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Scorching live set by T. Rex from 1972: Marc Bolan, gone but not forgotten
09.16.2012
02:20 pm
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Marc Bolan died 35 years ago today. He made an indelible mark on my life by reviving my passion for pop music when rock ‘n’ roll was starting to slide into irrelevance for me. With some of my heroes out of the picture, Morrison, Hendrix, Jones and Joplin,  Bolan’s arrival on the scene, along with Roxy Music and Bob Marley, woke my ass up to the fact that rock ‘n’ roll will always evolve in ways that beguile and excite me…and it usually happens right around the time I’m about to give up on the music. Marc Bolan and the rest softened me up for knockdown punch of punk rock.

Rescued from rusting film tins found in Ringo Starr’s garage, here’s T. Rex firing on all cylinders. The concert was filmed by Ringo in March of 1972 at Empire Pool in Wembley London and released as part of the film Born To Boogie, lovingly restored for DVD in 2005 and praised by R. Metzger for its overall “Wow factor.”

Marc Bolan and his bandmates, Mickey Finn, Bill Legend and Steve Currie, played two sets on March 18. Here’s the entire second set.
 

Posted by Marc Campbell
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09.16.2012
02:20 pm
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Seldom-seen T-Rex video for ‘Light of Love,’ 1974
09.06.2012
01:51 pm
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Bang a gong, get your T-Rextasy on with this little-known promo clip for 1974’s “Light of Love” single.

Light of Love was Marc Bolan’s sole US-only album and came out on Casablanca Records. It was a flop and ended his attempts to crack the American market. It was also his first album without Tony Visconti and it shows. The soul-influenced Light of Love used to be for sale in cut-out bins across America for 50 cents back in the day and you can still find used copies sealed at flea markets. The songs from Light of Love appeared as Bolan’s Zip Gun in the UK in 1975, his least successful release there.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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09.06.2012
01:51 pm
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Marc Bolan: Early Interview from 1970
11.10.2011
06:43 pm
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How young and beautiful, Marc Bolan looks in this TV interview from 1970. Filmed during the writing of songs for the first album as the abbreviated T.Rex - after 4 as Tyrannosaurus Rex - Marc can be seen working on “Children of Rarn” and “Suneye”, as he discusses the process of writing. Like many artists (David Lynch comes to mind), Bolan claimed he just pulled the songs out, as if they were already there, fully formed. He also said he was used by “melody” as if it were a being. O, to be touched by the Muse.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Marc Bolan on Belgium TV, 1973


 

Posted by Paul Gallagher
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11.10.2011
06:43 pm
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Marc Bolan on Belgium TV 1973
09.27.2011
03:24 pm
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A short bit of documentary footage of T. Rex arriving in Brussels, some music, and a charmingly cocky Marc Bolan interviewed on Belgium’s Pop Shop TV program in 1973.

Thanks to Spike Priggen and the folks at Bedazzled.
 

 

Posted by Marc Campbell
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09.27.2011
03:24 pm
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A Brief History of Recent Pop Culture as told through Photographs of Alice Cooper and Friends
08.05.2011
11:41 am
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A brief history of recent pop culture, as told through various photographs of Alice Cooper and Friends.
 
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Marxism: Alice and Groucho.
 
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The Super Group: Alice, Keith Moon, Harry Nilsson, Marc Bolan, 1973.
 
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Surrealism: Alice and Salvador Dali.
 
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Popism: Alice, Ray Manzarek, and Iggy.
 
Previously on Dangerous Minds
When Alice Cooper met Colonel Sanders
 
Culled from various but special thanks to This Is Not Porn
 
More photo-history with Alice plus bonus clip, after the jump…
 

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
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08.05.2011
11:41 am
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‘Elemental Child’: Amazing live performance by Marc Bolan and T.Rex
07.13.2011
07:30 pm
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Just watch and listen to this: An amazing live performance of “Elemental Child” by Marc Bolan and T.Rex, from 1971.
 

 
Previously on Dangerous Minds

Born to Boogie: Marc Bolan, Elton John and Ringo Starr, what’s not to like?


Early Marc Bolan: Tyrannosaurus Rex perform ‘Seal of the Seasons’


 
With thanks to I Will Not Return Your Records
 

 

Posted by Paul Gallagher
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07.13.2011
07:30 pm
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Early Marc Bolan: Tyrannosaurus Rex perform ‘The Seal of the Seasons’
11.11.2010
05:33 pm
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Not T-Rex, but the earlier incarnation of the band, when they were still called Tyrannosaurus Rex. Marc Bolan is seen here with percussionist Steve “Peregrin” Took, performing “The Seal of the Seasons” from their 1969 Unicorn album.

