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Rich Fulcher on last night’s ‘Late, Late Show’ with Craig Ferguson
01.20.2011
11:51 am

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They hate us for our freedom

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Dangerous Minds pal Rich Fulcher gets serious with Craig Ferguson last night. Rich will be my guest on the DM talkshow taping this weekend.

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Jester Wools: For Gayer Garments
01.20.2011
10:28 am

Topics:
Fashion
History
Queer

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Festive 1940s advertisement for Jester Wools.

(via Chateau Thombeau)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Haunted Retro Part 2: Nite Jewel, Desire & Italians Do It Better
01.20.2011
08:29 am

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In the last article I set-up the parameters of what I have coined the “Haunted Retro” sound, and looked at Ariel Pink and his friends John Maus and Gary War. But that was all very phallocentric really, so this time I am covering the female-led bands in this imaginary “scene”.

Nite Jewel

Well, it’s not so imaginary, as a lot of these artists have worked together and definitely share some aesthetic and musical qualities. For instance L.A.‘s Nite Jewel have worked with John Maus and Haunted Graffiti member Cole MGN in the past. It’s not hard to see or hear why. They both record to 8 track tape using analogue and classic FM synths (like Roland Junos) and both have a slightly surreal, daydreamy vibe. But while Maus could very roughly be described as “synth-pop”, Nite Jewel make something that is more like “white-girl-soul”. They have recorded a cover of MOR-period Roxy Music and have a definite Fleetwood Mac-on-more-downers vibe. Being largely the work of one woman (Ramona Gonzales) Nite Jewel recently released the Am I Real? EP on the American Gloriette label, whose lead track “We Want Our Things” is a good snapshot of their sound.

Nite Jewel “We Want Our Things”
 

 
Nite Jewel “What Did He Say”
 

 
Nite Jewel “Want You Back”
 

 

Desire & Italians Do It Better after the jump…

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Leave a comment
It’s 1978 and Blondie has invaded Japan like a punk rock Godzilla
01.20.2011
01:37 am

Topics:
Pop Culture
Punk

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Post modern bubble gum. Blondie on Japanese teen show Popteens in January 1978.

Way before they scored a hit in the States, Blondie were huge in Japan. They were the rock and roll version of Andy Warhol’s Campbell soup can, a distillation in one indelible image of something so American yet so universal. Pop!
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
“Dub Revolution ina China”: Jiang Liang Sound
01.19.2011
11:47 pm

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Music

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“Dub Revolution Ina China.”  Jiang Liang Sound vs. Chinese propaganda footage and the “party is boundless.”

Jiang Liang is upholding a long and honored tradition that goes all the way back to when Leslie Kong left China in the late 1950s and opened a record store in Kingston, Jamaica. In 1962 he produced Bob Marley’s first two singles. Randy Chin, Byron Lee, The Chung Brothers, Herman Chin-Loy were Jamaican-based Chinese ex-patriots who were all involved with the production of seminal reggae tracks in the 1960s and 70s. Roots music is indeed multi-cultural.

Revolutions come out of the barrels of subwoofers.
 

 
Thanks Mark Kamins.

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Synapse attack: The sublime weirdness of Bryan Lewis Saunders
01.19.2011
10:09 pm

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Art
Drugs
Music

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Saunders on shrooms.
 
Bryan Lewis Saunders is a visual artist, musician and brain addled fucking dopefreak genius. Don’t stare at his self-portraits for too long or they’ll invade your soul like a swarm of amphetamine-crazed humming birds. Saunders’ approach to the demons inside his head is to unscrew the lid.

On March 30th 1995, I started doing at least one Self-Portrait everyday for the rest of my life. At present I have over 7,900 of them. Like fingerprints, snowflakes and DNA they are all different, no two are the same.  For hundreds of years, artists have been putting themselves into representations of the world around them. I am doing the exact opposite. I put the world around me into representations of myself as I find this more true to my Central Nervous System.”

Pay a visit to Saunders website and see what sleep deprivation, massive amounts of chemicals and divine intoxication can do to a man.
 

 
Thanks for the turn on I Heart Chaos

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Early Gay cinema: Jean Genet’s ‘Un chant d’amour’
01.19.2011
09:04 pm

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Art
History
Literature
Movies
Queer

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The other day I was looking at some old issues of the Village Voice from the later part of the 1960s and the early 1970s that I have in boxes in my garage. They’re really interesting and you can read some “coded” things in between the lines of a lot of the advertisements, such as coyly-worded ads for head shops and various diversions for people looking for something kinky to do. I think the preservation of the Village Voice as an archive of life in NYC will provide quite a lot for future anthropologists who’ll want to better understand how we lived in the second half of the 20th century and how quickly sexual mores changed over the decades. Launched in 1955, the Voice was really the first underground paper. New York City would obviously be one of the best microcosms of society to view at any time for the sheer diversity and number of its residents, but when you zero in on the time between 1965 until the end of the 1980s, and you look at the subculture, a hell of a lot changed in the margins before going wider in the culture. Some of the seeds planted then are still blooming today.

One thing that I noticed is that as the Sixties went on, the advertisements for gay-related films such as Jack Smith’s notorious Flaming Creatures, and Kenneth Anger’s Fireworks or Scorpio Rising start to creep into the listings for films like Andy Warhol’s Chelsea Girls and other more, uh, mainstream “underground film” fare of the era. And it’s always these same films, like they were playing constantly at the same two or three theaters, for like… years. Usually on a double or triple bill. Later Vapors directed by no-budget gay “outsider” auteur Andy Milligan gets rotated into the prurient programing circulating at these Times Square sin pits that had names like “The New David Cinema,” “The Adonis Lounge” and “The Tomkat.”

