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The Move: Chop up a TV and set fire to the stage, 1966

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One of my all-time favorite bands, The Move giving a truly incendiary performance of “Watch Your Step,” at a concert in Holland from 1966.

Lead singer, the late great Carl Wayne takes an ax to a TV set; while the genius composer Roy Wood keeps out of the way, playing guitar; and drummer Bev Bevan keeps beat, as Ace Kefford and Trevor Burton keep rocking. This is a great piece of theatrical anarchy—like Hendrix setting fire to his guitar, and far better than The Who smashing instruments, for there is a sense that anything could happen.

Watch out too for the fire blazing at the side of the stage—this was the kind of exuberant behavior that led to The Move being briefly banned from every venue in the UK.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

The Genius of Roy Wood: From The Move to Wizzard


 
With thanks to Cherry Blossom Clinic
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Man-eater: A cool real time game for commuters
08.24.2012
10:45 am

Topics:
Amusing
Design
Games

Tags:
Holland
Commuting
Daniel Disselkoen

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Bored on your commute to work? Then try out this rather cool game Man-eater, by Daniel Disselkoen, who explains:

For four years, each day I took the same tram to art academy. Why would you then look out the window with curiosity when there is no reason to expect anything new. I decided to change the daily journey for my fellow passengers and myself. I wouldn’t move the tramway track, but maybe I could add something. Make something so that what already exists would look very different now.

Man-eater is part of my graduation project Remake Reality for the Royal Academy of Art, The Netherlands.

Check out more of Daniel’s work here. And if you can come up with any similar game ideas, do let us know.
 


 
Via b3ta
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment
Holland’s Roadburn: a very different kind of festival


 
So Coachella is happening. Everyone with even a passing interest in live music knows this (and most likely from the holographic Tupac performance that has become quite the meme already.) And yeah, Coachella looks cool and all, but what if that’s not your kind of thing? What if you want music that’s a bit darker, a lot heavier, basically more extreme? Well, while you are definitely in the minority there, don’t worry because you are not alone.

Happening over the same weekend as the first part of Coachella, but thousands of miles away (both literally and metaphorically) Holland’s annual Roadburn Festival is a celebration of all things doom, drone, experimental, noisy and heavy. This years festival saw performances from Michael Gira, OM, Voivod, Doom, Sleep, Kong, Yob, GNOD, Bongripper, The Obsessed, Jucifer, Black Cobra, Urfaust, Electric Orange and the very fun-sounding Mount Fuji Doomjazz Corporation.

Roadburn takes place over four days in the Dutch town of Tilburg, and has been steadily attracting a growing fan base over the last few years, enough to start its own record label (affiliated with Burning World Records.) Next year’s headliners have already been confirmed, and it will be industiral legends Godflesh performing their classic album Pure in its entirety.

Here’s a statement taken from the Roadburn website (which also features details on travel and booking tickets):

Holland’s very own Roadburn Festival has become Europe’s leading underground festival for psychedelic, avant-garde, doom or any other variation of leftfield sonic pleasures that push the boundaries of music.

Originally a spin-off of the Roadburn website, the Roadburn Festival has emerged as an event in its own right. It brings together bands, fans & media from around the world. Despite it’s international acclaim, Roadburn Festival retains an underground vibe and ethics, but with seriously big-league production values.

In addition to the music, Roadburn has earned a reputation as having a unique camaraderie between the festivalgoers, bands, organizers and staff, and ranks as one of the best and most laid-back festivals to be experienced. It is one of the festival’s primary goals to make the Roadburn experience second to none, not only for the fans but for the artists as well.

Check out the Roadburn website too for video and audio streams of past performances, and details on travel and tickets.

And while, ok, an extreme music festival is definitely not going to be to everyone’s taste (I think I’d have trouble listening to non-stop doom and drone for four days solid), it warms the cockles of the heart to know that something like this exists. Or maybe chills the cockles would be a better phrase?

Super 208 Productions have uploaded a series of video reports on the festival, one for each of its four days. Here’s part one, featuring music from Aggaloch, Michael Gira, OM,  Red Fang, and Voivod:
 

 
After the jump, Roadburn video reports parts 2-4 featuring live music from Sleep, Celestial Season, Bongripper, Purson, Kong, Valiant Thorr, Barn Owl, GNOD, Wino & Conny Ochs, Nachtmystium, Urfaust, Black Cobra, more Voivod and many more…

Posted by Niall O'Conghaile | Leave a comment
Fabulous photographs of Holland’s tulip fields
04.24.2011
03:30 pm

Topics:
Environment

Tags:
Photography
Holland
Tulips
Lisse

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From the air, Holland’s tulips fields look like a fabulous work of abstract art. These beautiful photographs of tulip farms in Lisse are published in the Daily Mail, which writes:

Tens of thousands of tourists have flocked to catch a glimpse of these spectacular quilted farmlands in all their technicolour glory.

Many flower-gazers are so excited by the views that they have parked caravans along the bulbfields in a bid to soak up every last hue.

More than three billion tulips are grown each year and two-thirds of the vibrant blooms are exported, mostly to the U.S. and Germany.

The tulip season begins in March and lasts until August with several shows held across the country, but the flowers are undoubtedly at their most spectacular at this time of year.

The cultivation of flower bulbs began more than 400 years ago and today Holland produces more than nine billion bulbs every year, of which two thirds are exported overseas.

Evenly distributed, this number would allow for almost two flower bulbs for every person on the planet.

Their dazzling colours are thanks to the years in the 17th century when Tulipmania swept the globe and the most eye-catching specimens changed hands for a small fortune.

The country’s reputation for producing the colourful flower has grown so much that the area between Haarlem and Leiden is now regarded as “De bollenstreek” or the bulb district.

But like a rainbow, this colourful landscape is a short-lived phenomenon.

When the flowers are gone, the land will be cultivated for a rather more mundane crop of vegetables.

 
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More colorful pictures of Holland’s tulip farms, after the jump…
 

Posted by Paul Gallagher | Leave a comment