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The worst f*cking shoes on the planet: Cowboy sandal boots
06.15.2015
10:15 am

Topics:
Amusing
Fashion
Stupid or Evil?

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I hate these shoes. I mean, I really hate them. I know it’s totally irrational—not to mention a big ole waste of time—to homicidally hate on these specific shoes with such venom, but just look at these fucking things and tell me you don’t feel the same way? Why? Why? And WHY?

Perhaps I’m in the minority here and you, dear Dangerous Minds reader, simply must have a pair. Scotty Franklin of Springfield, Missouri, customizes people’s personal boots and turns them into, er, these for $50. Fuck you, Scotty.


 

 

 
via Neatorama and Pee-wee Herman

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Elvis Presley, Perry Como… Minor Threat? Granny panties, now for hipsters!
06.15.2015
05:10 am

Topics:
Fashion
Music

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According to the Internet, 2015 is the year granny panties come back into style.

Whether this is a result of a healthier body-positive society or simply hipster “normcore” irony infiltrating the undergarment market, it’s certainly a clear-cut case of “everything old is new again.”

Here’s a trend we’d really love to see come back: granny panties embroidered with little 45 rpm records—you buy six of them and get a free single!
 

The music fan in this photo may want to consider using a pair over her greasy mitts, as her record handling skills leave something to be desired.
 
The 1958 Sears catalog ad features an unbeatable deal: You buy six adorable pairs of embroidered panties, and you get a free record of your choice: Elvis Presley, Eddie Fisher, or Perry Como!
 

Now, we’re not sure how many underthings Eddie Fisher or Perry Como were moving, but we’re pretty sure Elvis was causing lots and lots of panties to need replacing back in ‘58.
 
Fast-forward to 2015’s granny panty offerings after the jump…

Posted by Christopher Bickel | Leave a comment
Calling for a moratorium on Joy Division mashup T-shirts
06.11.2015
06:53 am

Topics:
Fashion
Music

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Peter Saville‘s iconic cover art for Joy Division‘s Unknown Pleasures album is becoming nearly as ubiquitous as the Black Flag bars when it comes to Post-Irony Age Internet appropriation. If there’s any question, we’re offering two dozen examples of t-shirt mashups that make us hate life.

Oscar Wilde said that sarcasm was “the lowest form of wit,” but Wilde never lived to experience the “mashup” genre. As Ian Curtis himself questioned on the Unknown Pleasures album: “Where will it end?”
 

We posted about this one, actually produced by the Walt Disney Corporation, back in 2012. It was killed by an angry Internet, and removed from the Disney catalog.
 

 
Worf/Unknown Pleasures mashup. - We wrote about this one last year. From Threadless.
 
More of these mashups after the jump…

Posted by Christopher Bickel | Leave a comment
Never-before-seen photos of Brigitte Bardot
06.09.2015
10:28 am

Topics:
Fashion
Pop Culture

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Photographer Ray Bellisario, best known as “London’s first paparazzo,” was absolutely loathed by the Royal Family for his tireless pursuit of their private moments—Prince Phillip got him blacklisted from most British newspapers and joked about sending him to London Tower, and Princess Margaret used to refer to him as “that bloody Bellisario.” Photos of Prince Charles waterskiing hardly qualify as “tawdry” to our modern eyes, but at the time Bellisario was considered the most vulgar of characters—he was not considered an “artist,” to say the least.

Two years ago, Bellisario began selling off his collection—much of it unpublished—for charity; his previously unseen photos of Brigitte Bardot are now being shown at Dadiani Fine Art gallery, a far cry from the Euro-tabloids that made him famous. 13 Unseen Photographs, London 1968 show Bardot as a much more willing subject than the Royals. At this point in her career, she was already a massive star, and likely used to the camera. The pictures are beautiful, and not just because of Bardot. Bellisario has instincts for light and composition, and the random collection candids actually look like a high-end photo editorial spread.
 

