Andy Warhol paints Debbie Harry on an Amiga computer, 1985
10.22.2013
06:10 am

Topics:
Art
Science/Tech

Tags:
Andy Warhol
Debbie Harry
Amiga


 
When Commodore released the Amiga (which was the highest-quality desktop computer out there for a little while), they got a really good get for the product launch press conference in late July of 1985: none other than Andy Warhol. Rather remarkably, according to Technologizer, the launch event was “a black-tie, celebrity-studded gala at the Vivian Beaumont Theater in New York’s Lincoln Center.”

The Amiga always was a funny duck, but at the time, it offered better graphics than Apple or PCs, and it also offered a fantastic thing called multitasking. People who owned Amigas were known to be evangelical about the subject. As New York Magazine told it, Warhol murmured into a microphone, “It’s such a great thing. I’ve always wanted to be Walt Disney. I’m gonna tell everyone to get one.” (The bulk of that article is a rave review of the newly unveiled Amiga.) It’s apparent that the pixelated version of the Blondie lead singer qualifies as a “Warhol” “original” on the strength of Warhol executing the fill function a couple of times, but still.
 
Andy Warhol and Debbie Harry
 
Warhol isn’t exactly synonymous with forward-thinking technophilia, but in a lot of ways, computer-generated art fits in perfectly well with his sunny, democratic, and somewhat automated take on the world. After all, this is the guy who in The Philosophy of Andy Warhol, penned, in what is one of my absolute favorite quotations of the twentieth century, “What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coke, Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it.”
 
Amiga World
 
Warhol also made the cover of the third-ever issue of Amiga World (blurry PDF), which also scored an interview with the pop art master. In the introduction to the interview, it is made painfully clear how entirely crazy it was that the magazine got Warhol to agree to it. The interview is predictably amusing, and Warhol is epigrammatic and opaque and inscrutable in his oddly accessible way, but what does shine through is his genuine enthusiasm for the Amiga and computers in general. Also, out of nowhere Warhol uncorks this pithy gem: “Mass art is high art.”  It’s definitely worth a read.
 

Written by Martin Schneider | Discussion
Happy Birthday Debbie Harry!
07.01.2013
12:41 pm

Topics:
Music

Tags:
Blondie
Debbie Harry


 
Blondie’s Debbie Harry, as unbelievable as it sounds, turns 68 today.

We here at Dangerous Minds wish the eternal style icon and punk rock goddess a truly great day and hope that she’s somewhere with air conditioning!

Previously on Dangerous Minds:
KooKoo: H.R. Giger directs Debbie Harry music video, 1981

Death is like a box of chocolates: Debbie Harry on lurid 1971 book cover

When Debbie Harry wrestled Andy Kaufman, 1983

Debbie Harry claims she was almost murdered by Ted Bundy

Below, Debbie Harry explains ‘How To Pogo’ for Americans on Glenn O’ Brien’s TV Party:
 

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Blondie: Live in New York 1999
06.08.2013
05:55 pm

Topics:
Music
Television

Tags:
Blondie
Debbie Harry
Chris Stein
No Exit

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One to get your Saturday night swinging…

New York, 1999: Blondie’s first show in their home city for 17-years.

Having split-up in November 1982, Blondie’s started reform as a band in 1996, when Debbie Harry and Chris Stein contacted original members Clem Burke, Jimmy Destri, and Gary Valentine. This tentative re-grouping led to a tour and eventually a mixed-bag of an album No Exit, which was recorded without Valentine, who was once again out of the band by 1997.  No Exit gave Blondie, their first UK number single, “Maria,” in 20-years.

Blondie: Live in New York 1999 mixes old favorites, with new songs from No Exit. The show was originally recorded for VH1, and a longer version was later released on DVD.

Track Listing

01. “Dreaming”
02. “Hanging On The Telephone”
03. “Screaming Skin”
04. “Forgive And Forget”
05. “Shayla”
06. “Union City Blue”
07. “Sunday Girl”
08. “Maria”
09. “Call Me”
10. “Boom Boom In The Zoom Zoom Room”

Blondie are currently on tour, playing the Isle of Wight Festival next weekend, details here.
 

