FOLLOW US ON: follow us in feedly
GET THE NEWSLETTER
CONTACT US
The Secret Art: Radionics Book by Duncan Laurie
09.14.2009
08:17 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image

 

Dangerous Minds pal Duncan Laurie’s new book The Secret Art: A Brief History of Radionic Technology for the Creative Individual has just been published by Anomalist Books and is for sale at Amazon.

Duncan Laurie is one of the world’s foremost experts on the “forbidden science” of radionics. Some of you may recall Duncan from the Disinformation TV show. He’s the genteel mad scientist/artist from Jamestown, Rhode Island who looks like Harrison Ford and who works in laboratory housed in a glass building. In 2000 I recorded an interview with Duncan where he demonstrated the subtle energy exchange between plants and his mind-blowing collection of radionics devices. Fascinating stuff. He’s an amazing person with an amazing mind. Besides being an artist, Duncan designs all manner of radionic devices himself, such as radionic socks that make wishes come true—you walk around on the radionic circuitry printed on the socks—and a Purr Generator that utilizes the healing properties of a cat’s purr and amplifies these healing properties electronically to help people relax and lower blood pressure. I read an earlier draft of this book about five years ago and it was thrilling to read about Duncan’s unorthodox discoveries then and I eagerly await reading The Secret Art.

What is The Secret Art? The history of radionics is the story of how various inventors designed devices that employ directed intent to affect the real world. With these tools, they promoted healing without pills or surgery, grew crops without fertilizer, restrained insect predation without pesticides, and performed a host of other seemingly impossible feats that defy mechanistic science. The Secret Art traces this astonishing process beginning with early art designs suggestive of radionic intent. For many prehistoric and indigenous peoples, art was also a means of interacting with Nature to enhance healing, increase crop yields, and enable visionary experiences. Coincidentally, radionic inventors discovered by trial and error that even drawings and bizarre technology could function radionically. This discovery followed a long process of design innovation that started with mechanical devices, proceeded through a generation of electronic instruments, and most recently has been applied to computer and software technology. Conceivably, the theory and techniques outlined in this book could provide artists with a revolutionary approach to the creative process that is at once both new and timeless. A potential exists today for radionic ideas to empower creative individuals to develop skills in working with Nature that achieve profound real world results.

 

image

 

Duncan Laurie website

Via Steve Nalepa

 

Posted by Richard Metzger
|
09.14.2009
08:17 pm
|
The Woman Who ?
09.14.2009
01:48 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image

 

Synesthesia is a neurological phenomenon, or condition, where neural pathways are confounded and confused. For instance, sounds or music may be experienced as something visual or the reverse, sights might trigger certain sounds in a synesthetes’ mind. There are many different modes of how this phenomenon can manifest itself. Here’s an interesting example, Edinburgh University psychologist Holly Branigan who can visualize time:

“For me it?

Posted by Richard Metzger
|
09.14.2009
01:48 pm
|
The Cosmonaut of the Erotic Future
09.10.2009
06:34 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image

Excellent essay from Cabinet Magazine, by Aaron Schuster.

What happens to levitation, one of the great imaginative figures of art and literature, in the transition from a religious culture to the disenchanted universe of modern science? What becomes of ecstasy, rapture, ascension, transcendence, grace wh?Ǭ?e?Ǭ?n these give way to “space oddity”: man enclosed in a tin can floating far above the world? Is the cosmonaut a prophet of the erotic future, avatar of man?

Posted by Jason Louv
|
09.10.2009
06:34 pm
|
Meet The Self-Lighting Cigarette (1972)
09.05.2009
12:20 am
Topics:
Tags:


South Korean inventor Whang Kyu-bong invents the self-lighting cigarette.

United States Patent 3,955,937

Posted by Tara McGinley
|
09.05.2009
12:20 am
|
Testing The Spontaneous Human Combustion Beam
09.03.2009
01:50 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image
 
More news from the “death from above” front: Boeing just announced the successful testing of their Advanced Tactical Laser (ATL).  Not familiar with the ATL?  Well, according to Wired‘s David Hambling here’s what it can do:

The Advanced Tactical Laser, weighing twelve thousand pounds and mounted in a Hercules transport plane, is intended to give Special Forces Command ‘ultra-precision strike capability’ against a wide range of ground targets.  Its power is somewhere in the hundred-kilowatt range.  According to the developers, the accuracy of this weapon is little short of supernatural.  They claim that the pinpoint precision can make it lethal or non-lethal at will.  For example, they say it can either destroy a vehicle completely, or just damage the tires to immobilize it.

But that’s not even close to what’s got the military so hot and bothered about this baby’s capabilities.  Hambling asserts that Boeing’s ATL “will allow Special Forces to strike with maximum precision, from long distances—without being blamed for the attacks.  ‘Plausible deniability’ is how the presentation put it.”