 

 

 
More after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
The wild wild world of Japanese rebel biker culture
05.28.2015
11:50 am

Topics:
Fashion
History
Pop Culture

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Former bosozuku leader, Kazuhiro Hazuki
 

“I was interested in them because they were punks and they were against society.”—Kazuhiro Hazuki, Narushino Specter gang

 
Back in the 1970s the term bōsōzoku (or “speed tribes”) was first used to describe Japanese biker gangs that routinely fought in the streets with rival gangs and the police. Often dressed like Kamikaze pilots, the bōsōzoku wreaked havoc speeding through the streets on their illegally modified bikes, blowing through red lights, and smashing the car windows of any motorist that dared defy them with baseball bats. Foreigners were an especially favorite target of the bōsōzoku’s aggression.
 
Bosozuku photo from a Japanese biker magazine with modified bike and helmet
Bōsōzoku biker with illegally modified bike and helmet (taken from a Japanese biker magazine)
 
Bosozuku bikers, 1970's
Bōsōzoku bikers, 1970’s
 
Bosozuku biker with his bike and bat, 1980's
Bōsōzoku biker, 1980’s
 
Bosozuku biker with bike and bat
 
The earliest incarnation of the bōsōzoku, the kaminari zoku, appeared in the 1950’s. Not unlike their idols from the films, The Wild Ones or Rebel Without a Cause, the group was formed by the youthful and disenchanted members of Japan’s proletariat, and the gang provided a place for the emerging delinquents to call their own. A fiercely disciplined and rebellious group, the bōsōzoku once boasted more than 40,000 members. By 2003 the bōsōzoku’s numbers had dwindled to just over 7000. According to first-hand accounts from former senior members, the modern version of the bōsōzoku (known as Kyushakai) no longer embody the rebel spirit of their predecessors. In fact, some have returned to homaging their rockabilly idols by donning elaborate Riizentos, a style of pompadour synonymous with disobedience. These days many ex-bōsōzoku parade around on their bikes in non-disruptive groups and enjoy dancing, performing music and socializing in groups in Harajuku, an area well known for its outrageous fashion.
 
Harajuku Black Shadow dancers (ex-bosozuku), 2008
Harajuku Black Shadow dancers (ex-bōsōzoku), hanging out in Harajuku, 2008
 
Ex-Bosozuku hanging out in Harajuku, 2008
 
Many factors are to blame for the demise of the traditional bosozuku. A former leader of from the Narushino Specter gang in the 90s (and one time Yakuza loan shark), Kazuhiro Hazuki recalls that the police were once content to allow the bōsōzoku to run riot and no matter how many times they were arrested, a gang member never had their license revoked. Over the years, revised traffic laws have led to a rise in the arrest and prosecution of the bōsōzoku. Some also point to the inclusion of women as bōsōzoku riders, now a common sight in Japan, and a less than robust economy (many bōsōzoku bikes can cost as much as ten grand) for the drastic reduction in the gang’s numbers.
 
Modern day Bosozuku
Modern-day bōsōzoku
 
Bosozuku biker girl
 
Modern Kyushakai bikers
Modern Kyushakai bikers
 
If this post has piqued your interest of vintage Japanese biker culture, there are several documentaries and films based on the bōsōzoku and other speed tribes in Japan, such as 1976’s God Speed You! Black Emperor, 2012’s Sayonara Speed Tribes, a short documentary that features historical perspective from the aforementioned Kazuhiro Hazuki, or the series of films from director Teruo Ishii based on the bōsōzoku that began in 1975 with, Detonation! Violent Riders. If you are a fan of Japanese anime, the story told in the cult film Akira deeply parallels the real world of the bōsōzoku in their heyday. Many images of the bōsōzoku of the past and their mind-boggling motorcycles follow.
 
