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Awesome Alfred Hitchcock action figure unveiled at Comic-Con
07.24.2014
12:30 pm

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Movies
Pop Culture

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Alfred Hitchcock


Photo via Ain’t It Cool
 
I was a little apprehensive when I heard there was going to be an Alfred Hitchcock action figure. Would Austin’s Mondo—known for their gorgeous posters—be able to do the great director justice in three dimensions? Well, I think they certainly have if this photo of the toy figure that’s starting to make the rounds on the Internet is anything to go by. Mondo did an excellent job with “The Master of Suspense,” IMO.

Sporting a fine-tailored suit, this replica of the legendary horror director comes with his directors chair, clapboard, cigars, and props from his most famous films—including a butcher knife, a raven and a seagull. The figure also comes with interchangeable hands and a stand.

I wish there were better images, but these will have to do for now. More to follow.


 
Via Superpunch

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Alfred Hitchcock’s unseen Holocaust documentary to be restored

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It is claimed Alfred Hitchcock was so traumatized after viewing footage of the liberation of the Belsen-Bergen concentration camp that the legendary film director stayed away from Pinewood Film Studios for a week.

Hitchcock had been enlisted by friend and patron, Sidney Bernstein to make a documentary on German atrocities carried out during the Second World War. The director was to use footage shot by British and Soviet film units during the liberation of the Nazi concentration camps. The material was so disturbing that Hitchcock’s complete film has rarely been seen. Speaking to the Independent newspaper, Dr Toby Haggith, Senior Curator at the Department of Research, Imperial War Museum, said:

“It was suppressed because of the changing political situation, particularly for the British. Once they discovered the camps, the Americans and British were keen to release a film very quickly that would show the camps and get the German people to accept their responsibility for the atrocities that were there.”

According to Patrick McGilligan in his biography Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light:

[Hitchcock met] with two writers who had witnessed the atrocities of Bergen-Belsen first-hand. Richard Crossman contributed a treatment, while Colin Wills, an Australian correspondent, wrote a script that relied heavily on narration.

The director had committed himself to the project early enough to give Hitchcockian instructions to some of the first cameramen entering the concentration camps. Hitchcock made a point of requesting “long tracking shots, which cannot be tampered with,” in the words of the film’s editor, Peter Tanner, so that nobody could claim the footage had been manipulated to falsify the reality. The footage was in a newsreel style, but generally of high quality, and some of it in color.

....

The footage spanned eleven concentration camps, including Bergen-Belsen, Dachau, Buchenwald, Ebensee, and Mathausen. The filmmakers ended up with eight thousand feet of film and newsreel, some of it shot by allied photographers, the rest of it impounded. It was to be cut and assembled into roughly seven reels.

Hitchcock watched “all the film as it came in,” recalled Tanner, although the director “didn’t like to look at it.” The footage depressed both of them: the piles of corpses, the staring faces of dead children, the walking skeletons. The days of looking at the footage were long and unrelievedly grim.

In the end, the planned film took Hitchcock and his team much longer than anticipated, and when it was delivered, the perceived opinion was the documentary would not help with Germany’s postwar reconstruction. Despite protests from Bernstein and Hitchcock, the documentary was dumped and five of the film’s six reels were deposited at the Imperial War Museum, where they were quietly forgotten.

Some later thought Hitchcock’s claims of making a Holocaust documentary were mere flights of fancy, that was until 1980, when an American researcher discovered the forgotten five reels listed as “F3080” in the Museum’s archives. These were screened at the Berlin Film Festival in 1985, and this incomplete and poor quality version was then shown on PBS under the title Memory of the Camps, with its original commentary by Crossman and Wills, narrated by Trevor Howard.

Now, the Imperial War Museum has painstakingly restored all six reels according to Hitchcock’s original intentions. This has led to some “wariness” over seeing the documentary as a “Hitchcock film” rather than as an important and horrific record of Nazi atrocities.

Haggith, who worked as an advisor on the project, has said the film is “much more candid” than any previous Holocaust documentary, and has described it as “brilliant” and “sophisticated.”

“It’s both an alienating film in terms of its subject matter but also one that has a deep humanity and empathy about it. Rather than coming away feeling totally depressed and beaten, there are elements of hope.

“We can’t stop the film being incredibly upsetting and disturbing but we can help people understand why it is being presented in that way.

“Judging by the two test screenings we have had for colleagues, experts and film historians, what struck me was that they found it extremely disturbing.

“When you’re sitting in a darkened cinema and you’re focusing on a screen, your attention is very focused, unlike watching it on television… the digital restoration has made this material seem very fresh. One of the common remarks was that it [the film] was both terrible and brilliant at the same time.”

Work on Hitchcock’s documentary is almost complete, and the film (with as yet to be announced new title) will be shown on British TV in early 2015 to mark the 70th anniversary of the “liberation” of Europe. The film will also be screened at film festivals and in the cinema.

