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Cool shirts wth Hayao Miyazaki storyboard art on them
06.06.2016
12:54 pm

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Fashion
Movies

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I wish I understood Japanese, because then I’d have much better shot at navigating a series of pages on Japanese Amazon that purports to offer some really excellent-looking button-down shirts and T-shirts featuring storyboards drawn by the great animation master Hayao Miyazaki, co-founder of Studio Ghibli, a.k.a. the best thing to happen to little kids since the creation of the Muppets

The storyboards all appear to derive from a 1978 TV series called Future Boy Conan (also called Conan, The Boy in Future) that originally aired on Japan’s NHK network.

Future Boy Conan isn’t as well known in the English-speaking world as later Miyazaki masterpieces like Spirited Away and My Neighbor Totoro, but the series has a special significance as Miyazaki’s directorial debut, on which, Wikipedia states, he “also contributed to character designs and storyboards.” Ahem.

A company called graniph is responsible for the shirts. All of the T-shirts cost 2160 yen (slightly over $20) and the one instance of a button-down shirt I found—I think I like that one the best, actually—costs 4838 yen (slightly over $45).

For English-speakers, it’s often difficult to use the search function and bring up the correct item. We’ve posted pics and links to a good many of these Miyazaki shirts, but we didn’t include all of them. If you want to find them, your best bet is that “Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought” row—if you click around with enough persistence, you will hit all of them, as far as I know. This is a good starting point.
 

 

 

(Graniph) graniph collaboration short-sleeved shirt / storyboard pattern (Future Boy Conan) (White)
 
Much more after the jump…....
 

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
A gorgeous gallery of ‘ultra-chic’ men’s hairstyles from the 70s
06.06.2016
11:29 am

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Amusing
Fashion
History

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I always get a good chuckle when I see those oh-so-perfectly coiffed men’s hairdos from the 70s. I’m just marveling at the Bay City Rollers-meet-Jesus-freakiness of some of these hairy head shots, presumably taken from men’s hair magazines from the early to mid 70s. Imagine the time and effort it took to perfect these amazing looks on a daily basis? How awesome the 1970s must have been.

I wonder if when these styles will make a comeback and push aside the already passé hipster man bun? History always repeats itself. (Except for powdered wigs. That’s not gonna happen.) Trust me, you’re going to see these styles again if ain’t happening already as I type this. And I can’t wait.


 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Slayer, Maiden, Metallica and more in an amazing trove of ‘80s heavy metal shirts
05.25.2016
10:10 am

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Fashion
Music

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God bless the human magpies, for without them, finds like this wouldn’t come to light: Erna “Shelly” Hammer, an erstwhile DJ for the once-mighty Z Rock chain of heavy metal radio stations (under the name “Shelly Steel,” because evidently “Hammer” was somehow an insufficiently metal surname on its own…?), is exhibiting her collection of metal and alt-rock t-shirts, ranging in vintage from the early ‘80s to the mid ‘90s. In her lifetime of collecting, she’s discarded very little—what’s on display is a fraction of what she’s kept from her many years as an avid concertgoer, and from her time on the promo gravy train.

This is a good place to mention that this has been been a good week for vintage metal tees—Craig “The Human Clock” Giffen posted an amazing bit of pop culture archaeology (formatted in an amazingly archaic HTML style) endeavoring to catalog all the t-shirts spotted in Jeff Krulik’s classic short documentary Heavy Metal Parking Lot. By all means, take a minute to check it out, this post’ll still be here when you get back.

If you happen to be in Northeast Ohio, you can see these shirts on display in a show called “You Are What You Wear” at poster artist Derek Hess’ eponymous gallery through mid-summer. They aren’t being offered for sale piece-by-piece, but when she talked with us about her, um, wardrobe archive, Hammer implied that selling them off in a single lot for the right sum wouldn’t be out of the question.
 

 
Hammer: The first real rock shows I went to, I was 15, and this guy I worked with at this diner first took me with him and his friends to see Aerosmith, and then a few months later, Kiss. I was in awe. I didn’t really get to go to too many more shows until I was driving, so I mail ordered shirts, whatever I could get.
 

 
Hammer: I had an awful lot, but I wore them—you can see some of them are pretty beat up, stretched, over-laundered. I bought them to wear, there was no intention of collecting. The only ones I got rid of were when I moved, I got rid of a bunch that were promo when I worked in radio, for bands I didn’t really care about. I got rid of a whole crate! All of the shirts from bands that meant something to me, I hung on to.
 

