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Labtekwon: Black Skatepunk
06.14.2010
03:32 pm

Topics:
Music
Punk
Race

Tags:
punk
NEXT
labtekwon
hip-hop

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As James Spooner’s 2003 documentary Afro-Punk has shown, the black/punk marginalization continuum is as old as punk itself, and only scene demography has obstructed its full flowering. Indeed, its [anti-]institutional roots can be traced as far back as the early-‘80s establishment of the Black Rock Coalition in New York City by Vernon Reid and Greg Tate.

With this excellent video, veteran Baltimore MC Labtekwon plunks down a chit into the sweepstakes, positing punk as just another spot for forward-thinking hip-hop to grind. His dude-tacular flow seems a hat-tip to Mike Muir’s campy victim monologue in Suicidal Tendencies’ “Institutionalized,” and his new album NEXT: Baltimore Basquiat and the Future Shock is forthcoming.
 

 

Posted by Ron Nachmann | Leave a comment
How to pull a tooth with a rocket
06.14.2010
02:15 pm

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
teeth. rockets

 
Coming next, the circumcision!

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Tarkovsky’s Polaroids
06.14.2010
12:58 pm

Topics:
Art
Movies

Tags:
Polaroid
Tarkovsky

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Initially published in 2006, Instant Light: Tarkovsky Polaroids revealed a selection of enigmatic shots taken in Italy and at Tarkovsky’s home, thick with atmosphere, that could easily pass for stills from his films. Follow the link below to the entire collection, recently scanned for a Russian site.
 
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Las Polaroid de Tarkovsky (Poemas del río Wang)
 
АНДРЕЙ ТАРКОВСКИЙ СВЕТОПИСЬ Полароиды (complete Tarkovsky Polaroids)
 
thx Kurt Ralske !

Posted by Brad Laner | Leave a comment
The Lunar Museum of Modern Art

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(MOMA on a moon chip: clockwise, from top left: Warhol, Rauschenberg, Novros, Chamberlain, Oldenburg and Myers)
 
The PBS series History Detectives kicks off next week, and its season premiere explores the possibility that in November of ‘69, the Apollo 12 lunar module carried with it a ceramic chip covered with original sketches by Andy Warhol, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, David Novros, John Chamberlain, and Forrest Myers.

According to the series clip below, sculptor Myers (best know, perhaps, for SOHO’s Wall Piece) was the man behind the “moon museum” chip, and the clandestine effort to stash it somewhere within the module:

Going to the moon was the biggest thing in our generation.  It’s hard to explain that to the kids today…My idea was to get six great artists together and make a tiny little museum that would be on the moon.

Anywhere from 20 to 40 of the chips were fabricated, and, given the chip’s dimensions, the artists involved were forced to make a maximum statement in a minimum space.  Rauschenberg sketched a straight line, while Warhol cheekily offered up his “initials.”  But is is the chip really there?

Since no one can confirm it back on Earth, it’s going to take a future moon walker-slash-art aficionado to say for sure.

 
(via HyperAllergic)

Posted by Bradley Novicoff | Leave a comment
The experimental noise music of Rod McKuen
06.14.2010
10:00 am

Topics:
Music

Tags:
Experimental music
Rod Mckuen

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Although it sounds like a string of non-sequiters, America’s favorite poet, under the hilarious pseudonym Heins Hoffman-Richter, was behind this 1974 quasi-experimental music record. And y’know what ? It’s not half bad as far as quasi-experimental music goes !
via Weirdo records:

Subtitled: Symphony for Tape Delay, IBM Instruction Manual, & Ohm Septet. Rod McKuen‘s label Stanyan put out this exploito/fake avant-classical record, and since Stanyan basically was McKuen, you can bet your bottom dollar that Rod himself did the cut & pasting here. Big chunks of samples from Raymond Scott’s ‘Soothing Sounds For Baby’, feedback, tape echo, sound effects from the local beach, etc. Liner notes & track titles just scream of Rod’s writing.

Posted by Brad Laner | Leave a comment
Picture perfect: America 2010
06.14.2010
09:15 am

Topics:
Amusing
Environment
Politics

Tags:

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Photo by Lily E. via Wonkette
 
This pretty much sums it up.
 
All of America Captured In Single Photograph

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Dangerous Minds Readers!  Download my new album for free!
06.14.2010
08:57 am

Topics:

Tags:

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My new album One For All Without Hesitation will be dropping in several formats June 22nd.  In digital land, Alpha Pup Records will be handling business.  Getting it this way gets you three bonus tracks plus instrumentals to the entire album.  In the physical realm, Delicious Vinyl will release it on CD, complete with an 8 page lyric book, and limited edition LP.  DV of course the home of classics such as Tone Loc’s Wild Thing, Young MC’s Bust a Move, and the perfect album that is Bizarre Ride to the Pharcyde

But you Dangerous Minds readers can get the first 10 songs for free now!  And even read the lyrics while you listen to it for free!  Oh the internet!  Oh free stuff!  Oh free stuff!

I have been MIA on here due to a tour of southeast Asia.  There will be photos and videos from the trip soon… including one of me eating a beating cobra heart!  Stay tuned!  Down below is a sneak peak at the title track.
 