The following is the 5-reel version of Hitchcock’s documentary. Warning: the film contains horrific and disturbing images, which may not be suitable viewing for all.
 

 
Via the ‘Independent’ with thanks to Tara!

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
A helpful crow lights Tippi Hedren’s cigarette, 1963
05.13.2013
10:23 am

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Amusing
Animals
Movies

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Alfred Hitchcock
The Birds


 
A gentlemanly crow lights Tippi Hedren’s cigarette.

I think we can safely assume that this was a promotional shot for Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds.

Via Retronaut

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Alfred Hitchcock vinyl toy
08.07.2012
09:55 am

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Art
Movies
Pop Culture

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Alfred Hitchcock


 
Nice Hitchcock vinyl toy by Atomic Blythe.

More photos on Flickr.

Via Super Punch

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Steve McQueen visits Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh on the set of ‘Psycho’

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A moment of Hollywood cool. Steve McQueen had already made 2 episodes of Alfred Hitccock Presents, and was about to start filming The Magnificent Seven, when he visited Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh on the set of Hitchcock’s Psycho. I wonder what they were talking about?
 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Alfred Hitchcock: Rules for watching ‘Psycho’


Via Decaying Hollywood Mansions
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Alfred Hitchcock: Rules for watching ‘Psycho’

alfred_hitchcock_psycho_poster_1960
 
To ensure he made a return on his investment, Alfred Hitchcock created a set of rules for watching his 1960 classic horror film Psycho.

We won’t allow you to cheat yourself. You must see PSYCHO from the very beginning. Therefore, do not expect to be admitted into the theatre after the start of each performance of the picture. We say no one — and we mean no one — not even the manager’s brother, the President of the United States, or the Queen of England (God bless her)!

In foyer’s across the States, a Pinkerton guard was hired to bar any late comers.

Hitchcock had invested $806,947.55 of his own money, via his company Shamley Productions, into Psycho, after the Hollywood studios denounced it a sick film which would most likely destroy the great director’‘s reputation. It didn’t. Instead it made Hitchcock a lot of money, a generation of younger fans, and inspired a whole range of psychotic slasher movies.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Happy Birthday Norman Bates: ‘Psycho’ turns 50 today

    

Behind the Scenes: Alfred Hitchcock directs ‘Frenzy’ in 1972


 
Via Open Culture
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Behind-the-Scenes: Alfred Hitchcock Directs ‘Frenzy’ in 1972

Alfred_Hitchcock_directs_Frenzy
 
Incredible behind-the-scenes footage of Alfred Hitchcock directing Frenzy from 1972.

Frenzy was greatly undervalued on its initial cinematic release - considered by many as too dark, unnecessarily seedy, and not worthy of Hitchcock’s talents, but I always thought it a superbly suspenseful and complex film that captured the lonely heart at the center of our everyday world. Taken form the novel by Arthur La Bern, Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square (which is worth reading), it was Hitchcock’s last great film, and contained some exceptionally fine characterizations by Jon Finch, Barry Foster, Anna Massey, Billie Whitelaw and in particular Alec McCowen as Chief Inspector Oxford.

The sound quality is non-existent, but just enjoy the pictures.
 

 
With thanks to Nellym
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Alfred Hitchcock on ‘Happiness’
04.09.2012
10:08 am

Topics:
Belief

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Alfred Hitchcock
Hapiness


 
Cinema’s master of the macabre defines “happiness.”
 

 
Via Dude Craft

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Original footage from Hitchcock’s ‘Rear Window’ used to make panoramic timelapse
04.03.2012
10:04 am

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Art
Movies

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Alfred Hitchcock
Timelapse
Rear Window


 
Nice panoramic timelapse of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window by Jeff Desom. According to the information on Vimeo, “The order of events is pretty much as seen in the movie.”
 

 
Via Nerdcore

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
Alfred Hitchcock Presents: ‘Back for Christmas’

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Alfred Hitchcock Presents…Back for Christmas, based on John Collier‘s story of a man who plans to murder his wife, and bury her in the cellar. Collier’s short story was originally printed in the New Yorker magazine in 1939, this was the story’s first TV outing, there were 3 different versions made for radio, including one with Peter Lorre, and was latter remade for Roald Dahl’s series Tales of the Unexpected in the 1970s.

Collier wrote dozens of stories, many of which were successfully produced for various radio, TV and film productions - including “Green Thoughts”, the basis for Roger Corman’s Little Shop of Horrors. He also contributed to such screenplays as the Humphrey Bogart / Katharine Hepburn movie The African Queen and the play based on Christopher Isherwood’s “Berlin Stories” I Am A Camera. Towards the end of his life, Collier jokingly said of himself:

“I sometimes marvel that a third-rate writer like me has been able to palm himself off as a second-rate writer.”