 
Hammer:  I never thought about selling them. When I got asked to do the exhibit, I was even skeptical about that, I asked “do people really want to look at a bunch of shirts?” and they assured me it would be cool. But there’s always a price on everything, you know. And eventually, after turning 50, it’s normal to want to start downsizing. So they could be for sale. But there’d still be one or two I’d have to hang on to.
 

 
Hammer: The one thing I love about shirts, it’s kind of like a club. When you see someone in a concert shirt by a band you like somewhere, especially if it’s a remote place where you don’t expect it, you feel a brotherhood or sisterhood with that person you know saw the same show as you did—they’re conversation starters!
 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Ron Kretsch | Leave a comment
Surly socks with brutally honest messages for everyday wear!
05.23.2016
10:06 am

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Amusing
Fashion

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I saw this image of the “I hate everyone too” sock featured on the Arbroath blog. I thought to myself, “Is this a real sock design?” and I will admit that I kinda want to own a pair. After doing some digging around, I discovered that they’re indeed real and that they’re made by Blue Q. Not only is there the “I hate everyone too” sock design but I found several other surly sock designs to my evil delight.

Most of the women’s socks retail for $9.99 and men’s sell for $11.99. The sale item socks go for around $4.99.


 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
A nostalgic look at American malls of the late 1980s
05.19.2016
11:02 am

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Amusing
Fashion
History

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Malls are not the center of our cultural sphere anymore. They’re not new and shiny. We’ve moved on, and now we have the Internet. ~ Michael Galinsky

For the past few years I’ve seen these photos making the rounds on the Internet—usually uncredited—and I never really knew their provenance, but I was always intrigued by them. Well now I know where they’re from. The photos, of American malls and the folks who occupied them, were shot back in 1989 by the then 20-year-old photographer and student, Michael Galinsky.

Starting in the winter of 1989 with the Smith Haven Mall in Garden City Long Island, Galinsky photographed malls from North Carolina to South Dakota, Washington State and beyond. The photos he took capture life in these malls as it began to shift from the shiny excess of the 1980s towards an era of slackers and grunge culture.

Malls Across America is filled with seemingly lost or harried families navigating their way through these temples of consumerism, along with playful teens, misfits, and the aged with best ps3 bluetooth headset. There is a sense of claustrophobia to the images, even in those that hint at wide commercial expanses – a wall or a ceiling is always there to block the horizon. These photos never settle or focus on any one detail, creating the sense that they are stolen records of the most immediate kind.

The images are nostalgic as hell and bring me back to the days of Aqua Net hairspray, food courts and acid-washed jeans.

If you’d like to see more images like this, they’re available in Galinsky’s book Malls Across America.


 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Brian Eno answers a fan’s question about his makeup 1973
05.17.2016
09:30 am

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Heroes

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Too much blusher, Bri?
 
The question came from Brenda in Barnwood, Gloucester, who asked:

What make-up does Eno use on and off stage and does he sing on any tracks of “Roxy Music”?

Brenda was one of three readers who sent in questions for Brian Eno to Melody Maker, April 21st 1973. Eno was more than happy to share his favorite makeup tips:

My make up is the same both on and off stage to a greater or lesser degree. It consists of a large selection of things including Quant, Revlon, Schwarzkopps and Yardley. I just choose whatever colour appeals to me at the time.

On my eyes I use six different colours by three different makers. I’m using Quant crayons quite a lot at present

 
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His favorite crayons by Mary Quant.
 
Quant crayons came out sometime around the late 1960s—dates vary between 1966 to 1969. These make-up accessories were de rigueur for many a young girl and ambitious glam rocker. According to those who used and liked Quant’s crayons—they were “really high quality, the colors were great and they blended incredibly well.”

Alas, these exotic crayons are no longer available, but questioner Brenda Merrett is still a fan of Eno.
 
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As for singing with Roxy Music Eno replied:

I don’t sing lead vocals at any time—only backing vocals. These are nearly always done by Andy MacKay and myself. Examples are “Would You Believe,” “If There Is Something” and “Bitter’s [sic] End.”

Eno joined Roxy Music after a chance meeting:

As a result of going into a subway station and meeting saxophonist Andy Mackay, I joined Roxy Music, and, as a result of that, I have a career in music. If I’d walked ten yards further on the platform, or missed that train, or been in the next carriage, I probably would have been an art teacher now.

After the jump, Brian Eno singing his debut single “Seven Deadly Finns” on Dutch television…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Inexplicable travel bag featuring Iggy Pop
05.16.2016
02:28 pm

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Amusing
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Have you ever thought to yourself “Gee, I wonder if there are any Igg Pop travel bags out there?” Well, lo and behold there is. We live in a day and age where anything is possible. And that means an Iggy Pop travel bag can be yours. As inexplicable as that sounds, I must admit, I kinda dig this bag.

