In the spirit of the original toy (and to make a point about the interchangabilty of tyrants, no doubt) Ives even reused various facial aspects of each dictator to create a new one—so to create his potato head Hussein he combined Mao Zedong’s plastic cheeks, the eyes used to make potato head Hitler and the lips of the “Butcher of Uganda” Idi Amin. Ives’ sculptures are amusing but they most definitely give off an equally sinister vibe. Especially when you consider the real-life track records of each.
 

Idi Amin.
 

Margaret Thatcher.
 

Vladimir Lenin.
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Someone made a claymation of the alleged ‘Donald Trump Pee Tape’
03.20.2017
08:14 am

Topics:
Amusing
Politics

Tags:
Donald Trump


 
Some would say that all art is political.

Living through historically “interesting times” (in the sense of the famous Chinese curse) has long been seen to have an effect on the arts and culture. For the 2017 Whitney Biennial, which opens today, artist Jordan Wolfson has made a violent minute-and-a-half video that must be experienced with a virtual reality headset. In the piece, the artist brutally beats a man with a baseball bat and then kicks him in the face. Repeatedly.

I’ve only read a description of the work, but it seems totally on point for Spring 2017, doesn’t it?

This was sent to us this morning by “Freaks on Harrison.” As of 8:03 AM the video, which was posted just 15 hours ago—has had fewer than 70 views. I expect that’ll change soon enough.

Make of it what you will. Terribly, terribly NSFW stuff.

Enjoy?
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Make America Misogynistic Again: Artist puts actual Trump quotes on vintage sexist magazine ads
03.13.2017
03:00 pm

Topics:
Politics

Tags:
Donald Trump
sexism


 
There’s really not much to say here. The images speak for themselves. The artist who made these simply goes by “Saint Hoax.”

I removed the original headlines from these misogynistic advertisements and replaced them with quotes that Donald Trump said about women.

The headlines and visuals strongly complement each other, although there’s almost a 30-year gap between them.

You can visit Saint Hoax’s site to see more “politically incorrect” art.


 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
‘21st century bastard’: Asshole action figures for the ‘darkest timeline’


“Evil” Steve Bannon
 
One theme of 2016-2017 is that we’re all hearing waaaay too much about Sean Spicer, Vladimir Putin, and Nigel Farange. Prominent coverage in the media of scumbags such as these is one of the surest signs that we’ve fallen into the “darkest timeline,” to quote Dan Harmon’s show Community. In a normal world Spicer and Farange would be non-entities and Putin would be widely regarded as a desperate loser clinging to his prerogatives rather than a Machiavellian mastermind.

Obviously, Donald Trump would either be in bankruptcy court or perhaps angling for something to rejuvenate his reality TV career.

But alas, that is not the way the 21st century is working out, is it? In this timeline Brexit happened, Trump won the election, and Putin apparently has dozens of toadies sprinkled throughout the White House staff. Here to pay tribute to the awfulness that is “everything you see in the paper every fucking day” are some wonderful mockups of fake action figures of many of the worst people in international politics today, including the three people already mentioned plus Richard Spencer and his highly punchable Nazi face, “Evil” Steve Bannon, “Slimy” Piers Morgan, and a few others.

All of them are OG “bad dudes”—to quote President Trump, who is mysteriously absent here—and come with “adjustable limbs and morals”! These were created by Chris the Barker, who is a practitioner of “fake toys” such as those pictured here. You can also follow his Tumblr.

Included in the set is “Thatcher’s Ghost,” whose chilly spirit has somehow affected everything political in the Anglo-American sphere of late. There are lots of clever jokes and references in the images but I’ll leave those for you to detect.
 

“Action Vlad”-imir Putin
 

“Alt-Right Punchbag” Richard Spencer
 

“Good Ol’ Kellyanne” Conway
 
More action figure assholes after the jump….....

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Stirring images of two decades of political protest in New York City
02.28.2017
09:56 am

Topics:
Activism
Politics

Tags:
New York City
protest


Pro-Sandinista rally, Fifth Avenue, Manhattan, June 1979
Photographer: David Gonzalez

Clearly the election of Donald Trump has revived interest in mass protest among the rank and file of the Democratic Party and its left-leaning allies, and it may seem to some as if we’re in the midst of a “revival” of truly vital protesting after decades of apparent hibernation. One might even conclude that the 1980s and 1990s will go down in history as a quiescent era of reaction and conformity.

Don’t believe it.

In recent decades, protests have never not been a thing—in the nation’s largest city, New York, there hasn’t ever been a year that wasn’t marked by significant protests over topics like abortion, AIDS, housing, police brutality, foreign affairs, queer rights, animal rights, and anti-war demonstrations.

In the more recent political era, there has been a notion that successful protests are always peaceful protests, but “Whose Streets? Our Streets! New York City: 1980–2000,” the remarkable exhibition currently at the Bronx Documentary Center (614 Courtlandt Avenue) gives the lie to that claim as well. The powers that be, including the police, aren’t always willing to permit righteous protest to take place in a peaceful manner, and sometimes blood is shed, automobiles are overturned, and large objects are set on fire.

The show ends on March 5, so if you’re in the vicinity, make sure to get out and check it out before it closes.