Bosozuku biker, early 1970's
Bōsōzoku biker, early 1970’s
 
More after the jump…

Posted by Cherrybomb | Leave a comment
Vintage photos of ‘drag queens’ before it was safe to be out and proud
05.22.2015
11:20 am

Topics:
Fashion
History
Queer

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Brigham Morris Young
 
Here’s a collection of historical “drag queens” dating back to the 1800s and then onwards. The reason I’m using “drag queen” in double quotes is because I’m not entirely sure if these people were transgender, cross-dressers, dressing up as women for theatrical purposes or just for the of fun it. The information is very limited for each image. Either way, they’re all gorgeous and seem quite comfortable with themselves in front of a lens during a time when society looked down on such self-expression.


 

 

 

Frederick Park and Ernest Boulton AKA “Fanny and Stella.”
 
More after the jump…
 

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Unsettling t-shirts and skateboard decks celebrating 20th anniversary of ‘Kids’
05.20.2015
12:30 pm

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Fashion
Movies
Sex

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That startling movie by Larry Clark and Harmony Korine, Kids, turns 20 years old this year, indeed older than all of its characters. It’s rare to see a movie with a worldview this bleak enter the popular discourse so brazenly, and that the movie is just as bracing now as it was then would tend to indicate that the conscious act of infecting someone with a fatal disease is never going to be anything less than a massive attention-getter.

Among its other virtues, Kids introduced the world to such talents as Chloë Sevigny and Rosario Dawson.

Supreme is offering a special suite of skateboard decks and shirts to celebrate the movie. The tees feature the movie’s closing summary statement—“Jesus Christ. What happened?”—on the back. The items are already available in L.A., London, and NYC, and online consumers get their first chance to buy them tomorrow (May 21).

Here’s Supreme’s somewhat literate press announcement:
 

This year marks the 20th anniversary of Larry Clark’s debut film, KIDS, the portrayal of NYC youth’s escapades in the early 90’s. Some were offended by the raw and anarchic world Larry Clark documented, for those that weren’t, the film became an important document of the time, place and culture.

Through photographing skaters in NYC, Larry Clark came to meet the film’s writer, Harmony Korine and star, Leo Fitzpatrick. The rest of the cast was pieced together with a variety of downtown New York characters including original Supreme team riders Justin Pierce and Harold Hunter. It is a testament to KIDS cultural impact that it resonates today just as much as it did in 1995.

To commemorate the 20th anniversary, Supreme is proud to release a collection of items featuring stills from the iconic film KIDS. The Collection will consist of a Hooded Sweatshirt, Long Sleeved T-Shirt, two graphic T-Shirts, and three Skateboards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
via The World’s Best Ever

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
Awesome, totally awesome: They put Jeff Spicoli’s shoes on Jeff Spicoli’s shoes
05.20.2015
05:47 am

Topics:
Fashion
Movies

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Man, when I was a kid EVERYONE wanted a pair of checkerboard Vans just like Jeff Spicoli wore in Fast Times at Ridgemont High. At that moment in time, that was the epitome of cool.

But you know what’s a million times cooler than Jeff Spicoli’s pair of checkerboard Vans?

Jeff Spicoli’s checkerboard Vans on a pair of Vans!
 

“People on ‘ludes should not design shoes.”
 
The super-talented Alexis Winslow designed this pair for a charity art show. Her piece, “The Creation of Spicoli,” is a not-so-subtle homage to Michelangelo’s “The Creation of Adam,”  featuring Spicoli as Adam and, of course, Mr. Hand as God.
 

 
This pair is hand-painted and hand-embroidered.
 

 
The backs of the shoes feature the infamous Fast Times at Ridgemont High quotes, “No Shirt, No Shoes, No Dice,” and “Learn it, Know it, Live it.”
 

“What are you people? On DOPE?”

The artist’s website is here.

Posted by Christopher Bickel | Leave a comment
Poppies, pot and flying saucers: A short intro to the fashion of Nudie Cohn, country music clothier
05.13.2015
08:31 am

Topics:
Fashion

Tags:


 
There is an impression of country music as wholesome, simple, and rooted in the conservative values of middle America and the South. One of the many counters to that argument is Nudie Cohn and his Hollywood-sewn “Nudie suits.” These fashion masterpieces are all excess, sometimes with sexy images of naked ladies, pot leaves, pills and poppies, worn by everyone from Hank Williams to Keith Richards to Ronald Reagan. On top of all of that seedy flash, the sequence and flourish is downright camp—he designed for Liberace, and check out the Nudie suit that Elton John wore in this ad for “Rocket Man.”
 