To the average Joe on the street, to the average Village Voice reader in 1967, or even to the NYPD’s vice squad, there was nothing much alarming in and of itself that a film titled Vapors was playing in Times Square. To someone who knew what Milligan’s short film was about (an awkward encounter in a gay bathhouse) these ads took on an entirely different connotation. In other words, these films were coded “dog whistles” indicating most likely that cruising (at the very least) would be tolerated in the balconies and toilets of these run down cinemas, often in buildings owned by the mob.

The fleabag movie theaters catering to an all male clientele ultimately lined 8th Ave. near 42nd Street until they cleaned up Times Square in the early 1990s. By the 1970s, the demure ads in the Village Voice ads were dispensed with completely and explicit gay porn ads begin to appear for movies with titles like Inches and Ramrodder. (Interesting to note that the Voice had quite an anti-gay tone in the 1960s until petitioned by the Gay Liberation Front to stop using terms like “faggots” when reporting on the Stonewall riots).

Another movie that showed up a couple of times in the pages of the Voice back then is French author Jean Genet’s short film, Un chant d’amour (“A Song of Love”). Directed by Genet in 1950, based loosely on his novel The Miracle of the Rose and with the rumored assistance of Jean Cocteau, the film was impounded in France when it was first screened and it became circulated as gay porn for French intellectual homosexuals in the years following. The silent b&w film shows the encounters two men in a French prison have, their dreams and fantasies, and the voyeurism of a sadomasochistic guard who is titillated by their relationship, spies on them and abuses one of them because of jealousy. It seems to be very influenced by Anger’s Fireworks, a film Genet most certainly would have seen via Cocteau, who considered the young Ken Anger his protege.

Fifteen years or so later, bootleg prints of Un chant d’amour must have made it to Times Square and this obscure work of poetic homosexual quasi-porn with a literary pedigree, more about the longing for human contact than the actual contact itself (flowers, a gun and cigarettes stand in—for the most part—for male genitalia) sent the Bat-signal to those for whom it was meant and they assembled by its flickering lantern to do who knows what?

By the mid-80s, when I saw Un chant d’amour on a triple bill with documentaries on Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir at the Thalia Cinema arthouse, not a single vice cop in New York City would have given a shit about something as ultimately kinda tame as Genet’s film. Still, bearing in mind that it was once something confiscated by police, became something that was passed around hand to hand amongst gay French intellectuals like a stag film, then screened in cinemas straight out of John Rechy’s novels, how odd/weird/amusing (or alarming, I suppose, depending on your viewpoint) is it to think that Un chant d’amour (and Vapors and Anger’s films and Jack Smith’s as well) can now be watched on YouTube?
 

 
And here is a chunk of Andy Milligan’s Vapors, from 1965, one of the very first films of its kind: a narrative softcore homosexual exploitation film.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Nightmare ‘Coachella’  2011 Lineup
01.19.2011
04:35 pm

Topics:
Amusing

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A snapshot of Hell.

(via TDW)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
John Butler’s superb animation ‘T.R.I.A.G.E.’
01.19.2011
04:10 pm

Topics:
Animation

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John Butler’s superb latest animation T.R.I.A.G.E. is a speculative tale showing how:

A sick and failing area is swiftly restored to sound financial health

T.R.A.G.E. is an acronym for

Target
Respond
Identify
Administer
Globalize
Exit

Sound familiar?

Of course, triage is “the process of determining the priority of patients’ treatments based on the severity of their condition.” With this in mind, any similarities between actual events is purely intentional.
 

 
Bonus animations by John Butler ‘Unmanned’ and ‘Sub Optimal’ after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Richard Dawkins: Faith School Menace?
01.19.2011
02:04 pm

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Following on from the post on Becky Fischer’s weirdo fundamentalist brainwashing for preteens, here’s Richard Dawkins’ recent documentary on faith schools and the damage they do to the minds of impressionable children. Here a more subdued Dawkins, who has been in these situations enough times to learn that all you have to do is let a fundie (of any religion) start talking and they will hang themselves with their own words, providing you with television gold in the process, does just that: He lets them talk

God Man, it must have been so demoralizing for him to go on these shoots! Some of this is just tragic. Supernatural beliefs should have no part in a proper education.

The number of faith schools in Britain is rising. Around 7,000 publicly-funded schools - one in three - now has a religious affiliation. As the coalition government paves the way for more faith-based education by promoting ‘free schools’, the renowned atheist and evolutionary biologist Professor Richard Dawkins says enough is enough.

In this passionately argued film, Dawkins calls on us to reconsider the consequences of faith education, which, he argues, bamboozles parents and indoctrinates and divides children. The film features robust exchanges with former Secretary of State for Education Charles Clarke, Head of the Church of England Education Service Reverend Janina Ainsworth, and the Chair of the Association of Muslim Schools, Dr Mohammed Mukadam.

It also features insights from child psychologists and key players in faith education as well as insights from both parents and pupils.

Dawkins also draws on his own personal history as a father, arguing that the government must stop funding new faith schools, and urges society to respect a child’s right to freedom of belief.

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
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