Or, in simpler terms, the ATL can carry out covert assassinations with zero accountability.  Cause of death, forensically speaking?  Struck by lightning.

From The Register: Secret U.S. Spontaneous Human Combustion Beam Tested

In Wired: Laser Gunship Fires; “Deniable” Strikes Ahead?

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
|
09.03.2009
01:50 pm
|
The Truth About Lying
09.02.2009
03:24 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image
 
The current Forbes offers up some interesting theories as to why men and women lie—especially when it comes to that hall-of-mirrors world of online dating.  With apologies to Jane, it’s a truth universally acknowledged that a single man will lie about his height and salary, while a single woman will often lie about their age.  But why?  Well, according to Dennis Reina, author of Trust & Betrayal in the Workplace, men, culturally, are more concerned with their professional status, women their social status.

The playing field’s pretty even (now) when it comes to issues of extramarital affairs and money.  Regarding the later, though, men tend to lie about, “bad investments or financial decisions, while women (even if they make as much or more money than the man) will misrepresent their buying habits.”

But there’s also, perhaps, in play here a biological component.  Regarding women who alter their appearance with push-up bras and Botox, Mark Frank, a communications professor at the University of Buffalo, suggests, “these small deceptions might be necessary for procreation and social survival.  A tiger has stripes that coat its back and blend it into the high grass.  It doesn’t wake up one day and say, ‘Shall I put on spots?’” 

Hmm…comparing “deceptive women” to tigers.  Hey, Dr. Frank: maybe there’s a psychology professor down the hall?

In Forbes: He Lied, She Lied

Bonus: The Knickerbockers’ Lies

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
|
09.02.2009
03:24 pm
|
Lancia Stratos Zero (1970)
09.01.2009
02:08 am
Topics:
Tags:

image

 

Lotus Esprit Turbo says, “The Lancia Stratos HF prototype was a styling exercise by Bertone, first show at the Turin Motor show in October 1970. It was a futuristic design with a wedge shaped profile and stood just 33 inches (84 cm) from the ground. It was so low, that conventional doors where not used. Instead, drivers had to flip up the windscreen and walk into the car, to gained entry. Visibility was restricted as the front windscreen was narrow, when inside. The car had a 1.6 litre V4 engine, taken from the Fulvia HF. To access the mid-mounted engine, a triangular shaped panel hinged upwards.”

image

 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley
|
09.01.2009
02:08 am
|
Robot Listens and Responds to Human Drummer
08.28.2009
11:50 am
Topics:
Tags:


“A robot listens and responds to a human drummer, improvising new rhythms. From Georgia Tech’s Gil Weinberg and Scott Driscoll.”


Haile, the interactive robot drummer

Posted by Tara McGinley
|
08.28.2009
11:50 am
|
The Long-Range Taser Controversy
08.27.2009
11:55 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image
 
Meet the long-range taser.  For when stunning your victims at close-range just won’t do.  As the accompanying promotional video testifies, the long-range delivers “true incapacitation” without wires, and from a “ground-breaking distance” of a 100 feet away.  Sweet!  But don’t expect to see your neighbor firing one at your dog—or you—anytime soon.  According to a recent article in New Science:

A team led by Cynthia Bir, a trauma injury specialist at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan, found that some of the 275 XREP cartridges that Taser supplied for testing last year were capable of delivering an electric shock for more than 5 minutes, rather than the 20 seconds of shocking current they are supposed to generate.

Electric shock weapon expert (!) Steve Wright finds this particularly worrisome, “what happens when the weapons are fired at pregnant women, people with health problems or the very young?”  I’m with you, Steve.  Pregnant women, people with health problems and the very young should receive shocks of only 20 seconds or so—in the name of all that’s humane.

 
In New Scientist: Long-Range Taser Reignites Safety Debate

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
|
08.27.2009
11:55 pm
|
Depression’s Evolutionary Roots
08.26.2009
08:03 pm
Topics:
Tags:

image
 
Fascinating article in Scientific American that possibly answers why depression still plagues roughly 30-50% of all people, everywhere.  Since the brain plays such an essential role in promoting survival and reproduction, and depression can debilitate so thoroughly, why hasn’t mankind simply evolved beyond it?

Well, according to Doctors Paul W. Andrews and J. Anderson Thomson, Jr., maybe it’s time we start considering depression a “useful” disorder.  One which is, “in fact, an adaptation, a state of mind which brings real costs, but also brings real benefits.”  The pair backs this up with some brain-confusing brain chemistry, then moves on to make some simpler sense:

This is not to say that depression is not a problem.  Depressed people often have trouble performing everyday activities, they can?

Posted by Bradley Novicoff
|
08.26.2009
08:03 pm
|
Page 72 of 74 ‹ First  < 70 71 72 73 74 >