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Swoon Magazine: LA/NY Fashion Underground (Now Shipping!)
08.14.2009
03:13 pm
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Bump… Swoon Magazine, the awesome Los Angeles / New York underground fashion mag that I covered previously on Dangerous Minds is now shipping.

This issue features on the current Los Angeles and New York music scenes (and this stuff is actually GOOD. I hate most music and especially indie crap but editor Kelly McKay is an adept at finding and publicizing Truly New and Exciting and Interesting bands that people haven’t heard of and really should. This stuff WILL expand your cultural knowledge base about 17 chess moves past the party line.)

Bands featured in this issue:

From LA: We Are The World, Weave, Rainbow Arabia, Marfa and Ne-af, Fancy Space People, Hard Place, Hecuba, Jer Ber Jones.

From NYC: Preacher and the Knife, Bellmer Dolls, Lights, New York Night Train, Golden Triangle, Patrick Cleandenim, Rebecca Cherry, The Nasties, Electric Tickle Machine, The Beets, Light Asylum, Miles Benjamin Anthony Robinson, White Diamonds, Class Actress, Bunny Rabbit.

Get yours here before they’re gone!

Posted by Jason Louv
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08.14.2009
03:13 pm
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The Bear Rug Fuhrer
08.14.2009
03:04 pm
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A sampling of work here from Israeli artist, Boaz Arad.   According to Arad, the above rug represents (for better or worse), what a Nazi hunter might do if he/she were able to capture the ultimate prize.  The video below Cuisinarts a number of speeches to the point where Hitler’s forced to say, in Hebrew no less, “Greetings, Jerusalem.  I am deeply sorry.”

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
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08.14.2009
03:04 pm
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Burning Ground Boogaloo!
08.14.2009
02:24 pm
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I hacked this video together a while back by using a classic Disney cartoon remixed with a new backing track, “Princess Margaret’s Man in the Djamalfna” by Coil from the album “The New Backwards.” This kind of perfectly encapsulates one of my mini world-views. As Brion Gysin said… we’re all just Here to Go!

Posted by Jason Louv
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08.14.2009
02:24 pm
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Catching Up With Moroder
08.14.2009
01:21 pm
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Childhood movie-going usually falls into two categories: Movies you want to see and do, and movies you REALLY want to see but are forbidden to.  Along with Equus and The Exorcist, Alan Parker‘s Midnight Express, for me, fell into that later category.  Drugs, Turkish prisons, male-on-male rape?  No way was I gonna talk my preteen self into that one.  That isn’t to say, though, that I couldn’t get my hands on the Giorgio Moroder soundtrack—something I played obsessively, and still hear faintly whenever I’m (not infrequently) trying to jump a wall. 

Moroder went on, of course, to even greater fame with Blondie, Donna Summer, even Japan.  The 70s synth icon turns 70 (!) next Spring, and still lives in Italy, where he scored most recently of all things the soundtrack to Leni Riefenstahl‘s last film, the marine documentary, Impressionen Unter Wasser.  You can find an excellent assortment of Moroder-related videos, here.  Or simply play the below video a few times and find a wall or two.

 

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
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08.14.2009
01:21 pm
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I am a (Mexican) Coke Fiend
08.14.2009
02:08 am
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Okay, I’ll admit it… I’ve got a new vice and it’s a little on the embarrassing side. You see, I’ve turned into a real Coke fiend. Not cocaine, oh no, I went through that phase years ago, I mean THE REAL THING... Mexican Coca-Cola! That’s right kids, Mexican Coke is different from (most) domestic variants of the world’s most popular soft drink. In Mexican they use real sugar cane—none of this high fructose corn syrup shit south of the border—and it is SO FREAKING DELICIOUS.

