Hippie horror movie ‘Head’: The Monkees go to Hell (sort of)
12.07.2012
01:52 pm

Topics:
Movies

Tags:
Head
Alan Rudolph


 
Head is a no-budget, atmospheric, hippie horror flick directed by Robert Altman protégé  Alan Rudolph (Choose Me, Trouble In Mind). It tells the blood-curdling tale of a longhaired, dope-smoking rock band that gets involved with occult forces in the desert of Southern California. This is the dark-side of the other Head, the silly one starring The Monkees. This is what might have happened had the Monkees gone to Joshua Tree instead of a Hollywood backlot and eaten 14 pounds of peyote followed by Jimson weed smoothies.

While there’s nothing really scary in Head, it does build up an eerie sense of dread and manages to capture the vibe of the Aquarian Age in demise - when the flower children started turning to seed. While watching the movie, it’s hard not to think of Spahn Ranch and Manson’s family of hippie psychos.

It has a suitably creepy electronic score by Harold Budd who would later make a name for himself in the avant-garde music world.

Originally titled Head, the distributors changed the title to Premonition and later to Impure so as not to be confused with the Monkees’ film. I like the confusion.

Turn up the quality to 360dp and the visuals are pretty good. Audio is very good.
 

Written by Marc Campbell | Discussion
The Electric Cinema Acid Test: The trippiest movies ever made


 
Flavorwire crafted this video montage of some of the trippiest movies ever made:

Films (in order of appearance): The Trip (1967, Roger Corman), Head (1968, Bob Rafelson), Glaze of Cathexis (1990, Stan Brakhage), Allegro Non Troppo (1976, Bruno Bozzetto), Natural Born Killers (1994, Oliver Stone), Fantasia (1940, Armstrong, Algar, et. al), 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, Stanley Kubrick), Viva La Muerte (1971, Fernando Arrabal), The Holy Mountain (1973, Alejandro Jodorowsky), Performance (1970, Donald Cammell and Nicholas Roeg), Videodrome (1983, David Cronenberg), Dark City (1998, Alex Proyas), Belle De Jour (1967, Luis Buñuel), Eraserhead (1977, David Lynch), El Topo (1970, Alejandro Jodorowsky), Tetsouro, the Iron Man (1989, Shin’ya Tsukamoto), Inland Empire (2006, David Lynch), Dead Alive (1992, Peter Jackson), Waking Life (2001, Richard Linklater), Anchorman (2004, Adam McKay), Mulholland Dr. (2001, David Lynch), Un Chien Andalou (1929, Luis Buñuel), Requiem for a Dream (2000, Darren Aronofsky), Lost Highway (1997, David Lynch), Pi (1998, Darren Aronofsky), Easy Rider (1969, Dennis Hopper), The Big Lebowski (1998, Joel Coen), Naked Lunch (1991, David Cronenberg), Skidoo (1968, Otto Preminger), Being John Malkovich (1999, Spike Jonze).

What no Sweet Movie? (Runs away).
 

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
Frank Zappa & the Monkees: ‘No, YOU’RE the popular musician, I’m dirty gross and ugly’
12.28.2010
11:04 am

Topics:
Music

Tags:
Frank Zappa
The Monkees
Head
Mike Nesmith

image
 
The Monkees are often referred to as the “Pre-Fab Four” in reference to the fact that they were obviously a TV knock-off of the Beatles, recruited from a help wanted ad in Variety. Neil Young, Stephen Stills and Harry Nilsson all auditioned to become Monkees. Stills was even cast, but stepped aside over royalties issues, recommending his then-roommate Peter Tork for the role in instead.

Still, no matter how “uncool” they were supposed to be—and I think you’ll agree that the above trio were all pretty hip young guys— the Monkees casting was a rare example of stroke of genius by committee. It’s difficult to imagine anyone but the four of them having the same chemistry, both comedically and (eventually) musically. And to further refute their “uncool” rep, John Lennon called them “the Marx Brothers of Rock” and the Beatles even hosted a party for them in London when they toured England. (Furthermore, Mike Nesmith was at the Abbey Road recording sessions for “A Day in the Life” and Peter Tork played banjo on George Harrison’s Wonderwall soundtrack).

Even that most far-out of the really far-out musicians of the day, Frank Zappa himself, made not just one, but two onscreen appearances with the Monkees: First in a TV segment where Mike pretended to be Frank and vice versa (which certainly foreshadowed Ringo’s portrayal of Zappa in 200 Motels) before they destroyed a car with a sledgehammer to the tune of “Mother People,” and again in a brief cameo in Head..
 

 
Zappa’s Head cameo, offering Davey Jones some musical advice while walking a cow through the Screen Gems studio lot.
 

 

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Saturday Morning Bliss: Porpoise Song by The Monkees
04.03.2010
11:06 am

Topics:
Movies
Music

Tags:
The Monkees
Head
Porpoise Song


Sublime!

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion