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Marcel Duchamp’s Anemic Cinema
10.19.2011
08:05 pm

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Duchamp’s Anemic Cinema is recalled as a collaboration between Duchamp and Man Ray, but it was really a collaboration between May Ray and Duchamp’s female alter ego Rrose Selavy (c’est la vie, geddit?). It was made with Duchamp’s kinetic sculptures, the Rotoreliefs, which I have written about before here. The title Anemic Cinema is a near palindrome.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds:

Dreams Money Can Buy: Surrealist Feature Film from 1947

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘Batbaby’: campy Halloween fun from Fred Schneider’s The Superions
10.19.2011
08:02 pm

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Music
Occult

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Here’s a fun music video homage to B-Movies from The Superions, Fred Schneider of the B52’s other band (who unsurprisingly don’t sound a whole lot different). While the tune is reminiscent of “Rock Lobster” as replayed by Keyboard Cat, the hook will be running around in your head for some time. The video follows the adventures of the titular Batbaby, and features an intro from the very intriguing Babette Bombshell, who comes off like a cross between Elvira and Divine. Well, it is Halloween after all: 

The Superions “Batbaby”
 

 
The Superions’ Batbaby EP is available to buy on MP3 here.

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Leave a comment
Joy Division: In Concert and On Film
10.19.2011
07:35 pm

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Music
Pop Culture

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No pix just sound. Joy Division live at the Bowdon Vale Youth Club, Altrincham, England, March 14th 1979. Close your eyes and you’re there.

Set list:

01. “Exercise One” 0:00
02. “She’s Lost Control” 2:54
03. “Shadowplay” 7:11
04. “Leaders Of Men” 10:58
05. “Insight” 13:23
06. “Disorder” 17:04
07. “Glass” 20:36
08. “Digital” 24:03
09. “Ice Age” 27:00
10. “Warsaw” 30:15
11. “Transmission” 32:37
12. “I Remember Nothing” 36:07
13. “No Love Lost” 42:40
 

 
Pix and sound. Grant Gee’s impressive 2007 documentary Joy Divsion definitively brings together all the elements of the band’s story (some parts of which has been heard in other films, in other documentaries) together into one complete and engrossing film. Written by Jon Savage and containing interviews from Bernard Sumner, Stephen Morris, Peter Hook, Tony Wilson, Rob Gretton, Peter Saville, Anton Corbijn, Genesis P. Orridge, together with archive footage of Joy Division, Martin Hannett, John Peel and Ian Curtis.

This version is in English with sub-titles in Spanish.
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Candy: A Cult Film So Bad That It’s Just Bad
10.19.2011
04:15 pm

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Candy should, I repeat should be off the scale incredible. But it’s not.

Candy was a film that was always talked about, but no one ever saw it. The poster of Candy topless in the airplane cockpit would always be for sale in the back pages of magazines like “Famous Monsters of Filmland” next to ones of King Kong and Frankenstein and it became a familiar image of the era. But the movie you never saw. Not on any late night movie show, never on a Sunday morning “Million Dollar Movie” or anything like that, Candy was seemingly banned from TV for being too racy and for whatever reason was never released on VHS either. Nor was it ever on HBO or Showtime. It was the great lost movie in my eyes.

I became mildly obsessed with this film I could never see and went about collecting movie posters, lobby cards, publicity photos and I own several different versions of the novel by Terry Southern and Mason Hoffenberg with different groovy covers. The mythical Candy became a cult movie Holy Grail for me. I really built it up in my mind. For years I tried to get hold of a copy in the tape trading underground, but the best I was ever able to find was still unwatchable. Then finally it came out on DVD. It was like Christmas had arrived.

But it sucked! Really sucked. It was such a let down!

I mean just LOOK at the cast: Ringo Starr (Emmanuel, the Mexican gardener), Charles Aznavour (the horny hunchback), Marlon Brando (Grindl, the horny (fake) Indian guru), Richard Burton (MacPhisto, the drunk, horny Welsh poet), James Coburn (egotistical surgeon), John Huston (dirty old man doctor) and Walter Matthau (horny military general). Sugar Ray Robinson and Anita Pallenberg make cameo appearances. How could you go wrong with a cast like that?

Let’s not forget the amazing opening space travel sequence by Douglas Trumbull who went on to make 2001 with Stanley Kubrick. And the soundtrack by The Byrds, Steppenwolf and soundtrack great Dave Grusin (it’s INCREDIBLE and easy to find on audio blogs). The script was adapted by Buck Henry. HOW could this fail?

It even featured the decade defining pulchritude of Miss Teen Sweden, Ewa Aulin, in the title role of “Candy Christian,” the ultimate All-American girl.

But despite all this Candy is a terrible film and even worse, it’s boring.

One of the things that must have mucked up things badly for the production is—and I am just theorizing here—the contracts for the lead actors. These were THE leading actors of the day, all of them top drawer A-list 60s talent. After watching Candy the thought occurred to me that Marlon Brando’s agent probably asked how much screen time Richard Burton was getting and demanded the same for his client. Then James Coburn’s manager asked the same question and demanded equal time for his client and so on and so until each actor was guaranteed “Most Favored Nations” equal screen time. How else to explain the film’s structure? It’s maddening to watch and Candy feels like it’s never going to end.

STILL, I’m not saying it’s so bad you shouldn’t watch it. Actually I think that if this sounds even remotely intriguing to you then it’s definitely worth seeing. It’s not good, no, we’ve already established that fact, but it is a super insane, trippy, campy relic of the 1960s with some of the most iconic actors of the decade behaving like total hambones, each trying to outdo the other in chewing up the scenery.


Candy

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘11th & B’: Film footage of the Lower East Side in the early 1980s
10.19.2011
03:56 pm

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History
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Photo credit: 1980 © Brian Rose/Ed Fausty
 
French film maker Marie Martine directed this short documentary that captures the spirit and flavor of New York’s Lower East Side before the yuppie invasion. Made in 1983, the film features music by Alan Vega, Martin Rev, The False Prophets and scenes of artist Scott Borofsky creating street art.

In the seventies hundreds of buildings were abandoned, buildings with no heat, no hot water, no locks. The landlords had wrung all the money they could get out of them….Today [1984] whole blocks between Avenues A and D are lined with the carcasses of buildings. Vast stretches of land are covered with crumbled bricks and cement. Until recently, lines of drug buyers snaked around the blocks….When Father Moloney found a dead body near the Christadora Building last year, the police acted almost unconcerned. ‘We are in a no man’s land,’ he was told. ‘They can dump anything they want here.” New York magazine - May 28, 1984.

I love the fleeting glimpses of downtown faces.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Chrome: Alien Soundtracks
10.19.2011
03:11 pm

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Music

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I was exposed to Chrome pretty early on, in both their career and my own as a music fan. A kid in my hometown, one of only a tiny handful of “punkers” (as we were called in the 7th grade), had Alien Soundtracks and we were all pretty sold on it, all of us punkers. They sounded like the Stooges channeled through a Philip K. Dick novel (or A Clockwork Orange, of course). Much later I saw Helios Creed in concert and his psychotic/psychedelic guitar playing turned my body into molecules. Then I’d be solid again. Then molecular. Someone stage-diving kicked me in the eye with their Doc Martens, but it was still a rad experience! Did I mention I was on acid at the time?

Here’s a clip for my top favorite Chrome song, “Meet You In the Subway.” Dig their bezoomny outfits, my droogie brothers!
 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
30 second shards of Hell: Excerpts from the new Lou Reed/Metallica album
10.19.2011
03:03 pm

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Music
Punk

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Here are some 30 second excerpts from all of the tracks on the new Lou Reed/Metallica album Lulu.

What do you think?

Though it’s hard to judge an entire album based on 30 second clips, some of the bits sound to me like the highly amplified rumbling sludge of a lower intestinal tract infection fronted by the guy who works the complaint desk in Hell. Muddle machine music.

Track two, “The View,” is presented in its entirety.
 

Lulu (30-second Samples) by Lou Reed & Metallica

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Jane Birkin: ‘Di Doo Dah’
10.19.2011
02:44 pm

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I thought I’d seen every Gainsbourg/Birkin video out there, but this is a new one for me: Jane singing ‘Di Doo Dah’ from 1973.

Song written by her paramour Serge Gainsbourg.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Michael Winslow’s AMAZING cover of Led Zeppelin’s ‘Whole Lotta Love’
10.19.2011
02:10 pm

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Music

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Michael Winslow performs Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love” on Norwegian TV show Senkveld med Thomas og Harald. Holy crap! 
 

 
Thanks you, Skye Nicolas and High Definte!

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Behind the scenes with ‘Baby Jane’
10.19.2011
11:23 am

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Amusing
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Here’s a little treat, a vintage, short film looking behind the scenes of Robert Aldrich’s classic movie Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?
 

 
Via Hidden Los Angeles
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
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