Mind you, I say this as someone who has NEVER liked soda and never drank it at all (I could go years without drinking a single carbonated beverage, it’s true), but man I just cannot get enough this this stuff. It happened one day when a friend was visiting. We walked around the corner to the local bodega and my friend noticed that they had the classic glass Coke bottles with the stickers on them—“YES!”—he cried out “They’ve got Mexican Coke here!”  We bought two, drank them, then went straight back and bought two more. That was a year ago and now I drink them all the time (so does my wife, another lifelong soda hater, now similarly addicted to the “Mexican brown”—as we Mexican Coke fiends call our favorite tipple).

I’ve got it easy, after all I live in Los Angeles where Mexican Coke is plentiful and cheap. Here’s some info from the A Continuous Lean blog about where you can “score” some Mexican Coke in your locale:

How do you get your hands on some of this tasty Mexican Coke? If you live in New York there are a few options. Bodegas in places like Sunset Park, Washington Heights, etc. often stock Mexican Coca-Cola as well as other versions of Coke from South American countries. The beverage store New-Beer on the Lower East Side will occasionally sell the real-deal sugar cane Coke. If you live in Texas, Arizona, New Mexico or California Costco sells Mexican Coke by the case. I have my friend Kate from Texas bring me four bottles at a time. Hope she doesn?

Posted by Richard Metzger
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08.14.2009
02:08 am
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The First Synthesizer Was Built in 1938
08.13.2009
07:28 pm
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Phil Cirocco is fascinated by vintage analog synthesizers and cheesy soundtracks from vintage sci-fi films. His website, the Novachord Restoration Project details how he lovingly refurbished a 1938 polyphonic synthesizer from Hammond:

The first commercially available synthesizer was designed by the Hammond Organ Company in 1938 and put into full production from 1938 to 1942. The Novachord is a gargantuan, all tube, 72 note polyphonic synthesizer with oscillators, filters, VCAs, envelope generators and even frequency dividers.

I bought my Hammond Novachord around 10/2004 in Connecticut. After chatting with the few brave souls who tried to repair these beasts, I soon realized that replacement of all the passive components was necessary for reliable and stable operation of any Novachord. However, the sheer number of components and it’s complexity, make properly restoring a Novachord a Herculean task.

I’ll say! Here’s the finished product:

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As seen on Jeremey Dyson’s Twitter feed (he’s the off-screen member of The League of Gentlemen)

Posted by Richard Metzger
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08.13.2009
07:28 pm
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Sharon Tate’s Don’t Make Waves
08.13.2009
04:03 pm
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Yes, Woodstock, but last week also saw the 40th anniversary of LA’s darkest campfire tale.  You probably know the story by now (and if you don’t, you can read about it here, or here), but the shorthand goes like this…

On the night of August 8, 1969, Charles Manson disciples Susan Atkins, Charles “Tex” Watson, Patricia Krenwinkel and Linda Kasabian stormed the rented home of Roman Polanski on 10050 Cielo Drive.  Once behind its gates, they brutally and systematically took the lives of 5 people—including the life of Polanski’s eight-and-a-half months pregnant girlfriend, actress Sharon Tate.  Tate was the last to die, knived by Watson while she was pinned down by Atkins, who then took some of Tate’s blood and used it to scrawl “PIG” on the porch wall.  Manson had ordered her to leave behind a sign, “something witchy.”

The tragic events of that night, spilled into the following night and continued to ripple out through the decade(s) to come.  Even today, the events of August ‘69 provided Pynchon with the darkly seismic backdrop to his new novel, Inherent Vice.  The fallout was felt everywhere—even I had nightmares.  Not about the events themselves (I was too young to remember those), but about Manson someday going free, and moving down the block

After losing his wife and unborn child, Polanski was understandably devastated, and his life, eight years later, would go on to take another troubled turn.  And Sharon Tate’s legacy?  Beyond a still-loyal fanbase, all she left behind is a smattering of films and the promise of what might have been.  And that promise, in my eyes, is at its most tangible in Tate’s American debut, Don’t Make Waves
 
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What’s it all about?  Not much beyond The Byrds’ winning title track and Tony Curtis’ “Carlo Cofield” moving to Malibu and mixing it up with the town’s free-lovin’ oddballs.  It was directed by Brit Alexander Mackendrick, a decade past his Sweet Smell of Success, and features one of my all-time favorite character actors, the criminally underappreciated Robert Webber.  Curtis and Webber aside, though, it’s Tate who steals the show as the always-bikinied skydiver, “Malibu.”  In fact, Tate made such a strong impression, she served as the inspiration for Mattel’s “Malibu Barbie.”
 