 
Via New York Dolls
 

Written by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
I Dream of Blondie: Debbie Harry interviewed by Annie Nightingale, 1990

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In my book, Debbie Harry can do no wrong. Whether with Blondie or as a solo artiste, Ms. Harry has made this little planet of ours a much better place—even if it is for just for 3 minutes of pop heaven at a time. Here the talented and iconic singer gives an excellent interview to Annie Nightingale—who is no slouch herself, and was the British first female DJ on BBC radio 1. Interviewed for the series One to One while promoting her album Def, Dumb & Blonde, Ms. Harry allows access to all areas of her career, and gives Nightingale some very honest and revealing answers.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Blondie’s Autoamerican: A lost classic


 

Written by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
When Debbie Harry wrestled Andy Kaufman, 1983


Caitlan Clarke, Andy Kaufman and Debbie Harry,1983

Teaneck Tanzi: The Venus Flytrap was a 1983 Broadway play that starred Debbie Harry as “Tanzi,” Caitlan Clarke as “Tanzi” and Andy Kaufman as the “referee.” Debbie Harry and Caitlin Clarke had to alternate in the lead role of “Tanzi” because of the strenuous nature of the wrestling.

Apparently the play didn’t do too well, though. Despite its success in London, Teaneck Tanzi closed on Broadway after just a single performance.

From a 2007 Gothamist interview with Debbie Harry:

What can you tell us about your Broadway debut alongside Andy Kaufman in Teaneck Tanzi?

The Venus Flytrap? [Laughs.] Well, it was a very interesting little musical play. At the time, way back in the beginning of the ‘80s, Chris [Stein, co-founder of Blondie] and I were very big wrestling fans and we used to go to the Garden all the time because we had a friend who did all the promotion there and she would get us ringside seats. We had a great time and started going to wrestling many, many years before Cindi [Lauper] starting hanging out with Lou Albano. So then all of a sudden I got this script and I thought it could be really fun. So we did the show for about three weeks in previews, downtown in a nice sort of loft space Off Off-Broadway. And it was great; the audiences were loud and everybody was shouting at the wrestlers just like a real wrestling match. And then they decided they were going to open it on Broadway and it opened and closed almost instantly! So I guess it was a little bit premature for Broadway.

 

 

 
More photos after the jump…
 

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Punk Magazine’s ‘The Legend of Nick Detroit’: With Richard Hell, David Johansen & Debbie Harry

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This is rather special - pages from John Holmstrom and Legs McNeil’s revolutionary Punk magazine, as held by The San Francisco Academy of Comic Art Collection and the Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum.

These pages come from issue No. 6, which featured The Legend of Nick Detroit, a fumetti or photo-story written and directed by McNeil and edited by Holstrom, with Roberta Bayley as director of photography.

The fictional Nick Detroit was a “...former top international Agent and super-killer now become world-weary mercenary battling the infamous Nazi Dykes and their schemes for world domination.”  The strip starred Richard Hell as Nick Detroit, with David Johansen as Mob King Tony, and Debbie Harry as Debbie Nazi Dyke. There were also appearances by Lenny Kaye, David Byrne, and “a ton of others including Terry Ork, Anya Phillips, and Nancy Spungen (in a crowd scene).”

Check more details here and here.

Best of Punk Magazine is available here.
 
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With thanks to Wendy! Via University Libraries Blog
 
More from ‘The Legend of Nick Detroit’, after the jump….
 

Written by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
Blondie on Merv Griffin, 1980
01.10.2013
01:48 am

Topics:
Punk
Television

Tags:
Debbie Harry
Chris Stein
Merv Griffin


 
Another great piece of rock history from The Merv Griffin Show. Debbie Harry and Chris Stein adapt to the role of talk show guests with the ease of the cool New Yorkers they are. And this cements Merv’s place in the Hipster Hall Of Fame. Totally.

It’s 1980 and Blondie has gone from Bowery punks to pop stars. You can tell Harry and Stein are struggling a bit with the whole fame thing.
 

 
Thanks Jim! 

Written by Marc Campbell | Discussion
Debbie Harry explains ‘How To Pogo’ for Americans
10.16.2012
11:49 am

Topics:
Dance
Punk

Tags:
Debbie Harry
The Pogo


 
A cute lesson in “pogoing” by Debbie Harry on Glen O’Brien’s legendary underground cable access show TV Party. Blondie’s Chris Stein was the show’s co-host.
 

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Death is like a box of chocolates: Debbie Harry on lurid 1971 book cover
10.02.2012
01:02 pm

Topics:
Books

Tags:
Debbie Harry


 
Debbie Harry modeled for the paperback book cover of this 1971 reissue of Scottish author Josephine Tey’s 1949 mystery novel, The Franchise Affair.

Via Kenneth in the 212

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
KooKoo: H.R. Giger directs Debbie Harry music video, 1981
07.01.2012
09:14 am

Topics:
Art
Heroes
Music

Tags:
Blondie
Debbie Harry
H.R. Giger


 
Little-known are the two music videos directed by Oscar-winning Swiss surrealist H.R. Giger for Debbie Harry’s 1981 solo album KooKoo (for which Giger also did the now iconic cover art).