Hitchock’s version of Back for Christmas stars John Williams as Herbert Carpenter and Isobel Elsom as Hermione Carpenter, and was first broadcast in March 1956.
 

 
Part 2, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Alfred Hitchcock and Angry Birds
10.17.2011
11:56 am

Topics:
Art

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Alfred Hitchcock
Angry Birds


 
I couldn’t care less about the whole Angry Birds phenomenon, but I’m digging on this design titled “Them Birds” by Dan Eijah Fajardo and Pedro Kramer. It’s a nice mash-up.

(via My Modern Met)

Posted by Tara McGinley | Leave a comment
James Brown meets Alfred Hitchcock
09.29.2011
09:22 pm

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Movies
Music
Television

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Alfred Hitchcock
James Brown


 
James Brown mistakes William Castle’s Homicidal  for an Alfred Hitchcock film in this 1969 clip from the Mike Douglas show. Rod McKuen tries to clarify things while Joan Rivers looks on.

Homicidal was a knock-off of Psycho. Hitch saves Brown some embarrassment by not correcting him. Class act.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell | Leave a comment
Three reels of early Alfred Hitchcock silent film found in NZ
08.03.2011
09:42 am

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History
Movies

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Alfred Hitchcock


 
Three reels of Alfred Hitchcock’s earliest surviving feature film, 1924’s The White Shadow have been found by archivists working in New Zealand. Hitchcock, then just 24-years-old was the assistant director, art director, editor, and wrote the film, which which starred actress Betty Compton as twins, one good and, you guessed it, one who is evil. Although incomplete, the film offers a glimpse at the great director’s budding vision.

From the Hollywood Reporter:

For The White Shadow, an atmospheric British melodrama picked up for international distribution by Hollywood’s Lewis J. Selznick Enterprises, Hitchcock is credited as assistant director, art director, editor and writer. He was 24 when he worked on the film; his feature directorial debut would come soon afterward on The Pleasure Garden (1925).

The film, which stars Betty Compson in a dual role as twin sisters — one angelic and the other “without a soul” — turned up among the cache of unidentified American nitrate prints safeguarded at the New Zealand Film Archive in Wellington. The first three reels of the six-reel feature were found; no other copy is known to exist.

“These first three reels of The White Shadow — more than half the film — offer a priceless opportunity to study [Hitchcock’s] visual and narrative ideas when they were first taking shape,” said David Sterritt, chairman of the National Society of Film Critics and author of The Films of Alfred Hitchcock.

The White Shadow was one of several silent films saved by New Zealand film collector Jack Murtagh, who died in 1989. There will be an announcement this week about a U.S. screening. Some of Hitchock’s silent films (The Lodger, The Ring, Blackmail and The Pleasure Garden) are getting new scores in preparation for a BFI retrospective in London that will a part of the Cultural Olympiad festival next summer.


 
More stills after the jump…

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
‘Hitch’ - the ultimate Alfred Hitchcock cook book
07.09.2011
03:57 pm

Topics:
Animation

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Amusing
Alfred Hitchcock
Food
Cookery

image
 
Hitch is a graduation project made by Felix Meyer, Pascal Monaco, Torsten Strer, at the University of Applied Sciences and Arts in Hannover. Hitch is:

The Ultimate Hitch Cookbook, an animated book containing the recipes for Alfred Hitchcock’s classics. It’s made for Hitchcock enthusiasts and every other couch potato out there.

 

 
With thanks to Maria Guimil
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Happy Birthday Norman Bates: Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Psycho’ turns 51 today
06.16.2011
01:43 pm

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History
Movies

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Alfred Hitchcock
Psycho


 
Today in 1960, Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho was released, ushering in the age of ultra-violence in American cinema and to some extent the independent movie (Paramount were aghast at Psycho‘s script, so Hitchcock financed the film via his own Shamley Productions for $806,947.55)

Based on the novel of the same name by famed author Robert Bloch, Psycho was inspired by real-life murderer Ed Gein. It was filmed in black and white, not just to save money, but because Hitchcock knew that the shower scene would have just been too much in color. Principle filming took place on the set of Revue Studios, the same location where Hitchcock shot his television show. The Bates Motel set is still standing at the Universal Lot (see above).

Janet Leigh was apparently so upset after she saw the infamous shower scene (which had over 50 edits and used chocolate sauce for as the blood stand-in) that she tried to avoid them for the rest of her life. Leigh told documentary producers in 1997 that she would only shower if everything in the house was locked down first and she felt safe. She also always left the bathroom door open.

As, well, psychotic as Psycho is, it would take another twelve years before Hitchcock would film his sickest film of all, Frenzy. You wanna talk about a sick film? Frenzy makes Psycho seem tame by comparison. Today’s “torture porn” ain’t got nuthin’ on Hitch, baby!
 

 

Posted by Richard Metzger | Leave a comment
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