After an American tour where the decidedly much more “party hardy” Took, well, partied heartily, Bolan sacked Took, replaced him with Mickey Finn and promptly became an internationally recognized superstar. Took immediately went off to work with more underground and anarchic types like Twink (from The Pretty Things) and Mick Farren (who’d been ousted from his band, The Deviants), forming a proto-version of what became The Pink Fairies.
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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11.11.2010
05:33 pm
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Tea With Duggie Fields
11.06.2010
02:48 pm
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Tea With Duggie Fields is a beautiful and fascinating short film by Federico Fianchini, in which the Genius of Earls Court talks about his life, his art and his influences.

Fields has painted from the age of 11, when his earliest work, an abstract painting, was entered into a local exhibition amid incredulity that a child could paint so brilliantly. With an interest in structure and design, Fields briefly studied architecture, before he attended the Chelsea School of Art, between 1964 and 1968.

In the late sixties, as he established himself as an artist of note, Fields shared a flat with Pink Floyd’s crazy diamond, Syd Barrett. During the 1970s, he developed his brilliant day-glo style that inspired Marc Bolan, Stanley Kubrick, Derek Jarman and David Bowie, who was snapped with William Burroughs wearing Fields’ portrait of Malcolm McDowall.

Fields’ paintings have been variously described as Pop Art, Post Modernist and Minimalist, but in essence, Fields is very much his own art movement, one he termed MAXIMALism - “Minimalism with a plus plus plus.”

Iconic, unique and startlingly original, his work ranges from portraits of Michael Jackson, The Rolling Stones, Marilyn Monroe, Zandra Rhodes, the artist Andrew Logan, Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, to potent images of sexual intercourse, landscapes and his own distinct interpretations of his favored artistic influences (Jackson Pollock, Piet Mondrian).

Today, the Genius of Earl’s Court continues with his brilliance as painter, digital artist, musician, writer and photographer.
 

 
Bonus clips including Duggie Fields on Syd Barrett plus ‘I Wonder Why’ after the jump…
 

READ ON
Posted by Paul Gallagher
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11.06.2010
02:48 pm
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Happy Birthday Marc Bolan
09.30.2010
02:28 pm
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Today is Marc Bolan’s birthday. The father of glam rock would have been 63 today if he was still among us.

Below, the complete footage of Bolan’s interview on the Russell Harty Plus television program. Might be the best interview I’ve ever seen with him. At the end he says “I don’t think I will live that long.”
 

Posted by Richard Metzger
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09.30.2010
02:28 pm
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Orgasm: The Pop Art Explosion of John’s Children (featuring a pre-T. Rex Marc Bolan!)
04.06.2010
05:09 pm
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Before Marc Bolan blew minds as T. Rex, even before he gently blew beards as Tyrannosaurus Rex, he was demolishing stages with John’s Children, a pop-art mod band hell bent on one upping The Who in the auto-destructive art department. 

Featuring Andy Ellison on vocals, Geoff McLelland on guitar, John Hewlett on bass, and wild man Chris Townson on drums, Bolan joined the band briefly in 1967 and wrote one of their most beloved songs, the very twisted and far out Desdemona, which can be heard in the above video that features photos of Bolan with the band.  Although he doesn’t sing lead, his patented guitar playing is front and center and his one of a kind vibrato voice provides backup. The suggestive lyric ‘Lift up your skirt and fly’ was enough for the BBC to ban the song, and after a brief four month stint, Bolan moved on to develop himself as a solo artist.

Sans Bolan, John’s Children would continue to plug away, wrecking stages in their midst and creating a reputation based on their antics rather than their musicianship. They even released an album that would find American distribution on White Whale Records called Orgasm, which was ruined by a record exec’s brilliant idea of inserting crowd noise between songs to make it seem “live.” 

Below is a little-known promotional video the band made for the album, which is apparently part of a film called Smashed Blocked that never saw the light of day. Band member Andy Ellison, whose Corn Flake Zoo must be heard to be believed, even commented on an older post of the video that “Smashed was a mod term for drunk, and blocked was a mod term for being pilled up (high on amphetamines).”  This newer version of the video has significantly better sound that others.  Dig it!
 

Posted by Elvin Estela
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04.06.2010
05:09 pm
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