follow us in feedly
The 1970s, when we all expressed our individuality via mass-produced t-shirts and novelty patches

010tshirtsamz.jpg
American Motorcyclist Association.
 
I’ll ‘fess up to owning a Laurel and Hardy t-shirt when I was a child. I also had one with Humphrey Bogart saying something memorable from Casablanca. Damned if I can remember what it was now. This was as far as I would go with my counter-culture wardrobe. Most of my school friends were of similar mind. They opted for plus fours, smoking jackets and a fine selection of Arran-knit cardigans. Life was so different in Scotland then.

Of course, there were some who sported denim jackets decked out in assorted patches imported from America. These mass-produced novelties of old men saying things like “Keep on truckin’” or cartoon dogs offering advice about not eating yellow snow always struck me as frightfully quaint yet rather dumb. I suppose I was just confused as to what these badges were supposed to mean. But what did I know? I was merely an innocent child out of step with the current fashion trends.

Soon nearly every youngster across our fabled tartan nation was dressed-up like Joseph in his amazing Technicolored Dreamcoat or at least a brazen tatterdemalion. These patches all signified the same thing. I am unique. I am an individual. These are my likes and dislikes. And look, haven’t I got a wacky sense of humor?

Sad to say, all of this fun passed me by far too quickly and I missed out in the pleasures of actually becoming an individual. My taste in t-shirts was understandably laughed at by those far more in tune with the heady zeitgeist of the day. Laurel and Hardy could never compete with some twee tee saying Pepsi was the “real thing.”

Most of the fashionable peeps wore the American patches and t-shirts. Soon, these were rivaled by our very own homegrown patches declaring a love for the Bay City Rollers or tops saying “My girlfriend went to Arbroath and all she got me was this lousy t-shirt.” That kind of thing.

Those crazy delights of that faraway decade can be enjoyed with this fine selection of adverts selling counter-culture t-shirts and some ads and fine examples of the quirkier patches which were then available. If this whets the appetite then I suggest a visit to Mitch O’Connell’s blog which will leave you positively sated.
 
05tshirtshistler75.jpg
Hustler 1975.
 
01tshirtscreem.jpg
Gilda Radner in CREEM magazine t-shirt ad.
 
02tshirtscreem.jpg
CREEM.
 
03tshirtsmsmag76.jpg
Ms. 1976.
 
06tshirtssupercy.jpg
Supercycle.
 
07tshirtsvamp.jpg
Vampirella.
 
08tshirtseasyr.jpg
Easy Rider.
 
09tshirtsscrew.jpg
Screw.
 
01patchesad.jpg
How many of these did you have?
 
02patchesad.jpg
Or maybe these?
 
04patchesad.jpg
 
03patchesusa.jpg
 
07patchesplayb.jpg
 
05patchesrent.JPG
 
06patchesdirtyold.JPG
 
09patchespublic1.jpg
 
010patchessuperf.jpg
 
011patchesfinal.JPG
 
013patchescoled.JPG
 
014patcheswild.JPG
 
015patchesdown.JPG
 
016patchesfinger.JPG
 
017patchesweedies.JPG
 
018patchespussy.JPG
 
019patchesdamn.JPG
 
020patchesdontswim.JPG
 
020patchessheet.JPG
 
021patchessex.JPG
 
022patchesdevil.JPG
 
030patchessmiley.jpg
 
024patcheshorny.jpg
 
023patchesprotect.JPG
 
026woody.jpg
 
029patcheszigzag.jpg
 
025patcheswhatuc.jpg
 
028patchesstar.JPG
 
Via Mitch O’Connell, Flashbak, Mid-Life Crisis Hawaii, and Etsy.
 

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
The DEA has trippy looking patches that make you kinda WANT to do drugs
Douchebag denim company sells $298 jacket and $348 jeans with fake heavy metal patches on them

Posted by Paul Gallagher
From our partners at Vice

 

 

comments powered by Disqus