 
Nudie’s beginnings were far humbler than the “country luxury” aesthetic he came to create. Born in 1902 in Ukraine, Nuta Kotlyarenko was so poor that he often had mismatched shoes collected from cast-offs (an indignity he later paid homage to by intentionally wearing mismatched boots—though generally of his own high-end custom design). After immigrating to America and changing his name at age 11, Cohn followed in his boot-maker father’s footsteps and apprenticed as a tailor. In 1940, he and his wife moved to LA and started Nudie’s Rodeo Tailors in their garage, quickly becoming the preferred couturier of the country music scene.
 

Hank Williams
 
Nudie Cohn’s influence went way beyond country though. As he adapted with the 1960s counterculture, his work became even more subversive—the “pot, pills and poppies suit” he made for Gram Parsons (see below) is one example, but was not the only time Cohn used druggy imagery. What made his work impressive though—be it the (supposedly $10,000 suit that cost $50 to make) gold lamé suit he made for Elvis or his own insane custom 1964 Pontiac Bonneville—was not only the over-the-top styling, but the sheer attention to detail and quality craftsmanship of a custom Nudie suit festooned with rhinestones or embroidery. His work has been so influential, obvious imitations rarely measure up, and the glitz and eccentricity of the Nudie Suit was essentially retired after his death in 1984. Nudie suits are highly collectible. Notable collections of Nudie suits have been amassed by actor Vincent Gallo and the late Dennis Hopper.
 

 

Helen “Bobbie Nudie” Cohn in custom gown
 

Roswell-themed suit with UFOs made for Keith Richards
 
More Nudie after the jump…

Posted by Amber Frost | Leave a comment
See Frida Kahlo’s wardrobe, locked away for 50 years
05.06.2015
11:43 am

Topics:
Art
Fashion

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Traditional Tehuana dress
 
Anyone with the remotest familiarity with the paintings of Frida Kahlo will have noticed that one of her primary subjects is her own physical pain and the fragility of her own body, especially after a life-altering accident with a bus that occurred in 1925. In that accident, the bus she was riding on collided with a trolley car, and the list of the ailments that resulted would give even the staunchest stoic pause: a broken spinal column, a broken collarbone, several broken ribs, a broken pelvis, eleven fractures in her right leg, a crushed and dislocated right foot, a dislocated shoulder; an iron handrail pierced her abdomen and her uterus as well.

It wasn’t just her paintings that referenced her broken body (Tree of Hope, 1946, is a good example); her wardrobe inevitably did as well. Her clothes were an expression of her indomitable will as much as anything else—she was determined to live a fulfilled, independent, and creative life, and thus created for herself ad hoc clothes that fused skirts and corset or prosthetic leg and boot, and accommodated her misshapen, asymmetrical legs (as a result of which, she wore long, traditional Tehuana dresses to conceal her lower body). She painted on her body casts (one of them has the Communist hammer and sickle on it).

After Kahlo’s death in 1954, her husband Diego Rivera shut her belongings in a bathroom at their Mexico City home, the Blue House, the marvelous house they shared—and then insisted that it be locked up until 15 years after his death (which, in the event, happened in 1957). In fact, the room wasn’t opened until 2004, when Ishiuchi Miyako was given permission to photograph its intimate contents. The photographs will be on display at the Michael Hoppen Gallery in London from May 14 through July 12.

The best thing that could happen to the Internet right now would be for Etsy to become infected with Kahlo’s distinctive clothing aesthetic. This is a style icon!
 

Cats-eye glasses
 

Full body cast/skirt
 
More of Frida’s fashion, after the jump…

Posted by Martin Schneider | Leave a comment
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