The bag comes in two sizes, small (18.5” x 8.26” x 9.84”) or large (20.87” x 12.01” x 9.84). Apparenlty it’s handmade and takes about 7 days to deliver. If you like it, the price for a small bag is $75.63 and the larger one is $87.21.

If Iggy Pop isn’t your… bag, then there are Prince and David Bowie travel bags, too!


 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Vintage photos of the US Amateur Roller Skating Association
05.13.2016
10:06 am

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Fashion
Pop Culture
Sports

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1967
Skaters from the 1967 U.S.A.R.S.A. (the United States Amateur Roller Skating Association) competition.
 
Although I was an avid roller skater in my youth (as were both of my parents), I had no idea that the the United States National Amateur Skating Association (or U.S.N.A.S.A.) existed. Had I known, I would have immediately run away from home with my brown suede skates (with sweet orange wheels and stoppers) to pursue my dream of being an Olympic Champion roller skater. Regrets, I’ve had a few.
 

USARSA Senior Dance Champions of 1961, Jay & Janet Slaughter of Illinois.
 
In 1937, a Detroit-based group comprised of seventeen roller rink owners formed the RSROA (the Roller Skating Rink Operators Association). The creation of the RSROA didn’t go over that well with the Amateur Athletic Union (or AAU, a national amateur sports organization formed in 1888 who worked with amateur athletes all around the country, helping many on their way to the Olympic Games) as the membership of RSROA included the rink owners themselves and professional skaters. So, in 1939, the United States Amateur Roller Skating Association (USARSA) came to be and became a part of the the good-old AAU.

There were so many competitive categories within the USARSA, ranging from skate-dancing, novice, a curious sub-novice category, and a few for “tiny tots” that could skate (photos from which have been cataloged over at the site USA Roller Skaters), that I can only imagine the competitions themselves were long, grueling events not only for the skaters, but for the fans in attendance. The images in this post provide a fun and fascinating look back in time. Some remind me of the beautiful awkwardness that is the obligatory (and dreaded) senior prom photo. Your good-times roller skating flashback moment, begins now! 
 

Hugh Devore 3rd Place (the outfit is 1st place material all the way), USARSA Senior Men’s Singles, 1956.
 

USARSA Junior Dance contestants, 1953.
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
‘Sexy’ eagle’s head crotch underwear for men
05.09.2016
10:47 am

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Amusing
Animals
Fashion

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Remember how I blogged about the “sexy” wolf’s head crotch underwear for men a few weeks ago on Dangerous Minds? How could you forget, right? Anyway, who the heck thought that could be topped? Well, either the same company just released a new style or somehow I missed them but we now have “sexy” eagle’s head crotch underwear for men.

If you gotta have ‘em, it appears that you can get them from Amazon Japan or from Chinese online retailer Ali’s Express for around $18.99.

Don’t you wish you could see a photo of who is buying these things?


 

 

 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Just what the doctor ordered: Artist makes nightgown from 2,000 sleeping pill prescriptions
05.05.2016
09:28 am

Topics:
Art
Fashion

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Erica Spitzer Rasmussen is an insomniac. A good night’s sleep for the artist from St. Paul, Minnesota usually requires medication. Unlike most of us who would bemoan their time counting sheep or tossing and turning the night away, Rasmussen decided to use her own experience of insomnia to create a work of a beautiful work of art:

Dreaming of Sleep is the title of Rasmussen’s “sculptural object.” A floor-length nightgown made from 2,000 prescriptions for sleeping pills. The idea came to her about three years ago after a particularly restless night:

“I finally fell asleep in the early morning hours. When I reached a few fleeting moments of sleep, I dreamt about sleeping peacefully. Shortly thereafter the alarm clock woke me and I wrote ‘dreaming of sleep’ on a pad of paper next to the bed.

“Sadly, a satisfying night’s sleep for me generally requires medication. Dreaming of Sleep is a self-portrait that illustrates my dependence on those staples of the pharmaceutical industry.

 
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The four-foot high nightgown took four months to complete and is made from eight-foot rolls of customized “wallpaper” created from scans of sleeping tablet prescriptions.

“The nightgown was intentionally executed in a simplistic shape and lack-luster palette to refer to the sterile, clinical fashion associated with the medical community.”

Rasmussen describes herself as an artist who “creates handmade paper garments, neckwear and small editions of hand-bound books.” Her sculptural and wearable works are exhibited internationally and can be seen here.
 
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More after the jump…

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
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