 

Posted by Elvin Estela | Leave a comment
How Africans view white culture in Austria
06.13.2010
09:32 pm

Topics:
Amusing

Tags:
comedy

 
Clip from a mockumentary about how Africans view white culture in Austria, a land where “no black man has ever stepped foot.” Does anyone know what this is from? It reminds me of the brilliant retro comedy series, Look Around You created by Robert Popper and Peter Serafinowicz. I’d love to see the entire thing, this clip is but a cruel tease! (Reminds me of Martin Mull’s mid-80s HBO series, The History of White People in America. I will never forget the scene with Fred Willard as a clueless white man (his forte, obviously) barbecuing in his backyard wearing an apron with a cartoon hot dog asking “What Do You Want on Yours?”)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Jeff Turner tells his side of the Alyssa Milano story
06.13.2010
09:18 pm

Topics:
Kooks

Tags:
celebrity stalkers

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Jeff Turner, one of the Tiffany-obsessed fans profiled in the documentary I Think We’re Alone Now, decided he was going to drop Tiffany and start stalking Alyssa Milano instead. On the night of December 23rd, 2008 he went to the actresses’ house and things went very poorly for him. The resulting arrest and story was told on Access Hollywood and gossip blogs all over the Internet.

Here is Turner’s side of the story, as told to the I Think We’re Alone Now filmmakers:
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
Charles Fort: The original Art Bell

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You could call Charles Fort (1874 – 1932) the “first Ufologist”—and many do—but that’s already, um, damning the quirky author of The Book of the Damned with feint praise. Fort was more of a scientist (or scientific researcher), but not in any sort of traditional sense most people would recognize as science. A better description of his interests would be to say that what fascinated Fort were the things which were intellectually excluded by science. Rains of frogs, alien spacecraft, meat falling from the sky and spontaneous human combustion were the grist for his mill and this is what he spent his life meticulously cataloging.

Fort was also a bit of a comedian, a Swiftian satirist of science. He hated the idea of experts and thumbed his nose at scientific authority. Fort was a sworn enemy of orthodox rationality. His prose is a delight and is a part of his strong attraction for many readers. His style is “circular,” I guess you might say. Repetitive, but this is kind of the point, to be bludgeoned by the sheer force of the number of examples he’d throw at readers, into accepting the simple fact that something awfully strange is going on here.

Fort, who invented words like “teleporter” kept his notes, his Forteana, if you will, on notecards. Although from time to time, the eccentric author would burn his research, tens of thousands of his cards survive and can be viewed at the New York Library’s Rare Book Room (I’ve looked at some of them myself). In his day, Fort had his share of detracters (his friend H.L. Mencken said his head was filled with “Bohemian mush”!) but also many prominent admirers such as Ben Hecht, Theodore Drieser and Oliver Wendell Homes.

The influence of Charles Fort’s work is subtle but pervasive throughout popular culture. No Fort, no X-Files, for instance. No Art Bell or George Noory, either. Although Fort was in life and after his death, a relatively obscure writer, his work still holds a strong fascination for many people who consider him an intellectual giant. And of course there is a magazine, The Fortean Times, which keeps the flame alive as well as regional organizations of Fortean enthusiasts and a yearly convention.

Dangerous Minds pal Skylaire Alfvegren organizes The League of Western Fortean Intermediatists (or L.O.W.F.I) and she’s got a great short biographical essay of Charles Fort at the Fortean West website:

There is a man, largely undiscovered by the modern world, whom I, and many others, believe made one of the most significant contributions to the world of science. Had it not been that he vehemently opposed modern scientists and their methods, his work might be enjoying a greater popularity than it does. Had this man decided to write about completely different topics, he would be hailed as a fabulous literary character. Here was a peculiar fellow. Charles Fort devoted 26 years of his life to compiling documented reports of scientific anomalies from journals and newspapers from all around the world. He lived in dire poverty so that truth could prevail. His life’s work may one day be of great scientific worth, should the established scientific community ever muster the courage to approach it.

Anomalies. This is what Fort trafficked in. Reports of prehistoric beasts frolicking in the world’s oceans. (Loch Ness, Champ, Storsjon Animal). Ancient artifacts found in improbable places (Roman coins in the deserts of Arizona, Chinese seals found buried deep in the forests of Ireland, small statues of horses discovered in pre-Columbian Venezuela). Falls of things other than rain from the sky (red rains in 1571 England, 1744 Genoa; a rain of “73 organic formations, particular to South America” in France in 1846). Unidentified aerial phenomena (excluding Ezekiel’s Biblical description. Fort’s list contains the first known report of a so-called “UFO”, dating from 1779). These are but a few of the subjects Fort spent his lifetime collecting reports of. This anomalous data are roped together under the banner of “Forteana”, a term which probably does not exist in any dictionary, because that which it pertains to isn’t supposed to exist at all.

He who championed underdogs, has been and will likely continue to be, one of the greatest underdogs of all time. For he has not a baseball team or brooding thespians to compete with, but the entire history of the scientific world. His work spat in the face of conventional scientists. There is much going on around us that defies explanation. Fort amassed reports of events seen by humans around the world countless times, which, none the less, have been dismissed. The data he collected were excommunicated by science, which acts like a religion. “The monks of science” he wrote, “dwell on smuggeries that are walled away from event-jungles- Science has done its utmost to prevent whatever science has done” (the Book of the Damned, p. 245). His legacy, his collection of data lies before us. It is indisputable, and yet still ignored. The reports he gathered could make any enemy of science acquire a renewed enthusiasm for the subject. In his four published works, the Book of the Damned (1919). New Lands (1923) Lo! (1931) and Wild Talents (1932) we find over 1,200 documented reports of occurrences which orthodox science refuses to attempt to explain. Explanation was not Fort’s purpose. He merely presented the data, sometimes with his own speculations, sometimes with tongue in cheek. While anomalies can be entertaining, they can also be deeply disturbing, for they undermine the foundations of science, the idea that every thing in this world is rational and under control. Articles like those collected in Fortean Times and the INFO Journal (International Fortean Organization), two publications which continue Fort’s work, prove that things are not under our control, nor will they ever be. Many people, including scientists, find this discomforting and so ignore that which they cannot explain.

The Life, Work and Influence of Charles Fort (Fortean West)

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
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