“Now I Know You Know” was written by Harry and Chris Stein and produced by Chic’s resident geniuses, Nile Rodgers and Bernard Edwards. At the time of KooKoo‘s recording, sick of being “Blondie” and taking a year off from the band, Harry had dyed her signature two-tone bleached-blonde hair brunette and was pictured on the album cover with four spikes going through her head and neck (something inspired by Giger’s visit to his acupuncturist).

The video was shot in H.R. Giger’s studio in Switzerland, in it Harry cavorts around in a sexy black wig, with make-up and a body-hugging catsuit painted by Giger.

Another video was shot by Giger—and he’s in it, too, judging from the hairstyle of the masked male “magician” character—for KooKoo‘s first single, “Backfired,” but it’s pretty weak, actually.
 

 

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
The Breaking Hands: Nick Cave & Debbie Harry cover The Gun Club


 
A new Jeffrey Lee Pierce/Gun Club tribute album, The Journey Is Long features a collaboration between Nick Cave and Debbie Harry on one of The Gun Club’s best loved numbers, “The Breaking Hands.” The album also features Mick Harvey, Cave, Lydia Lunch, Warren Ellis, and Isobel Campbell & Mark Lanegan performing unrecorded Pierce songs. The Journey Is Long comes out on April 9, 2012.

I interviewed The Gun Club’s Kid Congo Powers (who was also in Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, of course) at SXSW, expect that coming up in the next day or two.
 

 
Here’s the original Gun Club version from the classic Mother Juno album:
 

 
Via The Quietus

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Debbie Harry on kids’ TV show in 1980


 
Although DM featured this in the past, the video was pulled from YouTube but has now reappeared so I thought I’d share it again. It’s that good.

Kids Are People Too ran on Sunday mornings from 1978 to 1982 on ABC and featured a lot of topnotch rock and rollers including Patti Smith, Cheap Trick, Kiss, and the fabulous Debbie Harry.
 

Written by Marc Campbell | Discussion
Blondie: Live on German TV from 1977

blondie_1977
 
To get in the New Year mood, here’s Blondie performing live on groovy German pop show Musikladen from 1977.

01. “X-Offender”
02. “Detroit 422”
03. “A Shark in Jet’s Clothing”
04. “In the Sun”
06. “Fan Mail”
06. “Little Girl Lies”
07. “Rifle Range”
08. “Cautious Lip”
09. “Contact in Red Square’
10. “Kung Fu Girls”
11. “Goldfinger”
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

The Stranglers, Blondie and Sex Pistols: Awesome live footage from 1977


 
More poptastic moments with Blondie, after the jump…
 

Written by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
Debbie Harry in Gloria Vanderbilt jeans commercial, 1980
11.07.2011
09:10 am

Topics:

Tags:
Debbie Harry
John Lurie
James Chance
Gloria Vanderbilt


 
Until the mid-70s, the only kind of bluejeans anyone really wore were Levis, Lee or Wrangler. Then came designer jeans like Calvin Klein and Gloria Vanderbilt.

To take on the big three jeans companies, these upscale upstarts needed cutting-edge celebrities to flog their togs: Calvin Klein famously used Brooke Shields and Natasha Kinski in his memorable advertising campaigns. Gloria Vanderbilt’s teen line, “GV Jr.” by Murjani had style icon Debbie Harry of Blondie as the spokes-model.

In the first one, you can see Lounge Lizard John Lurie on sax. Eagle-eyed No Wave trainspotters will also notice Mudd Club co-founder Anya Phillips and James Chance if they watch this over and over again…
 

 
After the jump, another Gloria Vanderbilt jeans commercial with Debbie Harry…

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Debbie Harry: Late on a Saturday Night, 1981
08.05.2011
04:04 pm

Topics:
Music

Tags:
Pop Culture
Television
Debbie Harry
Rap

image
 
Highlights of Debbie Harry hosting a certain late Saturday night show from 1981. The clip includes what is now believed to be the first appearance of a rap act on national US TV - the Funky Four Plus One More.

The Videodrome Discothèque is pleased to present these excerpts from the rarely seen 10th episode of the ill-fated 6th season of a certain rather popular late-night weekend entertainment program.

Fronting a marvelous one-off band, Ms. Harry offers up fabulous versions of both “Love T.K.O” (made famous by Teddy Pendergrass) AND Devo’s “Come Back, Jonee”. Chris Stein plays on both, with Clem Burke joining in for “Come Back, Jonee”.

Also included: a sketch featuring Debbie & Joe Piscopo, as well as the performance of Debbie’s special guests, The Funky Four + 1 More.

 

 
Via The Videodrome Vault
 

Written by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
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