(Also, take part in any protests in your area that conform to your particular views!)
 

Nuclear Freeze Rally, Central Park, Manhattan, June 1982
Photographer: Richard Sandler

 

Memorial to AIDS victims, Central Park, Manhattan, June 1983
Photographer: Alon Reininger

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Witches plan mass hexing of Donald Trump tomorrow night outside Trump Tower


 
The so-called Wiccan “Rule of Three” (also called the “Three-fold Law” or “Law of Return”) is a moral code held by many witches. Karma is another word that (more or less) covers the same general territory. The energy that you “put out there”—whether good or ill—will return to you three times stronger. It’s not something that’s really a dogma among Pagans, but more of an admonition, or warning to neophytes, that there is a reward—or punishment—in harmony with the magic you work and the intent behind it.

Spit in the wind and it comes back to hit you in the face. What goes around, comes around. Treat others as you would like to be treated and someone is less likely to turn punching your fucking Nazi face into a popular meme.

Tomorrow night, February 24th, starting at one minute to midnight and going on for six minutes until 12:05 AM, a group of witches will perform a binding spell on Donald Trump and those who enable him outside of Trump Tower, or wherever they happen to be:

Join the largest mass binding spell in history as participants around the world, individually and in groups, focus their consciousness to prevent Donald Trump from doing harm.

 

 
An unflattering picture of the babbling orange idiot who knows the nuclear codes and a candle are all it takes to participate. The event’s Facebook page is here. If you can’t be at Trump Tower at the appointed time, face east and let ‘er rip… Some helpful instructions can be found here. Facebook event page here.

Fuck it. Sometimes you just have to exorcise the Pentagon, folks…
 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Mutants and Grotesque Monsters: The Soviet Artist who rebelled against the fall of Communism
02.22.2017
11:27 am

Topics:
Art
Politics

Tags:
Marxism
USSR
communism
Geliy Korzhev

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‘The Butcher’ (1990).
 
Not every Russian citizen was pleased to see the end of Communism in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics during the 1980s and 1990s. Some, like the artist Geliy Korzhev (1925-2012) thought the changes wrought by perestoika were a betrayal of all the lives sacrificed in order to bring true equality to the Russian people. Korzhev thought the great socialist revolution had hardly started before it was being betrayed and abandoned by the politicians who had lived so well from it, while others had paid the price.

Korzhev was a hardline Communist who never gave up his political beliefs. In the 1980s, he began painting grotesque and surreal paintings of this new world of Russian capitalism he and his fellow Soviets were being forced to embrace.

Geliy Mikhailovich Korzhev-Chuvelev studied at Moscow State Art School from 1939-44, where he excelled at drawing and painting and went on to become one of the greatest artists of the approved style of Socialist Realism. According to the Museum of Russian Art:

[Korzhev] is recognized by contemporary Russian art historians as one of the most influential painters of the second half of the 20th century; his work has influenced the style and subjects of two generations of post-WWII Russian artists.

Korzhev’s painting developed from the basic propagandist needs of Socialist Realism into a more personal and highly artistic style. His work ranged from the traditional Soviet style to a more Impressionistic studies. Then in later life he progressed towards a highly surreal and almost Bosch-like approach with a series of allegorical works. These attacked the political corruption and folly of the new Russia. They depicted weird parasitic creatures devouring the flesh of citizens and bizarre monsters celebrating their worst excesses. His paintings were disturbing, thought-provoking and radical in their revolt against the new capitalist politics of the time.

Korzhev made his first mutant paintings in the 1970s when he felt the Soviet leaders were ceding their belief in Communism. This was confirmed with the arrival of Mikhail Gorbachev the great reformer who started the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Throughout the eighties, Korzhev worked in “silent opposition to the new Russian leadership.”

Unwavering in his views, in the late 1990s the artist refused a state award bestowed upon him by the government of the new Russian Federation.

In a note explaining his decision, Korzhev wrote of his motives:

“I was born in the Soviet Union and sincerely believed in the ideas and ideals of the time. Today, they are considered a historical mistake. Now Russia has a social system directly opposite to the one under which I, as an artist, was brought up. The acceptance of a state award would be equal to a confession of my hypocrisy throughout my artistic career. I request that you consider my refusal with due understanding.”

It is said that Korzhev “did not seek to openly criticize the political or social system of contemporary Russia” but from his paintings during this time it is difficult not to see how the political loss of faith in the Soviet state did not affect his work.

In 2001, he said:

“For those who are running the country I have, as Saint-Exupery put it, a deep dislike. Those circles that are currently flourishing and are now at the forefront hold no interest for me. As an artist, I see absolutely no point in studying that part of society. The people who do not fit into this pattern, however - now they are of interest. The ‘superfluous’ men, the outsiders - today, they are many. Rejected, ejected from normal life, unwanted in the current climate… I am interested in their fate, in their inner struggle. As far as I am concerned, they are the real, worthy heroes for the artist.”

Among his last works were a hammer and sickle and portraits of the new Russian Adam and Eva.
 
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‘Real’ (1998).
 
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‘The Butcher #1’ (1990).
 
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‘Mutants’ (1973).
 
More of Korzhev’s weird paintings, after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
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