Jack Kirby makes a fleeting cameo appearance on ‘The Incredible Hulk’ TV series, 1979
07.07.2013
01:06 pm

Topics:
Television

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Jack Kirby
The Incredible Hulk

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For fans of Jack Kirby, here’s a fleeting glimpse of the great artist in an uncredited cameo appearance as a police sketch artist in this episode of TV series The Incredible Hulk, “No Escape” from 1979.

Kirby was co-creator, with Stan Lee of The Hulk, the angry, green (though originally gray) alter-ego to mild-mannered scientist Doctor Bruce Banner. The Incredible Hulk comic book made its first appearance in May 1962, and The Hulk was as much inspired by Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde as he was by the fears of genetic mutation from radioactive fallout.
 
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Via Scheme 9

Written by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
Communism’s Mightiest Super-Heroes: What if Stan Lee and Jack Kirby had been Russian?

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The Freedom Collective is a one-shot comic that pays homage to the story-telling and artistry of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, and asks:

What if…those two giants had lived and worked in Russia and shared its hopes and fears of the time?

It’s a neat idea and shows ‘Communism’s mightiest super-heroes, striking at the heart of evil Capitalism for the workers of the world!

Can the Krimson Kommisar, MIG-4, Mastodon, Ajys and Homeland defeat the power of the evil Chief? It is a crime against the State not to buy the comic and find out. And crimes against the State are taken VERY seriously.

Written by Igor Sloano and Comrade Barr, with Art by Domski Regan and Comrade Barr, The Freedom Collective is produced by Rough Cut Comics, and has already received high praise from The Jack Kirby Collector, Grant Morrison and Alex Ross. It is a must-have for all Comrades of Great Comic Art.

Order your copy here, before its too late!
 
Bonus pictures of the Communist Super-heroes in action, after the jump…
 

Written by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
Comic book couture: Marvel Comics-inspired fashion hits the runways


 
Sydney-based fashion designers Anna Plunkett and Luke Sales—whose label is called Romance Was Born—showcased their spring / summer 2012/13 collection yesterday at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia.

There’s some debate on the Internet whether or not these designs are Jack Kirby inspired. Maybe the backdrop behind the models?
 

 

 
More after the jump…

Written by Tara McGinley | Discussion
When Paul McCartney Met Jack Kirby

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This is the moment Paul McCartney met comic book hero Jacky Kirby in 1975. It was at the Forum, Los Angeles, where McCartney and his band Wings, were booked to play three concerts. This was Macca’s first time back in LA since touring with The Beatles. Wings had just released Venus and Mars, which contained the track “Magneto and Titanium Man”, a song inspired by Marvel’s X-Men created by Kirby and Stan Lee. The pair met backstage at the Forum, where Jack presented Macca with a line drawing:

Then around the corner came Paul. “‘Ello Jack, nice to meet you.” Jack gave Paul and Linda the drawing which they thought was “smashing.” Paul thanked Jack for keeping him from going bonkers while they were recording the album in Jamaica. It seems that there was very little to do there, and they needed to keep their kids entertained. Luckily, there was a store that sold comics, so Paul would go and pick up all the latest. One night the song “Magneto and Titanium Man” popped into his head. The thing about Jack was that within a few minutes you felt as if you were best friends, so Paul too was soon laughing it up with Jack as if he had known him for years.

 
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Previously on Dangerous Minds

Hockey Puck…Jack Kirby Meets…Don Rickles

 
Via Scheme 9
 

Written by Paul Gallagher | Discussion
Ben Grimm sez “It’s Hanukkah, time!”
12.01.2010
03:16 pm

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Tags:
Jack Kirby
Hanukkah
Ben Grimm
Fantastic Four

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A festive Ben Grimm in a hand-drawn Hanukkah message from the great Jack Kirby. Grimm is, of course, a Jewish super hero. The character’s early life was modeled after Kirby’s own childhood spent in New York’s Lower East Side.

Via the Boing Boing Submitterator

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Hockey puck! Jack Kirby meets… Don Rickles?
08.13.2010
06:00 pm

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Jack Kirby
Don Rickles
Jimmy Olsen
"Goody Rickels"

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Behold what is perhaps the most perplexing comic book cover of all time. In 1971, when Jack “King” Kirby left Marvel for DC Comics, he took over the Jimmy Olsen (“Superman’s Pal”) title. It’s hard to imagine a more dull comic franchise for the co-creator of Spider-man and the Fantastic Four to be assigned, but the story was that Kirby didn’t want to take anyone’s job when he arrived at DC, so Jimmy Olsen is what he got. And then he promptly turned it inside out, as should be obvious from this preposterous cover featuring, uh… Don Rickles??? That’s right HOCKEY PUCK, Don Rickles, who in this (and one more issue) is seen fighting off his alternate world doppelganger, “Goody Rickels.”

So weird. I mean, why Don Rickles and not… like Bob Newhart or Shelly Berman???

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Fantastic Four: Introducing The Black Panther

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Dangerous Minds pal Charles Johnson has posted another tasty classic comics cover over at Little Green Footballs. Wait until Glen Beck gets ahold of this, PROOF that Marvel Comics promotes racism or reverse racism or Communism… or something:

Since the New Black Panther Party has been the race-baiting rage lately, here’s a related cover image from the Lizard Collection: issue #52 of Fantastic Four, a classic released in July 1966, an arguably more innocent and open time. This book featured the first appearance of African superhero Black Panther, who would go on to become one of the Avengers. It’s Jack Kirby and Stan Lee at the top of their talents, drawing on 60s memes and cultural icons to create a new, distinct, and very influential form of pop art.

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion
Jack Kirby: 2001
05.19.2010
09:29 pm

Topics:
Art

Tags:
Jack Kirby
2001
Oh shit I broke my brain
Written by Jason Louv | Discussion
Heirs of Jack Kirby sue Marvel/Disney
03.21.2010
06:22 pm

Topics:

Tags:
Jack Kirby
Stan Lee
Marvel Comics

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This lawsuit from the heirs of the great comic artist Jack Kirby has been a looong time coming. The legal ramifications of this case are immense, considering the billion dollar value of these corporate trademarks. Comic artists often signed away rights to their creations during the “Golden Age” of the industry, putting their signatures on contracts measurably worse than the ones signed by blues musicians.

From the New York Times:

When the Walt Disney Company agreed in August to pay $4 billion to acquire Marvel Entertainment, the comic book publisher and movie studio, it snared a company with a library that includes some of the world’s best-known superheroes, including Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Incredible Hulk and the Fantastic Four.

The heirs of Jack Kirby, the legendary artist who co-created numerous Marvel mainstays, were also intrigued by the deal. Mr. Kirby’s children had long harbored resentments about Marvel, believing they had been denied a share of the lush profits rolling out of the company’s superheroes franchises.

They spent years preparing for a lawsuit by enlisting a Los Angeles copyright lawyer, Marc Toberoff, to represent them. When the Marvel deal was struck, Mr. Toberoff — who helped win a court ruling last year returning a share of Superman profits to heirs of one of that character’s creators — sprang into action.

Pow! Wham! Another high-profile copyright fight broke out in Hollywood, and this one could be the broadest the industry has yet seen.

A Supersized Custody Battle Over Marvel Superheroes (New York Times)

Written by Richard Metzger | Discussion