A physical copy of Waves is hard to come by.  But you can still catch it for yourself, in its 10-part entirety, on YouTube.  Part 1 starts right here.  The trailer follows below.

 
In The LA Times: Restoring Sharon Tate

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
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08.13.2009
04:03 pm
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Snuff Box: Best Sketch Comedy Show You’ve Never Heard Of
08.13.2009
01:26 pm
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Snuff Box is the name of the greatest sketch comedy show you’ve never heard of. I’d venture so far as to say it’s a work of demented genius. Make that two demented geniuses, Matt Berry (IT Crowd, Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace) and Rich Fulcher (“Bob Fossil,” “Eleanor,” etc., on The Mighty Boosh). First broadcast at 11pm on BBC3 in 2006 and never broadcast again, Snuff Box sadly was missed by its target audience, who ended up discovering it anyway, via YouTube and Bit Torrent. (Snuff Box finally came out on DVD in 2008).

Each episode begins with Berry and Fulcher (playing “themselves”) walking down a white hallway, before choosing a door leading to a typically odd “situation.” The pair are employed as government hangmen. They also spend a lot of time in a gentleman’s club (where time travel occurs), nursing whiskeys and swearing. There is a LOT of swearing in Snuff Box, so much so that it gives Deadwood a run for the money. It’s one of the meanest spirited comedies I can think of (not that this is a bad thing, of course).

Here are some of my favorite Snuff Box moments. First, the awkward date:


The Empty Room


The Guitar Lesson


Isn’t it about time Adult Swim picked this sucker up for American audiences??? (Hint, hint).

Matt and Rich Kill Elton John

Mac vs PC

The Swearing Song

Berry and Fulcher interview

Mustard magazine: Berry and Fulcher interview

Posted by Richard Metzger
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08.13.2009
01:26 pm
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Peace Pilgrim: 25,000 Miles on Foot for Peace!
08.12.2009
10:24 pm
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Recently came across a book of collected interviews with Peace Pilgrim. Born Mildred Norman in 1908, Peace Pilgrim began to walk across the United States in 1953, with only one set of clothes, no money, would not accept money, and would only eat what food people gave her. She continued her pilgrimage for 28 years, until her death in 1981. Her pilgrimage, of course, was for world peace.

Now that is some sheer fuck-you audacity. That’s what we call a, cough, “inspiring example of how much one person can do with their life by making it an inspiring example.”

You can find lots of her writing here. It’s concise and very direct.

 

Posted by Jason Louv
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08.12.2009
10:24 pm
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Leary And Cleaver In Algeria
08.12.2009
06:48 pm
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After reading Ginia Bellafante‘s NYT review of Lords of The Revolution (last mentioned in these pages here), I’m now even less inclined to spend my 5 hours on the VH1 special.  That being said, Bellafante does single out for praise the installments profiling Timothy Leary and The Black Panthers.  Despite their generational link, though, Leary and the Panthers didn’t always see eye-to-eye. 

After escaping from prison in 1970, Leary found refuge in Algeria with the Panthers’ Eldridge Cleaver, who was himself on the lam for attempted murder.  But rather than receiving Leary as a kindred spirit—and displeased with his drug-touting ways—Eldridge kidnapped Tim and his wife, Rosemary Woodruff…er, placed them under “revolutionary arrest.”  Eldridge eventually freed the pair, but, in the clip above, you can still get a sense of their uneasy Algerian alliance.

 

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
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08.12.2009
06:48 pm
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